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By Ellie Kahn, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
For the past few years, Lara DiPaola has come home from her job in marketing and started her second job, as an unofficial translator for her 13-year-old-daughter, Katie. Like many teens, Katie speaks in abbrevs — shortened or combined versions of words or phrases, popular in text messages and on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. It's up to DiPaola to fill in the missing letters. "I'd say to my daughter, 'Katie, where did you leave the blow-dryer?' and she'd respond, 'IDK,'" said DiPaola, who lives in Severn.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Many people find slang annoying; that's as it should be. Thieves have argot, the language in which they conduct their business privately. Professionals have jargon, by which they identify qualified colleagues. Teens and hipsters have slang to separate those who are in the group from those who are not. So if slang annoys you, it's supposed to. It makes clear that you are an outsider, that you are not with it.  But outsiders also have their weapons, and you and I, the hopelessly unhip, can wield slang itself as a counterattack.
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By Deborah Work and Deborah Work,Fort Lauderdale Sun-SentinelFort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 13, 1993
Hovering in the shadows at her teen-age son's party, Carline Moore overhears this snatch of conversation:"There it is. This jam is thick. Plenty of mad honeys, dope system.""We phat. But I gotta flex. I'll be maxin' at the crib.""I'm easin' here. Later.""Later."Come again?For the uninitiated, it's the language of the hip-hop generation, and it can be heard in malls, on the street and in classrooms -- even prep-school classrooms.Hoopty, hotty, hoochie. Slang is colorful, descriptive patter that eases communication among young folks while keeping parents and teachers at bay. If you talk to teens, you'd best be savvy because slanguage is always changing, always confounding.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Earlier today I commented on an article by Anne Curzan on people's objections to legitly , suggesting that you might want to lighten up.  But I know that slang leaves some of you tetchy, and, ever the helpful editor, I'd like to offer some relief.  Send me some of the slang words and cant phrases that go up your nose. I will use them in posts at this site. Once the Young People witness a palpable geezer adopting them, that will be the end. Think that that is just too cray-cray to work?
FEATURES
By Colleen O'Connor and Colleen O'Connor,Dallas Morning News | July 14, 1995
Like it or not, the '60s word "chick" is back on the scene. Other bits of hippie slang -- like stone fox -- may languish in the retro-chic ragbag.But chick is chic.Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders says she likes being called a chick. So do the Dixie Chicks.A baby shower invitation for Mary Matalin of CNBC's "Equal Time" said, "Chicks Only."Hillary Rodham Clinton laughed when the media called her trip to Asia a "chicks' trip."PBS ran an all-female movie-reviewer show called "Chicks on Flicks," and a new summer movie, "A Little Princess," is now being dubbed a "chick-ette movie" for young girls.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
As the scene opens, two girls are discussing their sneakers in front of lockers on the third floor at Francis M. Wood Senior High School. It seems the $95 pair owned by one girl is no longer chic."
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN AMORIM | December 1, 2005
Aaron Peckham is, by his own definition, an "enginerd." But this is one software engineer who loves earthly argot as much as cyber-coding. Peckham, 24, compiles the cultish compendium of old-school and fresh-from-the-street slang known as Urbandictionary .com. Last month, the best of the site was published in the real world - or meatspace, as the cyber-dudes call it. Although the 300,000 Web entries are pared to 2,000 for Urban Dictionary: Fularious Street Slang Defined (Andrews McMeel, $12.95)
NEWS
May 11, 2003
Generation O is slang for the current group of obese youngsters. -- Wired magazine
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Many people find slang annoying; that's as it should be. Thieves have argot, the language in which they conduct their business privately. Professionals have jargon, by which they identify qualified colleagues. Teens and hipsters have slang to separate those who are in the group from those who are not. So if slang annoys you, it's supposed to. It makes clear that you are an outsider, that you are not with it.  But outsiders also have their weapons, and you and I, the hopelessly unhip, can wield slang itself as a counterattack.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Earlier today I commented on an article by Anne Curzan on people's objections to legitly , suggesting that you might want to lighten up.  But I know that slang leaves some of you tetchy, and, ever the helpful editor, I'd like to offer some relief.  Send me some of the slang words and cant phrases that go up your nose. I will use them in posts at this site. Once the Young People witness a palpable geezer adopting them, that will be the end. Think that that is just too cray-cray to work?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
You go to work with the language you have, not the language you want.  The Fowler brothers thought that English would be tidier if we used that to introduce restrictive clauses and which  to introduce nonrestrictive clauses. Prescriptivists have seized on that suggestion and persuaded many editors and some writers that it is a Rule rather than a recommendation or pious hope.  The redoubtable Kory Stamper, in one of her excellent Merriam-Webster videos on usage , explains that merely thinking it's a rule does not make it one. Similarly, before you start to peeve about what a Wicked Thing the passive voice is, you might want to take the time to look at how frequently you use passive constructions yourself.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
I advised you recently then when you read about someone complaining about the "dumbing-down" of English , just stop reading. That was incomplete advice. The next time you see someone complaining that the Young People are destroying the language with text-speak, stop reading. Close the page. Do not read further. You would be encouraging a fool to proceed.  Fads come and go, but the language endures. The Young People embrace slang, and when older people discover it, they drop it. Why are the Young People fleeing Facebook?
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Responding to my recent post, "Steer clear of the purity people," which linked to Bronwen Clune's Guardian article "My problem with the grammar police,"  Jeremy Wheeler commented on Facebook:  I clicked through to the Guardian article and read the first page of comments - a mistake, probably. What I found depressing about most of the comments (which were the usual mixture of declarations that the language is going to the dogs, spurious rules , assertions that spelling mistakes are a sign of a decline in educational standards, and so on)
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Perhaps before we publish, or read, any more inane articles about lexicography, we might take a moment to reflect on what dictionaries are for .  One of the latest misguided (read: stupid) articles on the subject is by Michael Dirda in The Washington Post :  "Oxford Dictionaries adds' twerk,; 'FOMO,' 'selfie,' and other words that make me vom. "  As the headline indicates, Oxford University press has gathered up a number of slang terms for the quarterly update of the Oxford Dictionaries Online*, and Mr. Dirda is not pleased with them.  Before we get to the lexicography, we might ask why Mr. Dirda thought we would be interested in his personal preferences in vocabulary.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
@Mededitor tweets about "a tiresome grammar tirade (w/bonus 'entropy of our language')" at MMO Champion .  We are favored there by the observations of zeropeorth, who, thanks to his (sounds like a "he") superb command of the majestic English tongue, can instantly spot minor spelling errors: "to, two, too. " Who can suss out vogue usages online: "ermahgerd. " And who can single-handedly fuse the principles of physics, medicine, and linguistics: "As this entropy of our language has started to appear as an epidemic ... I'm fretting for our future ability to communicate.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
The ever-game Steve Kleinedler of the American Heritage Dictionary took on one of those chores that regularly fall to lexicographers: He appeared on Boston's WBUR to talk about words people want deleted from dictionaries .  Literally  and impacted  left my eyebrows level. Yeah, yeah. And some unduly excitable types, you'll see in the comments, got exercised when the executive editor of the American Heritage Dictionary , in the unbuttoned atmosphere of conversation uttered "a whole nother.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
You go to work with the language you have, not the language you want.  The Fowler brothers thought that English would be tidier if we used that to introduce restrictive clauses and which  to introduce nonrestrictive clauses. Prescriptivists have seized on that suggestion and persuaded many editors and some writers that it is a Rule rather than a recommendation or pious hope.  The redoubtable Kory Stamper, in one of her excellent Merriam-Webster videos on usage , explains that merely thinking it's a rule does not make it one. Similarly, before you start to peeve about what a Wicked Thing the passive voice is, you might want to take the time to look at how frequently you use passive constructions yourself.
NEWS
July 19, 1994
J.E. LIGHTER and his publishers at Random House have some nerve, tempting us with the first volume of the Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang, but giving us only seven letters worth of entries. Entries H - R won't be available until 1996 and it is speculated that we won't be able to put our hands on S - Z until 1997.Admittedly, the HDAS (which may become the PDR equivalent for writers, crossword puzzlers and other language lovers) is made up of 20,000-plus entries of A - G slang.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Is this Maryland's best sandwich (pictured above)? It sure looks great. Food Network Magazine has proclaimed the pit beef sandwich at Pioneer Pit Beef the single must-try sandwich in Maryland. The Pit Beef sandwich joins 49 other notables in the feature "50 Sandwiches, 50 States," available on newsstands Tuesday and online at blog.foodnetwork.com . On the Pit Beef sandwich, the editors write: “'Pit beef' is Baltimore's slang for this beloved classic: sliced slow-grilled beef piled high on a soft kaiser bun.”  The sandwich is available for $5.50 at 1600 N. Rolling Road.
FEATURES
By Ellie Kahn, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
For the past few years, Lara DiPaola has come home from her job in marketing and started her second job, as an unofficial translator for her 13-year-old-daughter, Katie. Like many teens, Katie speaks in abbrevs — shortened or combined versions of words or phrases, popular in text messages and on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. It's up to DiPaola to fill in the missing letters. "I'd say to my daughter, 'Katie, where did you leave the blow-dryer?' and she'd respond, 'IDK,'" said DiPaola, who lives in Severn.
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