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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
''Slacker'' is a cult film. It was meant to play special theaters and in this instance, it is. It is showing at the Charles.The film, written, produced and directed by Richard Linklater, is a "chain" comedy in which the cameras introduce us to one character, who, in turn, meets another, who, in turn, becomes the focal character.For a time, the film just bores, then as we get used to the format, it begins to entertain. This enchantment lasts for a time, then the movie begins to bore again, primarily because the characters are boring.
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NEWS
November 9, 2013
It's election season and again candidates go after the rich to pay more and raise the minimum wage - to $16.70 over eight years in one case ( "Mizeur backs income tax cut for 90%," Nov. 7). Where this to go into effect, we seniors will be crushed by the new prices, and none shall be spared. It makes me wonder why I paid attention in school, worked at Bethlehem Steel to pay my own way to college, showed up for work even when I was sick, lame or lazy. Soon, a floor sweeper will make about $17,000 a year more then the average Social Security recipient.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 11, 1994
"Clerks" is somewhat problematical as a movie, but as a document of slacker anthropology, it is first-class. For that reason alone, I meant to give it three stars instead of 2 1/2 , but I'd already typed "2 1/2 " and it was too much trouble to go back and change it.Its very rawness gives it meaning and expresses its profound embrace of the slacker mind-set. Unlike, say, "Reality Bites," it is completely unpolished and lacks even low-end professional show-biz attributes. It just doesn't give a damn.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
In response to the detention center scandal in Baltimore, it's not hard to understand who runs the jail. It is clearly known who runs Baltimore and who runs Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown. This misleading authority of slackers who hold titles should be in jail themselves. President Barack Obama can testify to what advantages can be taken today. Slackers are voted in by their peers or hired by their family and a loss takes place that the rest of Maryland clearly sees every day. Is it a wonder any system in Baltimore will inevitably fail.
FEATURES
By N.Y.Times News Service | August 8, 1991
HOUSTON -- In 1989, with $23,000 in borrowed money, some of it from credit-card advances, Richard Linklater set out to make an affectionate pseudo-documentary about the alienated college graduates, neo-beatniks and assorted eccentrics in Austin, Texas, his hometown.The result was "Slacker," a shoestring production that is rapidly accumulating favorable notices and a cult following as it makes its way into theaters around the country."Slacker" has been playing at the Angelika Film Center in New York City since July 5 and has opened at theaters in Los Angeles, San Diego, Houston and Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | August 14, 2005
THE KING OF KINGS COUNTY By Whitney Terrell. Viking. 361 pages. Half coming-of-age tale and half tangled history of a modern American city, Terrell's second novel manages to be both intimate and epic. Narrated by a watchful 14-year-old named Jack Acheson, the book begins in the mid-1950s on the brink of a new era in Kansas City, Mo. Jack's father Alton, a schemer with big dreams but little cachet, is determined to cash in on the city's expansion when a new interstate highway transforms the outlying cornfields into suburbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alfred Lubrano and Alfred Lubrano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 12, 2005
LANCASTER, Pa. - Brad Rutter is proof that the gods keep an eye out for slackers. The 27-year-old Johns Hopkins University dropout and former record-store worker beat quiz-show legend Ken Jennings on Jeopardy! Ultimate Tournament of Champions on May 25, winning $2 million. Add that to the Jeopardy! booty he has scored since he first played the game in 2000, and his total is $3,255,102, making Rutter the biggest TV game-show winner in history, according to the show's people. Not exactly tied to the fast track - "I'm not ambitious and I don't need to work for The Man" - Rutter is an amiable guy with a "flypaper memory" that allows him to capture and keep stray facts that he then marshals for money.
TOPIC
By Martin Miller | September 19, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- It was the early 1990s, and recent college grad Stephanie Brail was doing precisely what someone of her generation was supposed to be doing. Nothing.Like many so-called Gen-Xers -- the 80 million Americans born between 1961 and 1981 -- she was rudderless. The English and music major drifted for several years, working at a nonprofit here, writing a free-lance piece there. In between, there was a lot of time in coffeehouses.Then she started to teach courses about computers, something she had used in one form or another since childhood.
NEWS
By Joe Garofoli and Joe Garofoli,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
Richard Linklater laughs at the juxtaposition. The writer/director of "Slacker," the movie that inspired the pop-culture term, is dining at San Francisco's posh Ritz-Carlton hotel. You can easily pick out the erstwhile slacker in the sea of dark suits and white hair; he's the one in the thermal pullover and jeans.This isn't a case of Slacker Goes Nob Hill. It's just Hollywood custom that Castle Rock Entertainment would house the director of its new film, "subUrbia," in swank digs. Yet six years after "Slacker" introduced Linklater to the world, the 35-year-old remains anti-Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | January 27, 1995
You never outgrow your need for Austin, Texas, not even when you're Richard Linklater and capable of defecting to Hollywood at any moment.Mr. Linklater, a film director who maintains bases of operation in both Austin and Los Angeles, is not one to turn away from his origins."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
The goofiest part about the O'Malley campaign's absurd attempt to link Bob Ehrlich , in an attack ad released last week, to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill? It's not the part about the two pro-oil votes he cast as a congressman, the ones that put him in league with such Big Oil lackeys as Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and then-Rep. Ben Cardin . Or where the ad takes a snippet of Ehrlich saying, "Drill, baby, drill," and tries to pass it off as anything other than Ehrlich parroting his former lieutenant, Michael Steele . (The ex-gov from Arbutus is about as likely to share Steele's Telly Savalas -y "baby" verbal tic as he is Steele's hip-hop tailor.
NEWS
By Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted | November 21, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Body of Lies: *** ( 3 STARS) This spy vs. spy thriller is smart, tense and rippling with topicality. Leonardo DiCaprio's deceptively rugged CIA agent masterminds the capture of a new world-class terrorist (Alon Abutbul) despite the bungling and interference of his Langley, Va.-based boss (Russell Crowe). DiCaprio creates an existential juggler throwing a fistful of knives in midair - and he doesn't drop a single blade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By staff critics' | October 23, 2008
Beverly Hills Chihuahua What it's about: A spoiled Chihuahua named Chloe (voice of Drew Barrymore) gets dognapped and taken to Mexico City, where some newfound friends (including a German shepherd named Delgado) try to help her and her million-dollar Harry Winston collar get home. Rated: PG The scoop: Lots of talking dogs, little of anything else. Grade : * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS) Body of Lies What it's about: Leonardo DiCaprio's (above) deceptively rugged CIA agent masterminds the capture of a new world-class terrorist (Alon Abutbul)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 9, 2008
What Happens in Vegas is the kind of terrible mistake performers as big as Cameron Diaz and Ashton Kutcher usually make at the beginning of their careers, when they're anxious to break into the movies, or at the end, when they're struggling for a comeback. It's a screwed-up screwball farce about a slacker (Kutcher) and a go-getter (Diaz) who meet and get married one drunken night in Las Vegas. They win a $3 million jackpot with her quarter and his pull on a one-armed bandit and are sentenced to "six months hard marriage" when they try to get an annulment and sue each other for the money.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In the original cut of Clerks, writer-director Kevin Smith killed off a main character (a less-lethal ending was substituted before the movie hit theaters). In the commentary for a laser disc release of the movie, the indie stalwart says an accompanying music video is "as close to a Clerks sequel as you'll ever get." When Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back was released in 2001, bringing back the drug-dealing muses who serve as the Greek chorus for Clerks, he was widely quoted as saying that marked the last appearance by those characters.
FEATURES
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
Owen Wilson may be the only Oscar-nominated screenwriter who's never owned a computer. He's not going to take the plunge now at the advanced age of 37 because he's afraid he'd get addicted to computer games. "I'll look at these ads for these war games they have, and they look so cool." He elongates the word for effect. "I feel I could really lose myself." It's hard to reconcile the various faces of Wilson: the competitive devotee of pingpong, foosball, bocce and head soccer (soccer played on a tennis court)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 9, 2008
What Happens in Vegas is the kind of terrible mistake performers as big as Cameron Diaz and Ashton Kutcher usually make at the beginning of their careers, when they're anxious to break into the movies, or at the end, when they're struggling for a comeback. It's a screwed-up screwball farce about a slacker (Kutcher) and a go-getter (Diaz) who meet and get married one drunken night in Las Vegas. They win a $3 million jackpot with her quarter and his pull on a one-armed bandit and are sentenced to "six months hard marriage" when they try to get an annulment and sue each other for the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | January 27, 1995
Wild things happen when you shake booty with Julia Roberts. Not only do you turn into the "scorned" Lyle Lovett's nemesis, but you gain at least three notches on the American fame-o-meter. Last May, Ethan Hawke's name became checkout-line wallpaper after the "grunge hunk" was seen sipping champagne with the "pretty woman" at Lola's in Manhattan. The friendly business meal became Mr. Hawke's wake-up call to the world of tabloid caricature.Thanks to that overblown night with Ms. Roberts and a much-hyped Generation X movie called "Reality Bites," the spring of 1994 was a breakthrough season for the actor, 24. Now, like it or not, Mr. Hawke has been fingered as a generational icon, a latter-day Johnny Depp who has successfully segued from Teen Beatdom to Rolling Stone cool.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 30, 2005
Beautiful Losers, a fine exhibition of slacker art at the Contemporary Museum that highlights photography and video, brings to mind Matisse's question about whether the next generation of painters would carry forward the inspiration of Cezanne as he and Picasso had. Matisse lived just long enough to see the ascendancy of abstract-expressionism and the triumph of the New York School. Yet even the pioneering modernist who ended his career crafting whimsical paper cut-outs might not have despaired completely over Jackson Pollack's drip paintings or Warhol's silk-screened Marilyns and soup cans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | August 14, 2005
THE KING OF KINGS COUNTY By Whitney Terrell. Viking. 361 pages. Half coming-of-age tale and half tangled history of a modern American city, Terrell's second novel manages to be both intimate and epic. Narrated by a watchful 14-year-old named Jack Acheson, the book begins in the mid-1950s on the brink of a new era in Kansas City, Mo. Jack's father Alton, a schemer with big dreams but little cachet, is determined to cash in on the city's expansion when a new interstate highway transforms the outlying cornfields into suburbs.
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