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Skin Cancer

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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
House Speaker Michael E. Busch was treated this week for what he called a non life-threatening form of skin cancer -- a condition he attributes largely to his years of work as a lifeguard at a time when sunblock was less effective and often went unused. Busch revealed the treatment, which involved cutting away an affected patch of skin on his leg,  during an interview on an unrelated topic. He said the condition is a basal cell cancer that is neither malignant nor life-threatening.
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NEWS
February 23, 2014
Thanks for your recent editorial supporting a ban on indoor tanning by minors ("Ban the booth," Jan. 20). As a melanoma survivor, I know the pain and uncertainty of going through treatment for that illness. My melanoma was probably caused by years of being in the outdoors as a kid before sunscreen was even invented. I am grateful for the treatment I received at Johns Hopkins Hospital that saved my life, and I now volunteer for the American Cancer Society to help others fight cancer.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 11, 2012
Two new government studies show young people are still putting themselves at risk for skin cancer by getting sunburned and going to indoor tanning beds. One study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that half of those aged 18 to 29 had at least one sunburn it the past year, though they were increasingly using sunscreen, seeking shade and wearing protective clothing. The other study by the National Cancer Institute found 32 percent of those 18 to 21 were going to indoor tanning salons and 30 percent of those 22 to 25 were.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
A form parents must sign before their children use indoor tanning devices will warn that the practice can cause skin cancer and possibly death under a new policy state health officials adopted Friday. "Indoor tanning can cause skin cancer. Skin cancer can be fatal," the statement reads. "To reduce the risk of skin cancer, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children under 18 never use tanning devices. " The language was adopted after two rounds of public comment on revisions.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 1, 2012
Baltimore Ravens Offensive Coordinator Cam Cameron was a young coach at the University of Michigan when his then head coach Bo Schembechler noticed a spot on his back. The spot turned out to be a malignant mole and Cameron was diagnosed with stage 2 melanoma. Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Cameron was treated and survived and is now speaking out about skin cancer. He will be featured in a 30-second public service announcement for the Joanna M. Nicolay Melanoma Foundation, a national nonprofit headquartered in Maryland that promoted melanoma research and prevention.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
The Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology, in partnership with The Kropfelder Foundation for Melanoma Education and Research, has teamed up with Ripken Baseball to help eradicate skin cancer, according to a news release. On Saturday, Johns Hopkins dermatologists will provide complimentary skin screenings at the Ripken Baseball complex in Aberdeen during the Father's Day weekend baseball tournament. Players, coaches, and family members will have the opportunity to get a free cancer screening and learn about ways to prevent skin cancer.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 26, 2012
The Baltimore Ravens will offer free skin cancer screenings before tomorrow night's game against the Cleveland Browns to help raise awareness about melanoma, the most common kind of skin cancer. Melanoma kills one American every hour, but can almost always be cured if caught early. Maryland ranks 11th in the country for incidence levels of the disease. Screening tets will bet set up from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. before the game at M&T Bank Stadium . The screenings will be done by licensed dermatologists.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Sherrie Walter will never wear earrings again, but recently started styling her hair in a ponytail the way she used to before she was diagnosed with skin cancer nearly four years ago. It's a big step for Walter, whose life was turned upside down when doctors finally figured out the persistent sore in her ear was actually basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of cancer. By then it had spread so much that the Bel Air mother of two had to have part of her skull and most of her left ear removed.
FEATURES
By Jacqueline Stenson and Jacqueline Stenson,Medical Tribune News Service | July 19, 1995
The more sunburns you've suffered, the more likely you are to develop a type of skin cancer -- and the number of sunburns you've had is a stronger predictor than skin type of your cancer risk, according to a new report.In a study of 107,900 predominantly white women who were followed for eight years, those who had six or more sunburns in their lifetime had more than twice the risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma than women who had never been burned.As the number of sunburns in a lifetime increased, so did a person's cancer risk, the researchers reported today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski PTC and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski PTC,Medical Tribune News Service | July 12, 1994
Summer brings an exodus outdoors, to all the enjoyable recreational activities available and to exposure to sunlight and its radiation.This radiation, besides causing collagen damage and aging the skin, is the main cause of skin cancer, the most common form of cancer. Even though men are more likely to develop skin cancer, increasing numbers of women in their 20s and 30s are being diagnosed with the disease.Skin cancer is expected to affect about 1 million Americans this year, equal to all other cancers combined.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green | July 25, 2013
Just a few serious sunburns can increase your child's risk of skin cancer later in life. Annapolis-based Snapper Rock (snapperrock.com) offers a line of colorful and stylish UV50+ swimwear for children ages 0-12, from swimsuits and board shorts to hats and cover-ups. The sun protection comes not from chemically treating the fabric, but from the density of the weave and the nylon and elastane blend, which blocks 98 percent of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
I am a member of the baby oil generation. Half a century ago, we spent our summers at the pool, slick with a kind of fluid magnifying glass that turned our skin red, then brown. You wouldn't have been caught dead without a suntan back in the day. And you were in a hurry to get it done so you would spend the rest of the summer glowing in your sundresses and your two-piece bathing suits. There was an art to "laying out," as we called it. We were so focused on rotating our exposure to the sun - like rotisserie chickens on a spit - that we barely paid attention to the boys.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 11, 2013
Administration UMBC's Brown wins Under Armour AD of the Year Award UMBC athletic director Charles Brown has been named a Division I-AAA Under Armour Athletics Director of the Year Award recipient by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Brown will be honored at the NACDA and Affiliates Convention Week on June 15 at the World Center Marriott Resort in Orlando, Fla. The Under Armour AD of the Year Award was created to honor intercollegiate athletics directors for their commitment and administrative excellence within a campus or college community environment.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
The Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology, in partnership with The Kropfelder Foundation for Melanoma Education and Research, has teamed up with Ripken Baseball to help eradicate skin cancer, according to a news release. On Saturday, Johns Hopkins dermatologists will provide complimentary skin screenings at the Ripken Baseball complex in Aberdeen during the Father's Day weekend baseball tournament. Players, coaches, and family members will have the opportunity to get a free cancer screening and learn about ways to prevent skin cancer.
NEWS
September 26, 2012
WEATHER The National Weather Service is calling for Wednesday to be cloudy, with a high near 83 and a 70 percent chance of precipitation. Wednesday night is expected to be cloudy, with a low around 66 and a 60 percent chance of precipitation. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT Kamenetz blames Recher for weekend Towson melee : Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz blamed the Recher Theatre on Tuesday for a weekend event that drew unruly crowds to downtown Towson, where several police officers were injured and one man was shot.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 26, 2012
The Baltimore Ravens will offer free skin cancer screenings before tomorrow night's game against the Cleveland Browns to help raise awareness about melanoma, the most common kind of skin cancer. Melanoma kills one American every hour, but can almost always be cured if caught early. Maryland ranks 11th in the country for incidence levels of the disease. Screening tets will bet set up from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. before the game at M&T Bank Stadium . The screenings will be done by licensed dermatologists.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | May 23, 1994
To promote National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Harbor Hospital Center is having a program, "Answers to the Burning Questions," at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Gruehn Auditorium.The program will focus attention on skin cancer, the most common type of cancer among U.S. residents. Anyone over the age of 15 can get skin cancer. The one-hour session will be followed with a question-and-answer period.Several informational brochures about skin cancer will be available.For more information, call 347-2563.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | May 29, 2008
Warm weather is here at last. But before you hit the beach or the tennis courts or head for the pool, make sure you've taken precautions to protect yourself from the sun's searing rays, says Dr. Oanh Lauring, a dermatologist at Mercy Medical Center. Who is at risk for skin cancer? Anyone who is exposed to the sun, but those at highest risk are patients with fair skin. So typically blonds, people with red hair, blue eyes or fair skin to start with are at increased risk. But black people need sunscreen, too. They do burn, and if you are someone who has any kind of dark marks or discolored skin such as acne or other darker areas, those areas need protection as well.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Sherrie Walter will never wear earrings again, but recently started styling her hair in a ponytail the way she used to before she was diagnosed with skin cancer nearly four years ago. It's a big step for Walter, whose life was turned upside down when doctors finally figured out the persistent sore in her ear was actually basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of cancer. By then it had spread so much that the Bel Air mother of two had to have part of her skull and most of her left ear removed.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 11, 2012
Two new government studies show young people are still putting themselves at risk for skin cancer by getting sunburned and going to indoor tanning beds. One study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that half of those aged 18 to 29 had at least one sunburn it the past year, though they were increasingly using sunscreen, seeking shade and wearing protective clothing. The other study by the National Cancer Institute found 32 percent of those 18 to 21 were going to indoor tanning salons and 30 percent of those 22 to 25 were.
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