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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
A water pipe blocked by tiny pieces of "slag" — likely pipe shavings or soldering residue — was to blame for the water issues that left many residents of the downtown Zenith apartments without water or air conditioning this week, according to a city public works spokesman. Going floor to floor Tuesday afternoon, crews restored services in the 21-story building, said Lauren McDonald, a spokeswoman for the company that manages the Zenith. The slag pieces, each about the size of a dime, were located by city crews Monday in the filtering screen of a 6-inch-wide "backflow preventer" in the building's internal water system, not in lines maintained by the city, said Kurt Kocher, the public works spokesman.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
A water pipe blocked by tiny pieces of "slag" — likely pipe shavings or soldering residue — was to blame for the water issues that left many residents of the downtown Zenith apartments without water or air conditioning this week, according to a city public works spokesman. Going floor to floor Tuesday afternoon, crews restored services in the 21-story building, said Lauren McDonald, a spokeswoman for the company that manages the Zenith. The slag pieces, each about the size of a dime, were located by city crews Monday in the filtering screen of a 6-inch-wide "backflow preventer" in the building's internal water system, not in lines maintained by the city, said Kurt Kocher, the public works spokesman.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Just when Baltimore County highway officials thought they were safe from the nightmare of ice, snow, freezing rain and complaints about unplowed streets, along comes the slag menace -- 40,000 tons of it.Residents have been complaining about the gritty, dusty cinders dumped on their roads to give drivers traction on ice, and officials now say highway crews will pick up the mess they left behind.The slag dust has been a nuisance for car owners who finally got a chance to wash away the winter salt, and a hazard for youngsters on in-line skates.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
For years, the wastes from burning coal and producing copper have enjoyed a second life, used in sand-blasting to remove paint, rust and grime from ship's hulls, storage tanks, bridge trusses and other surfaces. Painting contractors, shipyard workers and thousands of others in Baltimore and across the country are said to use the black, gritty material called slag. Now, though, questions have been raised about whether those who do blasting with ground-up coal or copper slag may be unwittingly exposing themselves to toxic contaminants that could damage their health.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
State safety inspectors are investigating the death of a worker at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant who officials said was killed Wednesday when a 500-pound piece of slag hit him near a blast furnace.Charles Hammond, 49, of the 5600 block of East Ave. in Overlea was killed at 2: 30 p.m. near the plant's "L" blast furnace, a spokesman for the county Fire Department said.Marco K. Merrick, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, confirmed yesterday that inspectors from the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health division visited Bethlehem Steel after the accident.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
For years, the wastes from burning coal and producing copper have enjoyed a second life, used in sand-blasting to remove paint, rust and grime from ship's hulls, storage tanks, bridge trusses and other surfaces. Painting contractors, shipyard workers and thousands of others in Baltimore and across the country are said to use the black, gritty material called slag. Now, though, questions have been raised about whether those who do blasting with ground-up coal or copper slag may be unwittingly exposing themselves to toxic contaminants that could damage their health.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
With the thermometer in the 90s and the era of ice-slicked roads, bruised tailbones, and fender benders long past, Baltimore County residents have yet to rid themselves of the last vestige of the worst winter in recent memory -- slag.Highway crews dumped 40,000 tons of the dusty, gritty cinders on county roads when they ran out of salt, and the effort to clean up the mess is still only "60 to 70 percent" complete, said Charles K. Weiss, chief of the Baltimore County Bureau of Solid Waste Management.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 23, 1991
OBERROTHENBACH, Germany -- The tiny town and the area surrounding it in the far eastern part of what used to be East Germany are home to the deadliest legacy of the Cold War.Until last month, Oberrothenbach was part of a top-secret Soviet uranium project. Now it is the center of Europe's largest environmental disaster area, and the cleanup will take 10 to 15 years and cost at least $10 billion.With at least 5,000 deaths directly attributable to the project, many experts already consider it the largest peacetime radioactive catastrophe next to the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Soviet Union in 1986.
NEWS
April 22, 2008
Dixon, Alonso host school safety session for 300 teachers About 300 Baltimore teachers attended a session on school safety yesterday that was hosted by Mayor Sheila Dixon and schools chief Andres Alonso. The forum, previously scheduled for Alonso to brief teachers on the school system budget, changed focus in response to a rash of violence in and near schools in recent weeks. The violence has included a teacher assault that was recorded on camera and highly publicized. And yesterday, the Harlem Park school complex was under lockdown after a shooting in the neighborhood.
NEWS
August 13, 1994
Dear DiaryThis is a new one. Joshua Steiner: "I lied to my diary." Wow.Charles C. GardnerBaltimoreThe ConstellationYour Aug. 7 editorial, "Don't Give Up the Ship," is precisely the kind of positive support required to save the Constellation from the burial-at-sea fate for which she was destined when saved by the Baltimore area community in the early 1950s.The Constellation arrived in the sheltered waters of the Patapsco several days before a disastrous hurricane reached the Atlantic coast.
NEWS
April 22, 2008
Dixon, Alonso host school safety session for 300 teachers About 300 Baltimore teachers attended a session on school safety yesterday that was hosted by Mayor Sheila Dixon and schools chief Andres Alonso. The forum, previously scheduled for Alonso to brief teachers on the school system budget, changed focus in response to a rash of violence in and near schools in recent weeks. The violence has included a teacher assault that was recorded on camera and highly publicized. And yesterday, the Harlem Park school complex was under lockdown after a shooting in the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
By Chriss Swaney and By Chriss Swaney,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2001
PITTSBURGH - A one-time riverside slag dump where refuse from Pittsburgh's blast furnaces formed towers as high as 20-story buildings is being turned into the city's largest residential development since World War II. Site clearance is under way for Summerset, a residential community intended to rejuvenate a former industrial dump along the Monongahela River into a community designed according to the tenets of the New Urbanism movement, with front porches,...
NEWS
By James Drake and James Drake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 1998
HORNO, Germany -- Erich Muller breaks off tilling his vegetable patch, fires up a cheap cigar and looks around at the sleepy hamlet that has been his home since childhood."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
State safety inspectors are investigating the death of a worker at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant who officials said was killed Wednesday when a 500-pound piece of slag hit him near a blast furnace.Charles Hammond, 49, of the 5600 block of East Ave. in Overlea was killed at 2: 30 p.m. near the plant's "L" blast furnace, a spokesman for the county Fire Department said.Marco K. Merrick, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, confirmed yesterday that inspectors from the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health division visited Bethlehem Steel after the accident.
NEWS
August 13, 1994
Dear DiaryThis is a new one. Joshua Steiner: "I lied to my diary." Wow.Charles C. GardnerBaltimoreThe ConstellationYour Aug. 7 editorial, "Don't Give Up the Ship," is precisely the kind of positive support required to save the Constellation from the burial-at-sea fate for which she was destined when saved by the Baltimore area community in the early 1950s.The Constellation arrived in the sheltered waters of the Patapsco several days before a disastrous hurricane reached the Atlantic coast.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
With the thermometer in the 90s and the era of ice-slicked roads, bruised tailbones, and fender benders long past, Baltimore County residents have yet to rid themselves of the last vestige of the worst winter in recent memory -- slag.Highway crews dumped 40,000 tons of the dusty, gritty cinders on county roads when they ran out of salt, and the effort to clean up the mess is still only "60 to 70 percent" complete, said Charles K. Weiss, chief of the Baltimore County Bureau of Solid Waste Management.
BUSINESS
By Chriss Swaney and By Chriss Swaney,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2001
PITTSBURGH - A one-time riverside slag dump where refuse from Pittsburgh's blast furnaces formed towers as high as 20-story buildings is being turned into the city's largest residential development since World War II. Site clearance is under way for Summerset, a residential community intended to rejuvenate a former industrial dump along the Monongahela River into a community designed according to the tenets of the New Urbanism movement, with front porches,...
NEWS
By James Drake and James Drake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 1998
HORNO, Germany -- Erich Muller breaks off tilling his vegetable patch, fires up a cheap cigar and looks around at the sleepy hamlet that has been his home since childhood."
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Just when Baltimore County highway officials thought they were safe from the nightmare of ice, snow, freezing rain and complaints about unplowed streets, along comes the slag menace -- 40,000 tons of it.Residents have been complaining about the gritty, dusty cinders dumped on their roads to give drivers traction on ice, and officials now say highway crews will pick up the mess they left behind.The slag dust has been a nuisance for car owners who finally got a chance to wash away the winter salt, and a hazard for youngsters on in-line skates.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 23, 1991
OBERROTHENBACH, Germany -- The tiny town and the area surrounding it in the far eastern part of what used to be East Germany are home to the deadliest legacy of the Cold War.Until last month, Oberrothenbach was part of a top-secret Soviet uranium project. Now it is the center of Europe's largest environmental disaster area, and the cleanup will take 10 to 15 years and cost at least $10 billion.With at least 5,000 deaths directly attributable to the project, many experts already consider it the largest peacetime radioactive catastrophe next to the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Soviet Union in 1986.
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