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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 28, 1991
SLAVE TO THE GRINDSkid Row (Atlantic 82242)As non-fans see it, heavy metal bands might have something to say, but who can tell with all that noise? That's why Skid Row's "Slave to the Grind" will end up preaching only to the converted, and it's a shame, because beneath the blaring guitars and screeching vocals, this band talks a lot of sense. Sure, there's a certain amount of girl-crazed bluster (as in "Get the F--- Out"), but there's also a surprising amount of good advice, from the don't-waste-your-life message of the title tune to the show-some-respect sentiments of "Mudkicker."
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Infinity Theatre Company continues its first full summer season with "Little Shop of Horrors," a 1982 dark musical comedy with book and lyrics by Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken. With this terrific production, Infinity fulfills its promise to bring New York professionals to the Annapolis theater scene. The opening notes by the five-piece, onstage live rock band signaled the exciting start of this Broadway-caliber show at Children's Theatre in Annapolis. Every role is perfectly cast from top to bottom, beginning with those sassy Skid Row street urchins, Crystal, Ronnette and Chiffon — played by Ariana Scoggins, Ardale Shepherd and Martina Sykes — who serve as a grooving Greek chorus.
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NEWS
April 12, 1993
As the jury in the Rodney King beating case continued its deliberations yesterday, Angelenos prayed in an amphitheater by the Hollywood Freeway. They prayed in a Roman Catholic Cathedral near Skid Row. And they prayed in churches in the neighborhoods hit hardest by last year's riots.Today, hundreds of National Guardsmen are scheduled to go on standby around the city. But many residents say they are sure that, whatever the verdict, there will be no violence."If we can help it -- the community and church groups -- there won't be anything," said a worshiper at one service.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS | November 26, 2007
LOW FIVE Yesterday's loss was the Ravens' fifth straight, marking the longest losing streak in club history. They now play back-to-back games against the New England Patriots and Indianapolis Colts, so it seems likely that the Ravens will be riding a seven-game losing streak heading to Miami on Dec. 16. Bet the winless Dolphins have that one circled on the calendar. A BUMPY RIDE Patriots @Ravens Next Monday, 8:30 p.m., ESPN, Ch. 13, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Off the board
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 11, 1992
If you spend a lot of time listening to hard rock, either on the radio or in the concert hall, odds are that you think of Skid Row primarily as a party band. Sure, the band had some success with slow songs like "18 and Life" or "I Remember You," but as anyone who has ever caught their stage show knows, mostly what they do is make a lot of noise and have a lot of fun -- pretty much what you'd expect from a band specializing in songs like "Monkey Business."So if you heard that Skid Row was in town to play a benefit for the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, you might think the story was somebody's idea of a joke.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Infinity Theatre Company continues its first full summer season with "Little Shop of Horrors," a 1982 dark musical comedy with book and lyrics by Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken. With this terrific production, Infinity fulfills its promise to bring New York professionals to the Annapolis theater scene. The opening notes by the five-piece, onstage live rock band signaled the exciting start of this Broadway-caliber show at Children's Theatre in Annapolis. Every role is perfectly cast from top to bottom, beginning with those sassy Skid Row street urchins, Crystal, Ronnette and Chiffon — played by Ariana Scoggins, Ardale Shepherd and Martina Sykes — who serve as a grooving Greek chorus.
FEATURES
By Henry Alford and Henry Alford,Newsday | September 1, 1994
Chutzpah, moxie, spunk: It would be difficult to discuss Lynn Snowden and her highly engaging book, "Nine Lives," without invoking these three words. In fact, given the rigorous physical and emotional demands of the reporting that she did for this work of participatory journalism, it might be more appropriate to declaim: Chutzpah! Moxie! Spunk!A free-lance magazine writer who got herself hired for nine different jobs in the course of a year -- from counseling rape victims in Texas to making chocolate dinosaurs in a factory in Connecticut, from writing copy for a New York City advertising agency to working as a stripper on Bourbon Street in New Orleans -- Ms. Snowden has an ability to throw herself into harrowing situations that is marked by equal parts determination and brio.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Staff Writer | August 13, 1992
The camp musical, "Little Shop of Horrors," is getting to be as much of a cult classic as the low-budget 1960 Roger Corman movie thriller on which it is based.The show about a man-eating Venus' flytrap bent on universal conquest is making the rounds in the Baltimore-Metropolitan area. The work, with lyrics and book by the late Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken (creators of lyrics and music for "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast"), is running at the Burn Brae Dinner Theatre through Sept.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
The daily card game in the lobby of the Baltimore Hotel starts at 11 a.m., give or take, and goes through lunch to 2, 3, 4 p.m., or whenever the money runs out. The cast may change, the game may be pinochle or cutthroat gin rummy, but the rituals in this Los Angeles hotel remain constant. Bring your money, preferably in ones. Bring your cigarettes, if you smoke, and almost everyone in the Baltimore Hotel seems to smoke, except for the gentleman in the corner, the one on oxygen, and he looks a little wistful.
NEWS
July 9, 1991
A quiet transformation is taking place in Baltimore City's tavern industry -- and not for the better. Because of the continuing loss of the city's middle class and concerns about street crime, established neighborhood watering holes are being replaced by liquor stores which -- due to licensing requirements -- masquerade as taverns but make their money by selling liquor miniatures and cheap, fortified wines, often to vagrants.This socio-economic change is having a profound impact on the downtown and adjoining residential neighborhoods.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 6, 2002
SO BASEBALL realized a strike would be the most idiotic form of self-immolation and here we sit, one week later, happy that our daily dose of sporting theater has not been denied. Even here? Even here at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, where the local nine - or 31 on the expanded roster - recently relieved itself of a 10-game losing skid, only perhaps to have commenced a new one last night. All those Texas long balls. Ouch. It isn't fair, of course. Across the country, a gritty little "small-market" team in green and gold is launching an emphatic assault on baseball's record books.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
The daily card game in the lobby of the Baltimore Hotel starts at 11 a.m., give or take, and goes through lunch to 2, 3, 4 p.m., or whenever the money runs out. The cast may change, the game may be pinochle or cutthroat gin rummy, but the rituals in this Los Angeles hotel remain constant. Bring your money, preferably in ones. Bring your cigarettes, if you smoke, and almost everyone in the Baltimore Hotel seems to smoke, except for the gentleman in the corner, the one on oxygen, and he looks a little wistful.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- Begin at the green of Grant Park, where Lake Michigan shimmers, and drive about two miles west along Madison Street.Before you arrive at the United Center, where the Democrats will convene Monday, you drive past the gracious old commercial buildings in the Loop, past the shiny new towers near the Chicago River. You cover blocks that were leveled by the urban renewal programs of the '60s and by the fires that burned after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.Within sight of the center, you find some of Chicago's infamous public housing.
FEATURES
By Henry Alford and Henry Alford,Newsday | September 1, 1994
Chutzpah, moxie, spunk: It would be difficult to discuss Lynn Snowden and her highly engaging book, "Nine Lives," without invoking these three words. In fact, given the rigorous physical and emotional demands of the reporting that she did for this work of participatory journalism, it might be more appropriate to declaim: Chutzpah! Moxie! Spunk!A free-lance magazine writer who got herself hired for nine different jobs in the course of a year -- from counseling rape victims in Texas to making chocolate dinosaurs in a factory in Connecticut, from writing copy for a New York City advertising agency to working as a stripper on Bourbon Street in New Orleans -- Ms. Snowden has an ability to throw herself into harrowing situations that is marked by equal parts determination and brio.
NEWS
April 12, 1993
As the jury in the Rodney King beating case continued its deliberations yesterday, Angelenos prayed in an amphitheater by the Hollywood Freeway. They prayed in a Roman Catholic Cathedral near Skid Row. And they prayed in churches in the neighborhoods hit hardest by last year's riots.Today, hundreds of National Guardsmen are scheduled to go on standby around the city. But many residents say they are sure that, whatever the verdict, there will be no violence."If we can help it -- the community and church groups -- there won't be anything," said a worshiper at one service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 11, 1992
If you spend a lot of time listening to hard rock, either on the radio or in the concert hall, odds are that you think of Skid Row primarily as a party band. Sure, the band had some success with slow songs like "18 and Life" or "I Remember You," but as anyone who has ever caught their stage show knows, mostly what they do is make a lot of noise and have a lot of fun -- pretty much what you'd expect from a band specializing in songs like "Monkey Business."So if you heard that Skid Row was in town to play a benefit for the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, you might think the story was somebody's idea of a joke.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 6, 2002
SO BASEBALL realized a strike would be the most idiotic form of self-immolation and here we sit, one week later, happy that our daily dose of sporting theater has not been denied. Even here? Even here at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, where the local nine - or 31 on the expanded roster - recently relieved itself of a 10-game losing skid, only perhaps to have commenced a new one last night. All those Texas long balls. Ouch. It isn't fair, of course. Across the country, a gritty little "small-market" team in green and gold is launching an emphatic assault on baseball's record books.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | November 3, 2003
SUMMIT POINT, W.Va. - As the Audi S4 sedan screams through the straightaway at 95 mph and into a hairpin turn at 50, the smell of burning tires and brake pads fills the air. "Everybody OK?" asks the man behind the wheel, driving instructor Nic Monterastelli. At the moment, this is a tough question to answer. In the front passenger seat is Andrew Chen, a 33-year-old information technology manager from Newark, Del., who is pinned to his head-rest due to a series of G-forces that have momentarily made it difficult to speak.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Staff Writer | August 13, 1992
The camp musical, "Little Shop of Horrors," is getting to be as much of a cult classic as the low-budget 1960 Roger Corman movie thriller on which it is based.The show about a man-eating Venus' flytrap bent on universal conquest is making the rounds in the Baltimore-Metropolitan area. The work, with lyrics and book by the late Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken (creators of lyrics and music for "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast"), is running at the Burn Brae Dinner Theatre through Sept.
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