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NEWS
January 1, 2010
Kudos to Douglas J. Kaplan, in his recent letter to The Sun, "City needs ethics, not just competence" (Dec. 29). I totally agree with Mr. Kaplan that it is more important to have a mayor who provides good moral and ethical leadership and who can be a role model for all of us than it is to have someone with good administrative skills. Stealing is morally wrong, whether it is a gift card or millions. Baltimore City cannot afford to have leaders in the executive or legislative branch who do not understand that basic principle of leadership.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
David Chirinos, a former Marine Corps corporal who served in Afghanistan, died of complications from cancer and liver failure Sept. 13 at his Parkville home. He was 27. Born in Miami, he was the son of Rosa Chirinos. He was a graduate of South Ridge High School, where he played varsity volleyball and was team captain. He worked for DirecTV and for a hotel car valet service for a year before enlisting in the Marines in 2009. "He took his volleyball seriously and could jump super high," said a high school classmate, Chris Montero, who lives in Wilmington, N.C. "He was a natural leader, in a spontaneous kind of way. He was never pushy.
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SPORTS
By Matt Slovin, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
It should come as no surprise to anyone that Ray Lewis works as a motivational speaker in his free time. The Ravens' fearless leader has been seen many times barking last-minute instructions and words of wisdom at his teammates before they take the field. And this week, Lewis is in London “for a three-day minicamp with the London Warriors of the BAFA National Leagues,” according to a report by CBSsports.com. The Warriors brought in Lewis to hype them up in anticipation of their upcoming game against their crosstown rivals, the London Blitz.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
No parent wants to be in a position to use it, but child-safety experts agree that learning infant and child CPR is a must for every mother and father. "It's one skill that just doesn't come naturally to caregivers. It's a learned technique," says Lanny Dowell, Greater Baltimore Medical Center's parent education and doula coordinator. Courses are offered by many local hospitals and through the American Red Cross. First aid for choking is also taught in CPR classes. And some are combined with training on using defibrillators or with adult CPR. While parents can watch a video for instruction, it's helpful to practice on a mannequin, experts say. "Most people learn by doing," says Sarah Sherman, training center coordinator for the American Heart Association at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
When the plant where Sabina D'Antonio worked inspecting fiber-optic components suddenly shut down last year, she figured she had enough skills to find another job despite the recession. But finding more work has proved difficult — and the recession hasn't been her only hindrance. "I do not have any college education, which is killing me now," said D'Antonio, who was employed at a solar energy plant before working for Infinera Corp. in Annapolis Junction. Despite "what I have been doing for years, I now have to have a degree to prove myself."
BUSINESS
October 19, 1990
When asked by The Evening Sun whether they think young people starting their first jobs are well prepared or poorly trained, most callers to SUNDIAL said they believed workers had fewer skills.Of 231 callers, 139 said they believe high school graduates have fewer basic skills than in years past. Forty-six callers said they believe new workers are better prepared, and 46 said they believe the skill level is about the same.When asked about college students entering the work force, 100 said they have fewer skills, 71 said they are better prepared, and 58 said about the same.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Entering the summer, Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon knew he had two pretty good options regarding Jake Layman's immediate future. Either the promising, 6-foot-8 forward would join the Terps for summer workouts, allowing him to bond with future teammates. Or else the incoming freshman would make the USA Men's Under-18 Team, potentially gaining valuable experience playing against international opponents. The latter scenario unfolded, giving Maryland bragging rights to a player who is using the 2012 FIBA Americas U18 Championship to showcase his varied skills.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
Lake Clifton boys basketball coach Herman "Tree" Harried will conduct his annual Skills for Life Basketball Camp on July 25-27 at Lake Clifton. The camp, for boys and girls ages 8-12, will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on each of the three days. The cost of the camp is $75 and you can register on the first day or contact Joyce Venable at 443-415-8125 .
EXPLORE
March 23, 2013
I was happy to see that Bond Mill Elementary has advanced to the state finals of DestinationImagination, according to Sarah Toth's article in your edition of March 21.  Bond Mill was a worthy competitor when our kids were in Odyssey of the Mind (OM), a similar program, and I see that that school is still at it. Our family was heavily involved in OM for a dozen years in the '80s and '90s.  For months each year our house was littered with art materials, tools and balsa wood.  Our teams were fortunate to get to the World Competition three times, representing Glenarden Woods Elementary, Kenmoore Middle and Eleanor Roosevelt High.
NEWS
By NANINE HARTZENBUSCH and NANINE HARTZENBUSCH,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 21, 2005
The Anne Arundel Department of Public Works held a skills competition and fleet inspection at Sandy Point State Park on Tuesday. Above, the southern district team - Mark Taylor (left) of Annapolis, Derrick Gross of Shadyside, Chris Richardson of Annapolis, William Hunter of Glen Burnie, Mike Branson of Dunkirk and Henry Porter of Pasadena - participates in the truck pull contest. At right, Brian Galloway of the northern district competes in the chainsaw competition.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The flowering branches of Mulan magnolia that grace the cover of Joan Lok's new book on Chinese brush painting appear more brightly colored than in her original work, probably to catch the eye of someone browsing in a bookstore, guesses the author. The Columbia resident says she is pleased with the quality of paper used for the book and the way the reproductions of her original flower paintings neatly fit with the detailed instructions on the soft-cover book's 128 pages. And the longtime federal employee is also happy her first how-to book will be available at bookshops and at a local chain of craft stores, tapping into a marketing niche.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Maryland freshman Dion Wiley's summer began the day he reported to school in early June for classes, official team workouts and pickup games. When his new Terps teammates went home for a couple of weeks in mid-August, Wiley's basketball education continued in Europe. In what was the first trip out of the country for the 18-year-old from Prince George's County, Wiley was part of a regional all-star team of college players that spent more than a week in England, Germany, Belgium and The Netherlands.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
My oh my, schools have cut out handwriting. What do they think they are doing? How are children going to sign their name? Technology has brought many changes to our lives, but it doesn't mean we can dismiss handwriting, a basic skill. Especially in business, we must sign our names while we open a checking or savings account, sign for a loan or mortgage and any receipt must be signed when using a credit card - the preferred choice of payment for today. A waitress comes to your table and writes your order with a pen and paper, and then goes to the computer to put the order into the kitchen.
NEWS
By H.N. Burdett | August 21, 2014
In 1970, American blood was being shed on the killing fields of Vietnam. Congress lowered the voting age from 21 to 18. Richard Nixon's Oval Office conversations were being recorded. And in Annapolis, a cub reporter was hired by the Evening Capital. He was nearly 30 years old, borderline ancient for a beginning daily newspaper reporter. Unlike other Capital staffers, he was a Naval Academy graduate with a master's degree in journalism, and he was a Vietnam war combat veteran. And he could not type.
NEWS
By Robert P. Giloth and Maureen Conway | August 14, 2014
Last month's enactment of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), so long in the making, is a milestone. It makes important updates to our workforce training system and demonstrates national support for the expanded use of sector strategies that forge training partnerships between employers, nonprofits, foundations and public agencies. But WIOA is still just a first step in addressing the problem of connecting people to jobs. We need to build on it to establish a true and equitable apprenticeship system in the United States.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 13, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -  Jacquille Veii used his speed and quickness to get open out of the slot, made a sliding catch across the middle during team drills and later made a 25-yard reception during the two-minute portion of practice. The Maryland sophomore was in only his first day as a slot receiver after being moved from running back Monday, but he flashed some skills at his new position during practice Tuesday night. “Yeah. I saw that,” Terps senior linebacker L.A. Goree said.
TRAVEL
By Ryan Kneller, Tribune Newspapers and By Ryan Kneller, Tribune Newspapers | August 7, 2014
It's 9 a.m. on a recent Saturday and I am one of 20 day campers sitting around a fire pit in rural central New Jersey. Doused in suntan lotion and bug spray, we are all there for the same reason: to learn survival skills, particularly those meant to fend off cannibalistic corpses. Yes, you read that correctly - cannibalistic corpses, more commonly known as zombies. From TV favorite "The Walking Dead" to last year's blockbuster "World War Z," the flesh-eating foes are everywhere.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Standing at his locker Monday night after a practice spent chasing down running backs and quarterbacks, Courtney Upshaw brooded about a few plays that had eluded him. Visibly tired, Upshaw shook his head. “I've got to do better,” he said. “We all know I've got to improve. Every year, I want to get better. That's what it's all about.” Quiet and introspective, Upshaw is keenly aware of his NFL reputation - but looking to burnish it. The Ravens' burly strong-side linebacker is known as a stout run stopper whose toughness keeps running backs from scampering outside for first downs.
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