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By Sarah Kickler Kelber | March 15, 2013
Making cookies with little kids always seems like a good idea until clean-up time. That's where the skillet cookie comes in. You don't get any bowls dirty because you mix all the ingredients directly into a cast-iron pan.  I originally saw this on Sophistimom.com, who recommends using high-quality ingredients because: "That would lessen the flavor, lessen the experience, and still make you fat. " Ha! And point taken. We had a bar of lemon-pepper dark chocolate and the last of a bottle of Madagascar vanilla -- and no regrets with the result.
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber | March 15, 2013
Making cookies with little kids always seems like a good idea until clean-up time. That's where the skillet cookie comes in. You don't get any bowls dirty because you mix all the ingredients directly into a cast-iron pan.  I originally saw this on Sophistimom.com, who recommends using high-quality ingredients because: "That would lessen the flavor, lessen the experience, and still make you fat. " Ha! And point taken. We had a bar of lemon-pepper dark chocolate and the last of a bottle of Madagascar vanilla -- and no regrets with the result.
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
My friend posted a link to this recipe for a skillet cookie the other day, and I could not stop thinking about it. I'd never even heard of such a thing, but today I just had to try it. The blog Sophistimom posted this originally, and I love the post. She recommends using high-quality ingredients because: "You wouldn't want to use crappy flour, or crappy margarine or fake vanilla. That would lessen the flavor, lessen the experience, and still make you fat. " Ha! And point taken.
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
This potato salad recipe bucks the usual drenched-in-mayo stereotype — and that's a good thing. It's vegan (and gluten-free), but don't let that steer you away. You can't beat the flavor, thanks to a dressing with a base of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, red onion, herbs and more. My husband's cousin Coco, who blogs at http://www.operagirlcooks.com , developed the recipe to be served warm, which is outstanding. But the few times we've had leftovers, we've enjoyed it chilled, too. The flavors intensify as it sits, so if you make it ahead for a tailgate party or other event and chill it overnight, it's just as good.
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By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | October 2, 1994
The problem: It's dinner time. Maybe not right this minute, but soon. It happens every night. But so do a lot of other things, all of which conspire to keep cooks out of kitchens. The simplicity of the skillet can pull them back in.A skillet, frying pan, saute pan, whatever the trusty vessel happens to be called, can be a cook's secret weapon for getting dinner on the table in a hurry. No other piece of equipment, not even the microwave oven, offers so many self-contained mealtime solutions.
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By Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 20, 2001
Try this method of preparing yellow squash: Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a large nonstick skillet. Thinly slice the squash and make a single layer in the skillet. Sprinkle with seasoned salt or creole seasoning and freshly ground black pepper. Let the squash brown on one side. Then turn the slices and repeat the process. You want both sides to be golden-brown.
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By Kate Shatzkin | October 11, 2006
KITCHEN TIP Create a makeshift panini press by heating a sandwich in a large, heavy skillet over moderately high heat and placing a smaller skillet or saucepan (with a clean bottom) on top. Weigh the top skillet down with a large can of soup or beans. Cook sandwiches until golden on the bottom, 3 to 4 minutes, then repeat on the other side. From "Stonewall Kitchen Favorites," by Jonathan King, Jim Stott and Kathy Gunst innrecipes.com Fall is the time for getting away to a rustic country inn for leaf-peeping, afternoon tea and fantastic breakfasts.
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By ROB KASPER | July 30, 1995
I crave fried chicken. In summer the best kind of fried chicken is cold fried chicken, the kind pulled from a picnic basket. In hot months this kind of fried chicken is more appealing than the kind that you eat right after it is pulled from a sizzling skillet.The skillet, of course, is a key to success. It should be big, dark and storied. The best fried-chicken skillet is one that has a tale that goes with it. Such a skillet might be described as "that old skillet, the one Grandma used to threaten us with."
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
This potato salad recipe bucks the usual drenched-in-mayo stereotype — and that's a good thing. It's vegan (and gluten-free), but don't let that steer you away. You can't beat the flavor, thanks to a dressing with a base of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, red onion, herbs and more. My husband's cousin Coco, who blogs at http://www.operagirlcooks.com , developed the recipe to be served warm, which is outstanding. But the few times we've had leftovers, we've enjoyed it chilled, too. The flavors intensify as it sits, so if you make it ahead for a tailgate party or other event and chill it overnight, it's just as good.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 1, 2006
It was getting to be time to say goodbye to the garden, a parting that I have always found difficult. I have a tendency to cling to the belief that the tomato plants aren't dead yet, that the peppers will rebound and that the basil will bounce back from its frosty dance with death. As the temperatures drop, so do my standards. Tomatoes and bell peppers that would have been heaved into the compost pile in August are given special treatment in October, carried into the dark basement and gingerly placed on a bed of newspapers to ripen.
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
My friend posted a link to this recipe for a skillet cookie the other day, and I could not stop thinking about it. I'd never even heard of such a thing, but today I just had to try it. The blog Sophistimom posted this originally, and I love the post. She recommends using high-quality ingredients because: "You wouldn't want to use crappy flour, or crappy margarine or fake vanilla. That would lessen the flavor, lessen the experience, and still make you fat. " Ha! And point taken.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | November 15, 2006
The idea of a skillet supper is hardly revolutionary. A staple in many American kitchens since General Mills introduced Hamburger Helper in the 1970s, the classic casserole was a precursor to today's popular and convenient "meal kits." The problem with a meal in a box? From a health standpoint, the veggies are dehydrated specks and the seasoning mixes tend to be high in sodium. This One-Skillet Italian Meal takes a worthy concept and freshens it up: Add sliced mushrooms, green pepper (buy chopped in the freezer case)
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By ROB KASPER | November 1, 2006
It was getting to be time to say goodbye to the garden, a parting that I have always found difficult. I have a tendency to cling to the belief that the tomato plants aren't dead yet, that the peppers will rebound and that the basil will bounce back from its frosty dance with death. As the temperatures drop, so do my standards. Tomatoes and bell peppers that would have been heaved into the compost pile in August are given special treatment in October, carried into the dark basement and gingerly placed on a bed of newspapers to ripen.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | October 11, 2006
KITCHEN TIP Create a makeshift panini press by heating a sandwich in a large, heavy skillet over moderately high heat and placing a smaller skillet or saucepan (with a clean bottom) on top. Weigh the top skillet down with a large can of soup or beans. Cook sandwiches until golden on the bottom, 3 to 4 minutes, then repeat on the other side. From "Stonewall Kitchen Favorites," by Jonathan King, Jim Stott and Kathy Gunst innrecipes.com Fall is the time for getting away to a rustic country inn for leaf-peeping, afternoon tea and fantastic breakfasts.
NEWS
February 8, 2006
Serves 6 1 pound sweet cherries (about 3 cups), pitted grated zest of 1/2 lemon, organic if available 1/4 cup sugar (divided use) 1/2 cup (4 ounces) all-purpose flour, pastry flour or whole-wheat pastry flour, plus 1 tablespoon for the skillet pinch of salt 4 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature (divided use) 3 eggs 2 cups warm milk (divided use) 2 tablespoons Armagnac or cognac 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract confectioners' sugar Early in the day, rinse and dry the cherries.
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By DONNA DEANE AND JUDY YAO and DONNA DEANE AND JUDY YAO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2005
You can flirt with a silly pepper grinder or have a brief fling with an amusing but impractical cake pan, but a cook's relationship with a 12-inch skillet is no casual affair - it's a long-term commitment. This pan is your significant other in the kitchen. Day in, day out, it sears, sautes and deglazes for you. It stays with you step by step, from browning to braising, as you work on a multistep recipe. If it's not a great match, you notice every time you cook that it's too heavy or a pain to clean.
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By Rob Kasper | January 29, 1997
There was just me, my spouse and the oysters. It turned out to be a delicious Saturday night.The oysters, plump mollusks, came from Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood in Baltimore's Cross Street Market. The oyster knife, to pry them open, came from neighbors. How embarrassing to be caught at home on a Saturday night with no oyster knife.The recipe for this dish, skillet oysters, came from Emeril Lagasse's recent cookbook "Louisiana Real & Rustic," (Morrow, 1996, $25). Folks who live around Chesapeake Bay are usually wary of taking any advice from an "outsider" on how to cook oysters.
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By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 28, 1996
The hinge on the silver coffeepot's been broken for years, and the belly's black with tarnish. The beloved old Mixmaster's useless without beaters. And what good is a great chef's knife so dull it won't cut Jell-O?Candidates for a garage sale, one and all?Not unless you want someone else to reap the benefits of your ignorance.We've all got trouble spots like these in our kitchens, china cabinets and silver chests. But with a little TLC and phone shopping, you can enjoy years more service from kitchenwares for a fraction of the cost of new, and restore serving pieces and dinnerware to past glory.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
Veal is an expensive choice for a weeknight dinner, but if you are celebrating a special occasion, it is worth it for its mild, versatile flavor. We've cooked the chops in a skillet to make better use of the delicious pan drippings. We've added a touch of the spice mixture known as herbes de Provence (rosemary, sage, thyme and lavender, available premixed in the spice aisle) and a warm bell-pepper slaw. Serve the veal chops with a spicy Rhone red wine, and for dessert buy those tiny French cakes known as madeleines at a bakery.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2004
The cicadas are here. While some folks are reaching for protective netting and headgear, tennis rackets and fly swatters, others are readying the saute pan and skillet. "Cicadas are the truffles of the insect world," says Gaye Williams, an entomologist with the Maryland Department of Agriculture in Annapolis. "They're just like any other food commodity, but they're scarce." Indeed, if you miss tasting them this year, you'll have to wait for 2021 for another chance. "If people really want a food experience, this is the year to do it because of the huge numbers of cicadas," Williams said.
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