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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011
"The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work" is a potent grass-roots documentary — and it's all the stronger because its leaves of grass poke up through the asphalt. Writer-director-editor Richard Yeagley salutes the virtuoso craft, practical intelligence and fraternal cheer of Maryland's honest tradesmen without prettifying their hard work or playing down the costs it exacts on bodies and souls. He weaves vignettes of (mostly) men on the job into a lament for the growing sociopolitical bias against blue-collar workers.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
The Baltimore-area job market is largely split between high-skill, higher-pay work and low-skill, low-paying positions, but opportunities exist to help workers without a college education navigate to jobs in the middle that pay the bills, a new study suggests. The report, to be released Wednesday by the Opportunity Collaborative, recommends six fields that "offer the greatest promise for low skilled workers to move into family-supporting, mid-skilled jobs": health care, construction, information technology, transportation and warehousing, business services and manufacturing.
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1990
Athough the nation's employers spend about $30 billion a year on training, entry-level workers and those without a college degree often are not given the opportunity to participate in employer-based training programs."
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The Maryland General Assembly on Tuesday approved a new program that would distribute $2.5 million in state grants each year to train workers for high-demand industries. The House of Delegates voted 115-23 to approve the measure, which passed the Senate unanimously last month. Gov. Martin O'Malley introduced the Maryland Employment Advancement Right Now bill, given the acronym EARN, and on Tuesday celebrated its passage.  "Though Maryland has built up one of the most highly-skilled workforces in the nation, too many of our workers lack the skills they need to compete for the jobs in highest demand," O'Malley said in a statement, adding that "The EARN initiative will help us bridge that skills gap. "  Under the program, grants would be distributed through partnerships among workforce centers, community colleges, employers and others in "targeted industries" that have a high demand for skilled workers.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The Maryland General Assembly on Tuesday approved a new program that would distribute $2.5 million in state grants each year to train workers for high-demand industries. The House of Delegates voted 115-23 to approve the measure, which passed the Senate unanimously last month. Gov. Martin O'Malley introduced the Maryland Employment Advancement Right Now bill, given the acronym EARN, and on Tuesday celebrated its passage.  "Though Maryland has built up one of the most highly-skilled workforces in the nation, too many of our workers lack the skills they need to compete for the jobs in highest demand," O'Malley said in a statement, adding that "The EARN initiative will help us bridge that skills gap. "  Under the program, grants would be distributed through partnerships among workforce centers, community colleges, employers and others in "targeted industries" that have a high demand for skilled workers.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Your recent commentary on information technology is yet another slant on the increased need for education to work our way out of the current economic recession ("Tech to the rescue," Aug. 27). I will go along with an increased need for IT personnel, even if IT seems to cover a multitude of job descriptions of varying skill levels. According to this your article, only 30 percent to 45 percent of high school graduates are ready to take college level math and science courses, yet that might be enough to supply all the graduates the country needs.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
Maryland industry needs skilled workersSean Somerville's article on job shortages in manufacturing (July 13) accurately portrays a serious problem facing Maryland manufacturers.A quick look at the classified section of The Sunday Sun shows the demand for a wide variety of skilled workers in manufacturing. Filling jobs in manufacturing is an issue that goes to the heart of the health of Maryland's economy.It is also a litmus test of elected officials who claim to support ''economic development.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 23, 2005
Few things light up an economy like pouring foundations and nailing shingles. They employ skilled workers in your town, not overseas. They add to the community's capital stock and tax base. They generate revenue for lumber, drywall and carpet vendors. And the permanent growth that they represent - new resident families needing sofas, dish soap and leaf bags - supercharges the larger commercial climate. So the stalling of Maryland's construction-job growth this summer and fall is something to be concerned about.
BUSINESS
By David Novich | March 8, 1998
MICHIGAN SEN. Spencer Abraham proposed last week a sharp increase in the number of visas issued to highly skilled workers to help fill the shortage of computer analysts and programmers in the country.Now, there are available roughly 65,000 H-1B visas, which allow highly skilled workers to remain in the United States for up to six years. They are expected to run out by May.Under Abraham's plan, an additional 25,000 of the highly sought visas would be issued.But critics suggest that computer firms might use the introduction of foreign recruits to hold down salaries.
NEWS
By Len Shindel | April 19, 1993
NEGOTIATIONS on a new contract in the steel industry are without doubt the most crucial in history because both management and the international leadership of the United Steelworkers of America are seeking a revolution in the way labor is organized at steel plants.Leadership of the union has announced that it will seek long-term contracts providing for "new work systems," along with guarantees of no layoffs and no concessions. It also wants workers to be "involved in decision-making at all levels of the enterprise."
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The General Assembly has approved the governor's plan to distribute $2.5 million in state grants each year to train workers for high-demand industries. The House of Delegates voted 115-23 Tuesday to approve the program, the first piece of Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2013 legislative agenda to be sent to him for his signature. The Employment Advancement Right Now program, called EARN, passed the Senate unanimously last month. "Though Maryland has built up one of the most highly skilled workforces in the nation, too many of our workers lack the skills they need to compete for the jobs in highest demand," O'Malley said in a statement.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Your recent commentary on information technology is yet another slant on the increased need for education to work our way out of the current economic recession ("Tech to the rescue," Aug. 27). I will go along with an increased need for IT personnel, even if IT seems to cover a multitude of job descriptions of varying skill levels. According to this your article, only 30 percent to 45 percent of high school graduates are ready to take college level math and science courses, yet that might be enough to supply all the graduates the country needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011
"The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work" is a potent grass-roots documentary — and it's all the stronger because its leaves of grass poke up through the asphalt. Writer-director-editor Richard Yeagley salutes the virtuoso craft, practical intelligence and fraternal cheer of Maryland's honest tradesmen without prettifying their hard work or playing down the costs it exacts on bodies and souls. He weaves vignettes of (mostly) men on the job into a lament for the growing sociopolitical bias against blue-collar workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Richard Yeagley fueled his punchy new film, "The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work," with a fierce hometown nostalgia. This first-time documentary maker grew up near Loch Raven High School — he's a 2002 graduate — and went to Stevenson University when it was still called Villa Julie College. Film degree in hand, he took off for Los Angeles, where he found ready employment; during one stint at Toyota, he helped craft the multi-DVD history of the car manufacturer's first half-century in America.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
When the plant where Sabina D'Antonio worked inspecting fiber-optic components suddenly shut down last year, she figured she had enough skills to find another job despite the recession. But finding more work has proved difficult — and the recession hasn't been her only hindrance. "I do not have any college education, which is killing me now," said D'Antonio, who was employed at a solar energy plant before working for Infinera Corp. in Annapolis Junction. Despite "what I have been doing for years, I now have to have a degree to prove myself."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
Maryland is expected to face shortages of workers to fill jobs requiring more than a high school diploma but less than a college degree - jobs that will make up the biggest share of openings over the next several years, according to a national study to be released today. The state has a widening gap between work force credentials and the so-called "middle skills" needed for jobs that will account for 42 percent of all openings by 2016, reported the Washington-based National Skills Coalition, a worker training advocacy group.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
The shortage of skilled workers in the manufacturing industry means David R. Gischel has two options. He can either accept printing jobs he's not sure his company can handle, or refuse the business. "We turn away jobs, then they might not come back," said Gischel, vice president and co-founder of Victor Graphics Inc. in Southwest Baltimore, which prints material for colleges and universities and is looking to add three or four more workers. "It affects our relationships with our customers."
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The General Assembly has approved the governor's plan to distribute $2.5 million in state grants each year to train workers for high-demand industries. The House of Delegates voted 115-23 Tuesday to approve the program, the first piece of Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2013 legislative agenda to be sent to him for his signature. The Employment Advancement Right Now program, called EARN, passed the Senate unanimously last month. "Though Maryland has built up one of the most highly skilled workforces in the nation, too many of our workers lack the skills they need to compete for the jobs in highest demand," O'Malley said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | April 4, 2007
We've been hearing a lot about a talent shortage in the labor market. But where exactly is the shortage in talent? Because, seriously, it's hard to avoid layoff news coming from all corners of the work force these days. Case in point: Circuit City fired 7 percent of its hourly workers last week. It plans to replace them with lower-paid employees. But recruiters and employment experts say job candidates increasingly have the upper hand in the job market as employers compete for talent.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 23, 2005
Few things light up an economy like pouring foundations and nailing shingles. They employ skilled workers in your town, not overseas. They add to the community's capital stock and tax base. They generate revenue for lumber, drywall and carpet vendors. And the permanent growth that they represent - new resident families needing sofas, dish soap and leaf bags - supercharges the larger commercial climate. So the stalling of Maryland's construction-job growth this summer and fall is something to be concerned about.
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