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NEWS
June 17, 2011
Janet Gilbert's column "The college we visited was mighty nice … and mighty white" (June 16) is a good example of racism. The student population was judged on skin color alone. Ms. Gilbert has taught her child to see only color. The wonderful diversity of cultures such as Greek, Italian, Hungarian, English, Canadian, French, Irish, Scottish, Norwegian, Polish, Czech, Swedish and Finnish — plus the many combinations thereof — were completely ignored. Hopefully, her children will be wise enough to see beyond skin color.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State health officials reported Thursday they have confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in Maryland for the year. The infected adult lives in the suburbs of Washington. The virus has also been detected in a Washington-area horse, and in special mosquito traps placed in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the human case was not unexpected - there were 16 reported cases last year. But they reminded people to take precautions by avoiding areas where mosquitoes are prevalent, covering their skin with clothes and hats, using insect repellent, and if possible, avoiding outdoor activities during mosquitoes' most active times at dusk and dawn.
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NEWS
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Summertime is skin time. And whether you plan to bare a little or a lot this season, it simply won't do to hit the beach and barbecues with parched, ashy, reddened or rough skin. And those aren't the only problems caused by winter's chill. Dr. Robert Weiss, a board-certified dermatologist and director of the Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein Institute in Hunt Valley, explains that post-winter skin can have less baseline pigment, making it more sensitive to summer's rays. "We've had so little sun exposure," he said.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
I am slowly losing faith in this nation, my nation, in its seeming inability to put race-related issues in our past. From a racial perspective, it sometimes feels like we are still on a slippery slope. That is simply unconscionable. People still fight wars over the pigment of one's skin, for being "different, not one of us. " Sadly, the pigmentation of one's skin is still a hurdle many Americans cannot seem to surmount. I believe Martin Luther King Jr. would be ashamed of where we are in the year 2014.
EXPLORE
By Pete Pichaske | April 16, 2013
To Funlayo Alabi, Shea Radiance is much more than a business. It's a mission. Started in their Ellicott City home by Funlayo and her husband, Shola, Shea Radiance sells skin and hair products made from shea butter. Since the company's beginning eight years ago, business has doubled every year, and Shea Radiance products are now sold in hundreds of outlets, including some Target and Whole Foods stores. What makes the Columbia-based business more than a moneymaking venture, however, is that raw shea butter -- like Funlayo and Shola Alabi -- comes from West Africa, extracted from the nut of the African shea tree.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
We know spring is right around the corner, but our skin is still taking a beating from the dry heat indoors and the brisk winds and temperatures that linger. To help skin return to a hydrated, moisturized, glowing state, consider one of these treatments from local spas. Or try them all. Your skin will thank you. A discreet indulgence : Triple Rose Hydrating Body Treatment Red Door Spa, Cross Keys The Village of Cross Keys; 42 Village Square, Baltimore 410-323-3636; reddoorspas.com Details: 50 minutes, $125 This two-part treatment, which uses the spa's Renew skin care line, is aimed at getting your skin super silky and soft by using the power of rose oil. The products have a faint rose scent, and this is considered an aromatherapy treatment, too. And how sweet it is. The process starts with a relaxing exfoliation.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 13, 2012
It's going to get cold again this weekend and the perfect time to winterize your skin. Frigid temperatures, dry hair, high home heat and winter sun can wreak havoc on your skin. If you don't fend off the damage you'll be looking at botox by the time your 30. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) suggest that at least 81 million Americans experience dry, itchy or scaly skin during the winter months. Johns Hopkins professor Dr. Rebecca A. Kazin has tips to keeping skin healthy.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
IT SOUNDS logical that patients with health insurance would be less likely to seek unnecessary tests and treatment if they had to bear some of the cost - had "some skin in the game," as Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee put it the other day. In fact, co-pays and deductibles work well in employer-sponsored plans for middle-income workers to discourage overuse of specialists and frequent trips to the doctor's office. Erecting such barriers in Medicaid, though, as the National Governors Association recommends, would likely cost more than it would save.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 12, 2009
Sammy Sosa said he's using a "bleaching cream" to soften his skin and is not trying to change his pigmentation. "I'm not a racist," the former Orioles outfielder told ESPN Deportes. Sosa, in his first public remarks since the famous photos became public, said he's not trying to look like Michael Jackson . "What happened was that I had been using the cream for a long time and that, combined with the bright TV lights, made my face look whiter than it really is. I don't think I look like Michael Jackson," he said to ESPN Deportes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
The first words the audience hears in "Yellowman" are a vivid evocation of what it's like to toil in summer under the South Carolina sun. The sun, we are told, can make you see things that aren't there. The sun is something you hear. And that's ironic, because the performance space in the spare and poetic production running at Rep Stage in Columbia seems perpetually cast in shadow. But as theater-goers' eyes struggle to pierce the subtly modulated layers of gray, we end up seeing with more clarity than we did before.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | June 19, 2014
When friends ask Jakki Wienecke to suggest a body lotion to relieve dry skin, the owner of Divine Creations Aromatherapy tells them to raid their kitchen pantry instead of going to the drugstore. Peel the rind of a lemon and soak the pieces in olive oil and slather it on your body, says Wienecke, the former owner of Body Logic Wellness Spa in Bel Air. The lemon contains antioxidants while the olive oil boosts your immune system, says the Bel Air resident. “All lotions begin with oil and they add water to it,” Wienecke says.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Summertime is skin time. And whether you plan to bare a little or a lot this season, it simply won't do to hit the beach and barbecues with parched, ashy, reddened or rough skin. And those aren't the only problems caused by winter's chill. Dr. Robert Weiss, a board-certified dermatologist and director of the Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein Institute in Hunt Valley, explains that post-winter skin can have less baseline pigment, making it more sensitive to summer's rays. "We've had so little sun exposure," he said.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Protesting campus graduation speakers that some students or faculty reject, often on specious grounds, denigrates having distinguished scholars share their ideas with graduating students ( "Commencement speakers fair game for protest," June 1). As Stevenson University philosopher A. Hooke correctly points out, in recent years a spate of thin but angry objections has resulted in more and more distinguished individuals being dis-invited from commencement ceremonies. Critics claim that students can't "talk back" at commencement speeches and hence might be forced to hear things they reject.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
It all started in the kitchen. That's where Jamyla Bennu first mixed up batches of hair and skin products to give to friends and relatives more than 13 years ago. Since then, Bennu has refined her creations of organic shea butter and aloe vera juice, coconut oil and honey. She and her husband, writer and filmmaker Pierre Bennu, have slowly built their company, Oyin Handmade, from the ground up, building connections on social media and wooing a loyal customer base through online sales.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
The Senate Intelligence Committee voted today to declassify portions of its report on the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" to extract information from terrorist detainees, but portions of the work that have been leaked appear to confirm Americans' worst fears about the secret program. Committee investigators found that the brutal treatment of prisoners was far more widespread than the agency has admitted and that CIA officials deliberately misled Congress about the effectiveness of methods that brought shame on the nation and amounted to little more than torture by another name.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
Thanks for your recent editorial supporting a ban on indoor tanning by minors ("Ban the booth," Jan. 20). As a melanoma survivor, I know the pain and uncertainty of going through treatment for that illness. My melanoma was probably caused by years of being in the outdoors as a kid before sunscreen was even invented. I am grateful for the treatment I received at Johns Hopkins Hospital that saved my life, and I now volunteer for the American Cancer Society to help others fight cancer.
FEATURES
April 29, 1997
In an effort to catch skin cancers while they can still be cured, local hospitals will offer free screenings throughout May where dermatologists will advise people whether to seek additional care for skin blemishes, moles and discolorations.Melanoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancer -- killing 7,300 people each year in the United States -- yet most Americans don't know its warning signs. Free screenings are being offered across the country in a campaign organized by the American Academy of Dermatology.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | March 9, 1993
First, they take a scalpel and scrape the top layer of skin from your face. Then, they spread acid where they just finished scraping.Some kind of torture, you ask, aimed at getting prisoners to talk?Not even close. It's a skin care treatment designed to remove acne or other facial scars, tighten wrinkles and heal skin damage caused by over-exposure to the sun.Not only do women freely submit to this treatment, called BioMedic MicroPeel, they shell out $75 at a time for the pleasure. And they say it doesn't hurt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Back from Tribal Council, Vytas is perfectly grateful and softspoken about being kept, and the women are eating it right up. He doesn't mean it, but he's playing this perfectly. As long as he doesn't turn into a jerk later, I would be perfectly alright with him winning. They talk about their alliance of five, and Tina makes the mistake of letting Monica know that she's No. 5. Monica admits that it's going to be hard not to accept an offer better than fifth when the tribes merge, and she should.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
The dire effects of the government shutdown reach far beyond the hundreds of thousands of furloughed government workers -- along with all the stores, restaurants and other businesses that rely on them as customers. The shutdown is damaging America's foreign policy in ways that may not be recoverable. The effects are not as immediately apparent today as, say, the closure of the Lincoln Memorial or the Head Start program hiatus. But how is the U.S. going to remain an important player in the world as foreigners observe that we can't even manage our own country?
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