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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Transamerica Life Insurance Co. has begun putting up its namesake sign at 100 Light St., transforming Baltimore's skyline once again. About 800 employees of the arm of Dutch insurer Aegon are expected to move from the firm's current midtown Baltimore offices to Transamerica Tower over the next several months. The move fills a void in the building left behind by Legg Mason, which moved its employees to a new structure in Harbor East in 2009. Transamerica agreed last year to lease the top nine floors, or about 171,000 square feet, of the 35-story skyscraper.
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BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
HarborView Towers, a condominium complex on the Inner Harbor, aims to become an iconic part of the Baltimore skyline now that it has revamped the beacon atop its east tower. "[It's] new and exciting, and I think people are just going to love it," said John Cochran, president of the council of unit owners at HarborView Towers. The new beacon on the building off Key Highway uses energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, which are not only environmentally friendly and cost-efficient, but offer the opportunity for ever-changing displays.
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BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
HarborView Towers, a condominium complex on the Inner Harbor, aims to become an iconic part of the Baltimore skyline now that it has revamped the beacon atop its east tower. "[It's] new and exciting, and I think people are just going to love it," said John Cochran, president of the council of unit owners at HarborView Towers. The new beacon on the building off Key Highway uses energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, which are not only environmentally friendly and cost-efficient, but offer the opportunity for ever-changing displays.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
In a sign of renewed interest in Baltimore's downtown business district, more companies are looking to boost their visibility by splashing names and logos atop prominent Inner Harbor office towers. In recent months, R2integrated, Lupin Pharmaceuticals and First National Bank joined the other banks and financial firms that announce their presence on the buildings they lease or own. "For companies that are up and coming, it's a signal that they've arrived," said Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.
NEWS
October 29, 1994
The big day is almost here.In just a few more days, the gilded Maryland National tower -- now renamed after its new owner, NationsBank -- will be lit up. An Art Deco gem will be illuminated as never before.There is more to come:On New Year's Eve, the World Trade Center overlooking the Inner Harbor will become a giant, permanent candle, when its 28-story tower will be bathed in light. On a clear night, it ought to be visible for up to 10 miles, serving as a lighthouse to those approaching Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The downtown Baltimore skyline is about to change. The name of the defunct Examiner newspaper will no longer adorn the building at 400 E. Pratt St., visible throughout the Inner Harbor. Instead, the name of digital marketing firm R2integrated will go up on the Commerce Street side of the building in mid-October. For more than a year, R2integrated has been subleasing the building's 11th floor, which had been vacated by the Baltimore Examiner. The free newspaper ceased publication in 2009 after less than three years in the market.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 22, 2001
After days of looking at pictures of the beleaguered New York skyline, I decided I'd had enough. On a spectacularly clear fall afternoon, I took off for our own harbor and gazed across the Patapsco River. It was a calming, inspiring experience. My guide for this little Sunday afternoon excursion was my father, who suggested that we get out of the house, leave Charles Village, take in a few new sights, maybe have lunch. One of the maddening delights of old Baltimore is that you'd better know the place well or you'll never find the greatest stories the city has to offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lola Alapo and Lola Alapo,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
NEW YORK -- Gol Berna Ozcan, a Turkish woman visiting from London, walked through the museum gallery to a painting of Manhattan in profile, then leaned forward and stared intently. "It looks like a beautiful piece of jewelry," she said, her brow knitted. "It's almost a mystical feeling to see the skyline." Just then, her son, Avram, 5, ran up and declared proudly, "I went up the World Trade Center when I was a baby!" If Avram and his mother are any indication, the reverence accorded the city's skyline has only heightened with the destruction of its crown, the twin towers.
NEWS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2006
A glass skyscraper soaring 59 stories and 717 feet would become Baltimore's tallest building, with a distinctive, slender shape that would dominate the city's skyline, under a concept approved yesterday by the city's design panel. The tower would rise in the shape of a parallelogram on Light Street between the Hyatt Regency and Harbor Court hotels. It would contain luxury condominiums and a boutique hotel atop street-level shops, restaurants and parking. It would be nearly 200 feet higher than the Legg Mason Building at 100 Light St., now the city's tallest.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
A start-up insurance company that promises to offer more affordable insurance policies to city residents and small businesses will announce today that it plans to begin operations in mid-summer of 2001. American Skyline Insurance Co., with headquarters at 14 Light St. in Baltimore, will offer standard personal and commercial insurance coverage to customers in Baltimore and Washington, including policies for automobile owners, homeowners and small business owners, said the company's chief executive officer, Earnest E. Hines.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The downtown Baltimore skyline is about to change. The name of the defunct Examiner newspaper will no longer adorn the building at 400 E. Pratt St., visible throughout the Inner Harbor. Instead, the name of digital marketing firm R2integrated will go up on the Commerce Street side of the building in mid-October. For more than a year, R2integrated has been subleasing the building's 11th floor, which had been vacated by the Baltimore Examiner. The free newspaper ceased publication in 2009 after less than three years in the market.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
The proposal offered by letter writer Steve English to tear down the Baltimore Hilton has to be the dumbest idea going ("Orioles fans can finance Hilton tear-down," July 2). I am an Orioles fan and don't care about the view of the skyline at Camden Yards. Steve, do you go to the game to look at the skyline or watch the game? I watch the game. Others can go sit on Federal Hill and look at the skyline and save money on Orioles tickets. Why should we contribute to tearing down Gov. Martin O'Malley's white elephant that should not have been built to begin with?
NEWS
July 2, 2013
I read with interest the recent article which describes the financial woes of the Hilton Baltimore ("Hilton again loses millions," June 27). It seems that while the hotel is generating enough income to cover operating expenses, it can't make its debt payments. So it's not enough that this monstrosity of a building is a hideously ugly example of Soviet-style "architecture. " It's not enough that it blocks the view of the city skyline that we used to enjoy at Camden Yards. Now, the only way for it to survive is for the city to dip into the general fund so that the hotel can continue to operate at a loss on the taxpayers' dime.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | November 7, 2012
Sitting atop the Belvedere like a brilliant Christmas ornament, the recently renovated 13th Floor will likely impress first-timers the moment its elevator doors open to the intimate space. First, they'll wonder: Is this view really of Baltimore? Then: Is this bar really in Baltimore? Aesthetically, the 13th Floor is that beautiful. The low-lit room feels illuminated - just enough - by the countless number of lights dotting downtown outside. But its lighting and dark decor keep the mood romantic, in a non-showy way. On a recent Friday night, a crowd of 25 quietly conversed and sipped expensive cocktails as a piano player provided a smooth, barely-there jazz soundtrack.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Each one weighs as much as 9,000 Tony Siragusas (the former Ravens defensive lineman) and at full extension rises as high as Baltimore's World Trade Center. Together, the port's four new cargo cranes are about to make a splash on the city's skyline. But first the gleaming white cranes, worth $40 million, must be rolled off the ship that brought them from China — without a splash. Coaxing them from the Zhen Hua 13 onto the dock requires delicate planning and brute force. Engineers and ironworkers at Seagirt Marine Terminal in Baltimore's port have already unloaded two of the cranes and are ready to move the final two before the month is out. On Sunday, the first crane came rolling off. On Tuesday morning, the second crane crept across the ship's deck on railroad tracks and crossed the 8-foot watery gap between the ship and its berth.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Exelon Corp.'s pledge to build a new Baltimore headquarters as part of its proposed buyout of Constellation Energy could alter the city's skyline, injecting fresh life into the traditional downtown business district or further expanding the waterfront corporate center east of the harbor. While Exelon is not revealing its short list of possible sites for the new building, local real estate brokers and others have identified several attractive potential locations, including some in the core business center and one between Harbor East and Fells Point.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
The skyline of Baltimore is changing yet again. And whether your vantage point is Camden Yards, Federal Hill or Little Italy, not everyone is pleased with the view. A drive along Key Highway nowadays has the claustrophobic feel of a concrete canyon, the facades of new waterfront residences walling off the harbor. From Little Italy, the eye stumbles over a collection of apartment towers en route to the water. Then there's the constricted view from Camden Yards, a field of vision compromised by the imposing new convention center hotel.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
American Skyline Insurance Co., launched four years ago with exuberant backing from Baltimore leaders concerned that high auto insurance premiums were driving residents from the city, has been halted by state regulators from taking additional policies because of financial problems. The order from the Maryland Insurance Administration forbids American Skyline from renewing current policies when they expire. It remains in effect until the company can prove it is financially solvent. The state insurance commissioner said the company couldn't support its operating costs after losing $27 million in roughly three years and the loss of its lead investor.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Transamerica Life Insurance Co. has begun putting up its namesake sign at 100 Light St., transforming Baltimore's skyline once again. About 800 employees of the arm of Dutch insurer Aegon are expected to move from the firm's current midtown Baltimore offices to Transamerica Tower over the next several months. The move fills a void in the building left behind by Legg Mason, which moved its employees to a new structure in Harbor East in 2009. Transamerica agreed last year to lease the top nine floors, or about 171,000 square feet, of the 35-story skyscraper.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
I can recall a time in the late 1970s when the Inner Harbor was a wasteland and the city's skyline was a line of frightening black silhouettes. We have the vision of William Donald Schaefer, the man I have always referred to as our "crazy uncle" mayor, to thank for remaking the Inner Harbor into a national treasure. May he rest in peace. Jaye Dansicker, Sparks
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