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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
ST. MICHAELS -- Nearly six months after the bay's oldest working skipjack was salvaged after sinking in a gale off Tilghman Island, a Maryland task force has outlined plans for rescuing the dozen or so wooden survivors of a fleet of sailing oyster dredgers that once dominated the Chesapeake. Included among a range of recommendations presented yesterday by the 15-member panel appointed by state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer are proposals for easing restrictions on harvesting the shellfish, creating a permanent restoration and maintenance program at Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, and providing insurance and low-interest loans.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
Nearly four months after hoisting the bay's oldest working skipjack from 10 feet of water near the mouth of the Choptank River, Capt. Wade H. "Wadey" Murphy Jr. wants to go back to work scraping the bottom of the Chesapeake for oysters and hauling tourists out for educational tours and sunset cruises. He thinks he's found a way to pay for it. Strapped for cash to complete the $50,000 to $60,000 restoration of the 114-year-old Rebecca T. Ruark, which sank in a November gale, Murphy is counting on the home-grown marketing know-how that in recent years has helped him use the traditional skills of a waterman to take advantage of a burgeoning tourist trade.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
TILGHMAN ISLAND -- Battered, but afloat for the first time in three days, the 113-year-old Rebecca T. Ruark was a sight for the sore eyes of Captain Wade H. "Wadey" Murphy Jr., who waited anxiously for hours yesterday as a marine salvage crew gingerly worked to recover the historic vessel from the Choptank River."
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
TILGHMAN ISLAND -- The Chesapeake Bay's oldest working skipjack is lying beneath 14 feet of water near the mouth of the Choptank River.A portion of the mast and the outline of the 113-year-old Rebecca T. Ruark are visible above the heaving waves on Harris Creek. The bow is buried in sand and muck. Loaded with nearly three tons of lead ballast that shifted to the starboard side, the ship will remain pinned to the bottom until calmer winds allow an Annapolis marine salvage company to retrieve the 52-foot sailing vessel for repairs.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
The 113-year-old skipjack Rebecca T. Ruark sank in rough waters and high winds yesterday after a successful day of oystering about 2 miles off Tilghman Island.Captain Wade Murphy Jr. and three crew members out of Crisfield were rescued by Tilghman Island neighbors about 5 p.m. as the Ruark filled with water when a wind storm knocked out its sails and it sprang a leak.No one was injured, although the day's harvest of some 60 bushels of oysters was lost.This morning, divers will try to raise the $100,000 skipjack -- one of fewer than a dozen of the rake-masted vessels left on Tilghman -- out of 20 feet of water near Bar Neck.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
ABOARD THE NORMAN STANLEY -- The name of the skipjack docked at Annapolis' City Dock is actually the Stanley Norman. But on our recent cruise, my son called it the Norman Stanley and he's my son, so the name stuck, so there.We had come to receive an education."Participants can sail, haul in oysters, and pull trawls for fish," says a brochure from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. "We'll also learn more about measures under way to restore the Chesapeake's oyster stocks." The foundation, which owns the decommissioned skipjack, offers its members educational cruises on the storied sloop.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
When Bandits owner Mike Caggiano, interviewed on radio, was asked if he were committed to the Baltimore Arena `f indefinitely, he answered: "No. I'm not in business to lose as much money as we will playing downtown."Tom Ebright, who owned the Baltimore Skipjacks before transferring to Portland, Maine, said he used to lose about $300,000 per year here. Caggiano says, "We lose much more than that these days."Where has he been?* For a guy who has a year in the AHL under his belt, Providence Bruins coach Bob Francis said a strange thing about a 1-2 weekend.
SPORTS
August 30, 1996
BaseballAngels: Designated P Kyle Abbott to Triple-A Vancouver.Red Sox: Claimed ex-Orioles 3B Jeff Manto off waivers from Mariners. Optioned P Brent Knackert to Triple-A Pawtucket. Designated C Alex Delgado for assignment.Rockies: Purchased contract of SS Neifi Perez from Triple-A Colorado Springs.BasketballSpurs: Signed G Vernon Maxwell.WNBA: Named Carol Blazejowski director of basketball development.CollegeLoyola: Named Tim Sorboro assistant men's basketball coach and Angela Rutledge assistant women's volleyball coach.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
The Minnie V takes to the waters this summer with tourists on weekends and students on weekdays, the newest twist in Inner Harbor fare and the latest addition to the fleet of the Living Classrooms Foundation.Under Capt. Louis Rosenberg, the newly refurbished skipjack undertakes several programs for the public with a spruced-up deck, hull and railing and a new boom.From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, the skipjack will run 90-minute, walk-on sails from the Inner Harbor Amphitheatre next to the Constellation.
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 1996
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Reggie Savage hopes he's not forgotten in Baltimore.The forward began his pro hockey career with the Baltimore Skipjacks in 1990, and he starred with the team until it moved to Portland, Maine, in 1993.Savage was a local hero. Skipjacks jerseys bearing his name and No. 7 could be found on fans all around the Baltimore Arena. The 15th overall selection in the 1988 draft was supposed to be the offensive whiz the Washington Capitals so desperately needed.It never worked out that way. Savage played in 17 NHL games with Washington and endured a bitter tenure in the Quebec/Colorado organization.
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