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By MIKE LITTWIN | June 15, 1992
Maybe you remember the famous exchange between Fitzgerald and Hemingway on the subject of the wealthy class. Here's the updated version.Fitzgerald: The rich are different from us.Hemingway: Yes, they have more sky boxes.My ticket (actually a guest pass) said Suite 11. During the last homestand, a rich person invited me to a Camden Yards sky box. Why? Could it be because I had begged like a dog for an invitation in a previous column?In any case, I waltzed over to the elevator -- the exclusive elevator, where they, shall we say, separate the wheat from the chaff.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2000
With one important deadline missed and another approaching, Aberdeen's $25.7 million baseball complex remains a field of dreams. Ground has not been broken for the 6,000-seat Ripken Stadium, planned as the home of the Aberdeen Arsenal minor league team and a youth baseball academy. A July 15 deadline to begin construction of the complex -- which officials hope will generate millions in tourism dollars -- has come and gone. Concern is growing as Aug. 15 nears, the new date to begin turning the 100-acre pasture into a park for the new expansion team in the Atlantic League.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff Marina Sarris contributed to this story | February 28, 1991
A state legislator wants the Maryland Stadium Authority to explain how it will pay for 60 luxury sky boxes now being built into the Camden Yards baseball stadium because those costs were omitted from the original financing plan.Del. Howard P. Rawlings, D-City, an appropriations subcommittee chairman, asked the authority to submit by this week a written plan of how the suites will be financed.A state report said last week that the authority "does not have the estimated $4 million needed to construct and furnish the boxes without using all of its remaining contingency funds," said legislative budget analyst Ann Marie Zalewski.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Kevin Langbaum contributed to this article | August 4, 1996
It's got no club seats, sky boxes or baked salmon appetizers. And the view over the bleachers is of rowhouses, not skyscrapers.And by the fourth quarter the ancient plumbing was thoroughly overwhelmed.But few of the more than 63,804 fans who turned out for Memorial Stadium's shakedown cruise last night seemed to mind. It was Baltimore NFL football, back where it all began 46 years ago."It brings back memories, happy memories," said Ravens owner Art Modell.He recalled the great games and players he watched over the years as visiting owner of the Cleveland Browns, from Raymond Berry to Jimmy Orr. His favorite: a bruising 1971 game in the mud in which Browns quarterback Bill Nelsen harassed the Colts with passes to Fair Hooker, winning 14-13 and leaving the field badly scarred for the World Series a few weeks later.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
The proposed Washington Redskins stadium at Laurel, loaded with an unprecedented number of cash-generating sky boxes and luxury seats, could transform the team into one of the richest in sports with revenues of $100 million or more a year, according to unofficial projections.In fact, if the team maintained its sellout tradition in the new facility and could lease all of its luxury seats -- two big ifs -- it could make almost as much money at the privately funded Laurel stadium as at the publicly funded one proposed for an expansion team in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
The prospect, a no-nonsense executive in a pinstripe suit, has seen the multicolored charts and read the glossy brochures. Now he wants some nuts and bolts:Where will the sun shine during the game? On which side of the stadium will the home team be based? And will renting a sky box enhance his chances of procuring the prestigious scoreboard advertising rights?This brings the hit squad -- two senior representatives of Baltimore's NFL expansion effort -- to their feet. Hunched over their charts in a conference room in the USF&G building they try to project solar trajectories, the predilections of a future coach and how sponsorship bidding will go.It works.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
Proposed changes in tax law now heading through Congress would lessen the advantages of renting luxury suites at sporting events at the same time that Baltimore and four other NFL-hopeful cities are trying to market more than $250 million worth of the pricey seats.But customers don't seem to mind: All of the cities that have begun collecting commitments on the seats report brisk sales.President Clinton's economic plan, already passed by the House and now before the Senate, calls for a reduction in the amount of entertainment spending that can be deducted from income taxes as a business expense.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 9, 1993
All the stars will not be on the field Tuesday night. Nope, stars of film, sports and business will be enjoying themselves in the luxurious sky boxes at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Dottie and Henry Rosenberg will be joined in Crown Central Petroleum's sky box by the Drayton McLaine family, he's the owner of the Houston Astros; and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Africk, he's the retired chairman of U. S. Tobacco, who sits on Crown Central's board of directors.Nearby, BG&E executives Chris Poindexter, George McGowan and his wife, Carol, and Mike Chesser and his wife, Susan, will entertain CEOs Roger Penny, Bethlehem Steel; J. P. Bolduc, WR Grace; and Dick Lindner, Westinghouse.
NEWS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
Initially reluctant to join the NFL's premium-seat campaign, Baltimore yesterday became the first expansion finalist to lease all of its sky box suites.Not surprisingly, the mood among the city's expansion organizers ranged from triumphant to ecstatic."It's important to the extent it confirms what we've been telling the NFL," said Herbert J. Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority. "That is that the market is here, that we could sell out our premium seating."We were opposed to the campaign at first, but the NFL wanted to determine whether we were able to back up our commitment.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Drake Witham, Sandra McKee and Buster Olney contributed to this article | December 5, 1995
In terms of luxury seating at sporting events, the Baltimore-Washington area is about to become the most luxurious of all.With the Redskins stadium announced yesterday for Prince George's County, and the MCI Center already under construction in downtown Washington, Oriole Park and the planned Browns stadium in Baltimore, there soon will be a staggering 30,625 club seats and 573 sky boxes for rent.That will almost certainly be the nation's highest concentration of the pricey seats."It seems pretty obvious that there is going to be a lot of competition for club seat and suite holders," said Marc Ganis, the owner of SportsCorp, and Chicago-based sports consulting firm.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Drake Witham, Sandra McKee and Buster Olney contributed to this article | December 5, 1995
In terms of luxury seating at sporting events, the Baltimore-Washington area is about to become the most luxurious of all.With the Redskins stadium announced yesterday for Prince George's County, and the MCI Center already under construction in downtown Washington, Oriole Park and the planned Browns stadium in Baltimore, there soon will be a staggering 30,625 club seats and 573 sky boxes for rent.That will almost certainly be the nation's highest concentration of the pricey seats."It seems pretty obvious that there is going to be a lot of competition for club seat and suite holders," said Marc Ganis, the owner of SportsCorp, and Chicago-based sports consulting firm.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- The Bayfront Center sits white and glistening in the Florida sun, across Bayfront Drive from the Gulf of Mexico. Inside the building is a familiar, harried man.Kenny Cooper, the man who brought professional indoor soccer to Baltimore 15 years ago, is in the midst of doing it all over again in this quiet, slow-paced city that, with its sister city, Tampa, is being shaken awake by a sports revolution.Since the Tampa Bay Terror of the National Professional Soccer League announced its arrival, Major League Baseball has announced it will expand here; Major League Soccer, the new professional outdoor league, announced it will come here, and campaigns have begun to sell sky boxes for the NHL, NFL and baseball teams.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- If it were a car, the new arena planned for downtown Washington would have "loaded!" written in big letters across the windshield: sky boxes, high-rent club seats, two cafes, a museum, glassy exterior. Some seats will even have their own interactive television sets, from which fans may be able to order Bullets tickets and Capitals sweat shirts."It will be the most technologically advanced building in the world," gushed Abe Pollin, who intends to break ground next month on the MCI Center and have his Washington Capitals and Bullets playing there by fall of 1997.
SPORTS
June 15, 1995
Doug Jones,OriolesHis favorite ballparks:1. El Paso (Double-A), old Dudley Field. "It was a lot of fun to play there. It was kind of a small park, a double outfield wall. The announcer was nuts, and he never stopped talking."2. Vancouver (Triple-A), Nat Bailey Stadium. "A pitcher's ballpark. The ball just didn't travel at all. The fans were right on top of you."3. Camden Yards. "There are a lot of people there, which makes it a lot of fun to play. Jacobs Field is like that, too, all the new ballparks."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
The likely sale of the Toronto Blue Jays, announced yesterday, may answer one of the more compelling questions in sports: Will the Orioles go down in history as the most expensive baseball team?The $173 million price paid for the Orioles in 1993 was a record for a sports franchise. The NFL Eagles and Buccaneers have since been sold for more, but no baseball team with a comparable revenue potential has been put on the block until now.Belgian brewer Interbrew announced yesterday a $2.9 billion, friendly takeover of beer and entertainment giant John Labatt Ltd. and said it plans to sell Labatt's non-beer operations, including: the Blue Jays, the Canadian Football League Argonauts, sports television network TSN and a stake in Toronto's SkyDome.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
Football fans who put down deposits on club seats and sky boxes at Baltimore's proposed NFL stadium will be offered their money or another six months of waiting in letters being sent out today by officials of Baltimore's failed NFL expansion effort.The fans put down more than $8 million in deposits on 100 sky boxes and 7,500 club seats as part of an NFL-designed test of market strength that ended in August 1993. Similar drives were conducted in the other four cities vying for the two expansion teams awarded a year ago: Memphis, Tenn.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 1, 1993
Remember Sept. 3?That was the absolute, inviolable, non-negotiable deadline facing the five cities trying to lure an NFL expansion team. By that date, they were to stop selling sky boxes and premium seats as part of a league-designed, two-month test marketing campaign.Baltimore started on the scheduled July 1 kickoff and sold out about a week before the deadline. Charlotte, N.C., geared up weeks in advance, but accepted no checks before July 1 or after the Labor Day weekend. Jacksonville, Fla., and Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | March 29, 1992
If it seems as if the fans in one of the sky boxes at the new stadium appear to be having a little more fun than the rest on Opening Day, they probably are.Stuffed between corporate executives and their clients, salesmen and their customers, and bosses and their employees, will be Burton L. Bank and 10 of his golfing buddies.The group is one of a handful of non-corporate groups that leased a luxury box.The Orioles have nearly sold out their "private suites," which have become important money makers for teams and are among the reasons a new stadium was built.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
Football fans who put down deposits in last summer's drive to lease sky boxes and club seats at the proposed NFL stadium are being asked to let the money ride a little longer while the city tries to get a team.About $6 million of the $8 million collected during the two-month, NFL-designed sales blitz remains in interest-bearing escrow accounts, and local NFL organizers want to keep it through the end of the year. The deposits, on 100 sky boxes and 7,500 club seats, were intended to demonstrate the city's football fanaticism as part of its bid for an expansion team.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
Football fans who put down deposits in last summer's drive to lease sky boxes and club seats at the proposed NFL stadium are being asked to let the money ride a little longer while the city tries to get a team.About $6 million of the $8 million collected during the two-month, NFL-designed sales blitz remains in interest-bearing escrow accounts, and local NFL organizers want to keep it through the end of the year. The deposits, on 100 sky boxes and 7,500 club seats, were intended to demonstrate the city's football fanaticism as part of its bid for an expansion team.
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