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Skyline Drive

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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
The popular Skyline Drive in Virginia has been closed by fallen trees and snow since late January and will remain blocked several more weeks after its worst ice storms in decades.The road and its environs atop the Shenandoah National Park have lost thousands of trees and tree limbs in three separate storms in late January and February. No one has been reported hurt, but damage is estimated at $700,000."In 25 plus years here, I've never seen ice storms so severe and the road closed so long," said park spokesman Lyn Rothgeb.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
At Shenandoah National Park, visitors have options. Year-round they can take in the panoramic views of the 105-mile-long Skyline Drive that runs the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains and boasts more than 70 lookout points. And even in early spring, visitors can forgo their heated cars for an adventure on foot on any of the 510 miles of trails that offer views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Piedmont and the Shenandoah Valley. More than 100,000 visitors a year tackle the Old Rag trail, making it the park's most popular hike.
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FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 16, 1999
September's rains helped salvage the leaf-peeping season after the dry summer.Throughout the foliage season, numerous hot lines provide daily or weekly updates on color progression.For nationwide foliage updates from the U.S. Forest Service, call (800) 354-4595.For individual states:Connecticut: (800) CT-BOUND; www.ctbound.orgDelaware: (800) 441-8846; www.state.de.us/tourismMaine: (888) MAINE-45; www.visitmaine.comMaryland: (800) 532-8371; www.mdisfun.orgMassachusetts: (800) 227-MASS; www.massvacation.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | October 15, 2000
THAT INTENSELY wet summer this year brought some welcome relief for our flower beds and a reprieve for outdoor water-use bans in drier parts of Carroll County. It also helped a lot of farmers produce bumper grain crops, though the fruit and vegetable growers are moaning about too much rain, and corn and soybean prices are scraping bottom. But one of the bonuses of the abundant precipitation is now coming into full, glorious view. The vibrant colors of autumn leaves are beginning to peak, promising a spectacular display.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow | October 5, 1995
Tree experts have been debating the effect Maryland's long summer drought might have on the colorful riot of fall foliage.Prognosticators warned earlier that the autumn display might be disappointing, theorizing that stressed trees would conserve meager water supplies by shedding leaves prematurely.But more recent forecasts suggest late September rains and a return to seasonal weather will produce the usual or even superior displays.Maryland's fall foliage hot line, a toll-free telephone service, for example, suggested last weekend that conditions indicate "what could turn out to be one of the prettiest autumns on record" in Western Maryland.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
BIG MEADOWS, Va. -- Old-timers may remember such Depression-era terms as "Hoover blankets," "Hoover flags" and "Hoovervilles" or "Hoover camps."They were named for President Herbert C. Hoover, who was blamed for the unemployment and poverty caused by the Depression. "Hoover blankets" were old newspapers the homeless used to keep warm. The flags were empty pockets turned inside out. The 'villes and camps were shantytowns built by the unemployed.The Hoover camp hidden in the Blue Ridge Mountain woods here, however, was no village of tar-paper shacks.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez Reporters Sheridan Lyons and David Michael Ettlin of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 7, 1990
Our flag was still there yesterday, flying high over Fort McHenry, but you couldn't get inside to see it.Like dozens of other non-essential federal operations -- museums, parks and memorials -- Fort McHenry was closed to the public, a cash-short victim of the government's budget impasse.At midnight Friday, with no money budgeted for routine operations, all non-essential functions of the federal government stopped, including visitor services at the place that inspired the national anthem.One tourist who drove from Michigan arrived at the star-shaped fort to find, like everyone else who showed up yesterday, the gates locked and a sign stating: "Park Closed."
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF and ERNEST F. IMHOFF,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
FRONT ROYAL, Va. -- The Great Tree Blow-down in the Shenandoah National Park looks like a giant game of pickup sticks.Ice-laden branches broke, crashed and are tangled in each other. Trees were uprooted and lie willy-nilly. Limbs cracked apart and hang over roads and trails. Thousands of downed, bent branches -- like arrows in drawn bows -- wait to slap workmen trying to clear the way."This is like crawling around in barbed wire," said Bobby Lang, of Luray, Va., who was chain-sawing his way through a large scramble of limbs at the Indian Run Overlook on the Skyline Drive.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
LURAY, Va. -- Unknown to many Americans today, they were famous once as the CCC Boys, of a different time and of many different places.For $30 a month during the Great Depression, the 3.5 million young men of the Civilian Conservation Corps reshaped the contours of the United States. As the Tree Army, they planted maples by the millions, built national parks, fought forest fires and helped support their mothers and fathers.The unmarried 17- to 25-year-olds, from families on relief, lived in War Department camps.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | October 15, 2000
THAT INTENSELY wet summer this year brought some welcome relief for our flower beds and a reprieve for outdoor water-use bans in drier parts of Carroll County. It also helped a lot of farmers produce bumper grain crops, though the fruit and vegetable growers are moaning about too much rain, and corn and soybean prices are scraping bottom. But one of the bonuses of the abundant precipitation is now coming into full, glorious view. The vibrant colors of autumn leaves are beginning to peak, promising a spectacular display.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 16, 1999
September's rains helped salvage the leaf-peeping season after the dry summer.Throughout the foliage season, numerous hot lines provide daily or weekly updates on color progression.For nationwide foliage updates from the U.S. Forest Service, call (800) 354-4595.For individual states:Connecticut: (800) CT-BOUND; www.ctbound.orgDelaware: (800) 441-8846; www.state.de.us/tourismMaine: (888) MAINE-45; www.visitmaine.comMaryland: (800) 532-8371; www.mdisfun.orgMassachusetts: (800) 227-MASS; www.massvacation.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
BIG MEADOWS, Va. -- Old-timers may remember such Depression-era terms as "Hoover blankets," "Hoover flags" and "Hoovervilles" or "Hoover camps."They were named for President Herbert C. Hoover, who was blamed for the unemployment and poverty caused by the Depression. "Hoover blankets" were old newspapers the homeless used to keep warm. The flags were empty pockets turned inside out. The 'villes and camps were shantytowns built by the unemployed.The Hoover camp hidden in the Blue Ridge Mountain woods here, however, was no village of tar-paper shacks.
FEATURES
By Thomas H. Bauer and Thomas H. Bauer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
In the forest primeval; My favorite placeMidway through our vacation in Costa Rica, my wife and I decided to hike to Santo Cristo Falls. Driving up into the mountains from the Pacific Coast, we eventually located the steep, narrow, dirt road that led to the trail head in the valley below. Being fiscal-minded travelers, we had booked our trip during the period between the rainy season and the high (dry) season. The cheaper rates and uncrowded parks were balanced out by a little mud in the backcountry.
FEATURES
By Chester R. Frazier and Chester R. Frazier,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 1998
Deer dispel complaints; MY FAVORITE PLACELast year for Memorial Day weekend, I rented a room in a lodge at Big Meadows, one of the most popular areas along Skyline Drive. I wanted a weekend away from the city and a chance for our family to enjoy the serene beauty of nature. I especially wanted our two boys - Max, age 2, and Jackson, age 6 - to enjoy the mountains as much as I do.In years past, I have hiked and camped many times along SkylineDrive between Thornton Gap and Big Meadows, including the Appalachian Trail.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF and ERNEST F. IMHOFF,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
FRONT ROYAL, Va. -- The Great Tree Blow-down in the Shenandoah National Park looks like a giant game of pickup sticks.Ice-laden branches broke, crashed and are tangled in each other. Trees were uprooted and lie willy-nilly. Limbs cracked apart and hang over roads and trails. Thousands of downed, bent branches -- like arrows in drawn bows -- wait to slap workmen trying to clear the way."This is like crawling around in barbed wire," said Bobby Lang, of Luray, Va., who was chain-sawing his way through a large scramble of limbs at the Indian Run Overlook on the Skyline Drive.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
The popular Skyline Drive in Virginia has been closed by fallen trees and snow since late January and will remain blocked several more weeks after its worst ice storms in decades.The road and its environs atop the Shenandoah National Park have lost thousands of trees and tree limbs in three separate storms in late January and February. No one has been reported hurt, but damage is estimated at $700,000."In 25 plus years here, I've never seen ice storms so severe and the road closed so long," said park spokesman Lyn Rothgeb.
NEWS
By John T. Starr | August 26, 1991
MY FAMILY used to spend a week or two every summer in Shenandoah National Park or its immediate vicinity. We stayed at Skyland, just off Skyline Drive in the park, or at a farm in a small pocket valley west of Swift Run Gap.Our days were filled with walking the trails in the park, climbing Stony Man and Hawksbill mountains, descending to Dark Hollow and Whiteoak falls and looking for deer and other wildlife. Some days we would drive the length of the Skyline Drive, down to where it joins the Blue Ridge Parkway.
FEATURES
By Chester R. Frazier and Chester R. Frazier,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 1998
Deer dispel complaints; MY FAVORITE PLACELast year for Memorial Day weekend, I rented a room in a lodge at Big Meadows, one of the most popular areas along Skyline Drive. I wanted a weekend away from the city and a chance for our family to enjoy the serene beauty of nature. I especially wanted our two boys - Max, age 2, and Jackson, age 6 - to enjoy the mountains as much as I do.In years past, I have hiked and camped many times along SkylineDrive between Thornton Gap and Big Meadows, including the Appalachian Trail.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
LURAY, Va. -- Unknown to many Americans today, they were famous once as the CCC Boys, of a different time and of many different places.For $30 a month during the Great Depression, the 3.5 million young men of the Civilian Conservation Corps reshaped the contours of the United States. As the Tree Army, they planted maples by the millions, built national parks, fought forest fires and helped support their mothers and fathers.The unmarried 17- to 25-year-olds, from families on relief, lived in War Department camps.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1997
When I was growing up, on Sunday mornings in the fall, my family would come home from church, change clothes and pile back in the car.Before most people had finished reading their morning paper, we'd be heading off to the great outdoors.My father would quietly nose his silver Mercury Cougar through what seemed like a suburban wasteland at that time of day, the streets and strip malls eerily empty at 8 a.m.The farther we got from Rockville, the more relaxed Dad became. We were never quite sure where we were going on those early morning jaunts or if he even had a destination in mind.
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