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By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty | January 12, 1992
The world -- sunlit snow, green pines and skiers gliding off the chairlift -- faded out, then swam back into focus."Are you all right?" asked a lean young man in black pants and a ski mask, popping his skis off and leaning over to check out the recumbent body -- my body -- on the snowbank. "You need to drink lots of liquids when you exercise at this altitude," he continued, pulling off the mask and proffering a water bottle.Fifteen years skiing in the Rockies, and I'd never felt queasy before.
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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
Liberty Mountain Resort has $1 million in new snowmaking equipment ready to roar, but the ski area one hour northwest of Baltimore can't buy a flake this season. The lifts are quiet at nearby Whitetail Resort, which has a Santa video on its website pleading for winter weather, and at Roundtop Mountain Resort, where crews are laboring to lay down a thin layer of white on Fanny Hill and Lafayette's Leap. Even Wisp Resort in colder Western Maryland is operating only four of its 32 runs.
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FEATURES
By Jeff Frees and Jeff Frees,Contributing Writer | January 3, 1993
It's almost predictable. Somewhere along the way, almost every skier is struck by a yearning to ski the world's highest ski area. There is a love of superlatives that seemingly comes with skiing -- the longest run, the steepest run, the fastest time, the best ski . . . and the highest ski area. Any one of these topics can keep skiers consumed in blissful discussion for hours.When it comes to the highest ski area you must be careful because the word "highest" is terribly overused in the ski world.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 29, 2004
I HAVEN'T ATTEMPTED to ski for years, but recently I decided to take another stab at it. I was hoping they'd done something about the gravity problem. Gravity is the biggest drawback to skiing. Without gravity, it would be a carefree activity: You'd put on your skis, head for the slopes and just ... hover for a while. Then it would be time for "apres ski" (French for "no longer skiing"). Instead, you have gravity. Huge amounts of it. Ski areas are located smack dab on top of giant gravity piles called "mountains."
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | September 2, 1991
McHENRY -- When the slopes of the Wisp Ski Area along Deep Creek Lake are in danger of becoming bare during winter, a machine is fired up to make snow.What Wisp's owners need now is a money machine to help them through tough financial times.The owners and Garrett County officials may turn to someone who does have such a machine -- the federal government.Hit hard by several mild winters and a sluggish real estate market, the owners of Wisp have defaulted on a $7 million loan from the Bank of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Harry M. Gould Jr. and Harry M. Gould Jr.,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1996
We probably should have skied back to our hotel here in Meribel, France. Instead, we went to Courchevel for dessert.It didn't seem to matter that it was already past 2:30 p.m., or that some lifts might soon be closing, or that we'd been schussing all day over terrain roughly the size of Liechtenstein on legs gone rubbery from exhaustion, or that the sheer size of this mega-resort known by the French as Les Trois Vallees (the Three Valleys) had already exposed my flawed navigation skills.Obviously, we'd forgotten that the area's 64,500 acres of skiable terrain, 200 interconnected chairlifts and 375 miles of marked Alpine pistes had moved even Sports Illustrated magazine to pronounce the Three Valleys "the largest ski area on Earth."
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker | February 19, 1995
Like many other Marylanders, Helmuth Heise learned to ski on the snow-covered slopes of Marsh Mountain, a 3,000-foot summit that rises from the shores of Deep Creek Lake in Garrett County.There's nothing particularly unusual about that accomplishment -- until one learns that Mr. Heise owns the 23 slopes and trails that traverse the eastern face of the mountain. This entrepreneur put on his first skis only after he began transforming a towering, treeless cow pasture into a makeshift slope some 40 years ago.These days, Mr. Heise, 67, seldom gets to ski his own trails.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 1999
GEORGETOWN, Colo. -- Next weekend, skiers here are to inaugurate the world's highest chairlift. Whisking 1,200 skiers an hour to a 12,700-foot ridge, the lift will offer sweeping views of the Rockies and challenging runs down the Continental Divide.But in a sign of changing times in the nation's most popular skiing state, a Colorado environmentalist is suing, alleging that Loveland Ski Area, the owner of the lift, has violated its federal permit for building on National Forest Service land.
FEATURES
By Kristin Jackson and Kristin Jackson,Seattle Times | November 15, 1992
MOUNT BAKER, Wash. -- I began skiing at Mount Baker as a child in the 1950s and, while both the ski area and I have grown up, I'll always remember it as a place of rope tows and old wood lodges, wet wool and salami.Salami? It was the big treat for us kids after a day's skiing at Baker, deep in Washington's North Cascades. We'd stop at a little general store and buy spicy slices of it to eat in the back seat of the family station wagon as we headed home. Our thick wool pants, sodden from a day of falling in the wet snow, steamed gently in the heat of the car; our hands ached after a day of gripping the rope tows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Eisemann and Tom Renda and Dave Eisemann and Tom Renda,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 1997
As families gather 'round the table for Thanksgiving dinner, the most avid skiers among them may grow fidgety when they learn that at least one nearby ski area has been open a full week."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 2004
BOSTON - The bone-rattling cold that blasted through the Northeast yesterday rocked even the hardiest New Englanders. Tory Bramante, a squid fisherman from Wakefield, Mass., had to stop his boat three times in 24 hours to chip ice off the hull. "We got it pretty bad," Bramante said, describing 25-foot waves that came crashing over his head as he was heading into Boston Harbor from Georges Bank off Cape Cod. "Keep moving, that's all you can do. Stop and you'll freeze up." In New Hampshire, where a number of Democratic presidential candidates were hoping for a warm reception from potential primary voters, the weather was not in the mood.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 19, 2003
McHENRY - Wisp is such a dainty name for a ski area that can plumb tucker you out. The vertical drop from summit to base at the Garrett County resort is just 610 feet - a mere dip in the terrain if you're used to the Adirondack's Whiteface Mountain or the slopes of the Rockies. But that's not the point. Wisp lets a weekend warrior sample downhill and cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, snow biking, tubing and snowboarding without wasting time in the family Suburban Assault Vehicle driving from place to place.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 2002
New Jersey will pay $7.1 million to preserve 1,700 acres on Hamburg Mountain, an environmentally sensitive area in the state's northwestern corner that is home to the Mountain Creek ski area, state officials have reported. In return, the ski area's owners said they would no longer pursue plans to build a golf course. The deal was announced by Gov. James McGreevey and other officials in Vernon, N.J., where the mountain is part of the New Jersey Highlands, a largely untracked wilderness that is home to several endangered species and a watershed for millions of residents.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
An Ellicott City girl who died during a family ski trip in Cornwall, Conn., was identified yesterday as 11-year- old Emily Ehrenreich. Emily, a sixth-grader at Burleigh Manor Middle School whom a family friend called "a delightful, sweet girl," lost control while skiing down an expert-level trail and crashed into a snow-making machine about 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Connecticut State Police said. The machine was not in operation at the time. Yesterday evening, Emily's fellow sixth-graders sent e-mails to each other expressing their shock and grief, said Laurie Orgel, a neighbor whose twin 11-year-old girls were best friends with Emily.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 1999
GEORGETOWN, Colo. -- Next weekend, skiers here are to inaugurate the world's highest chairlift. Whisking 1,200 skiers an hour to a 12,700-foot ridge, the lift will offer sweeping views of the Rockies and challenging runs down the Continental Divide.But in a sign of changing times in the nation's most popular skiing state, a Colorado environmentalist is suing, alleging that Loveland Ski Area, the owner of the lift, has violated its federal permit for building on National Forest Service land.
FEATURES
By Peter Shelton and Peter Shelton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 1998
At dusk on the winding access road to Snowbasin, Utah, mine was the only car. A young moose on toothpick legs tried to get off the roadway and into the woods, but deep snow sent herscrambling back. I stopped. She stared. We both waited. Finally, haltingly, she came forward and, running now, still eyeing me, she scuttled past and on down the hill.Up at the A-frame Hillhaus Lodge, since 1962 a retreat for military personnel stationed at nearby Hill Air Force Base and the only overnight accommodations at the mountain, Barbara Manley leaned out from the rich smell of chili fries and said, "Oh, yeah.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 2002
New Jersey will pay $7.1 million to preserve 1,700 acres on Hamburg Mountain, an environmentally sensitive area in the state's northwestern corner that is home to the Mountain Creek ski area, state officials have reported. In return, the ski area's owners said they would no longer pursue plans to build a golf course. The deal was announced by Gov. James McGreevey and other officials in Vernon, N.J., where the mountain is part of the New Jersey Highlands, a largely untracked wilderness that is home to several endangered species and a watershed for millions of residents.
FEATURES
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 26, 1995
Last season wasn't the greatest for cross-country skiers in most of New England. But there's a bright side to everything -- even a poor snow year.Following the example of their Alpine brethren, a growing number of Nordic areas have installed snowmaking so they can guarantee at least limited cross-country skiing on racing loops and instruction areas. Most XC centers have also greatly improved their techniques for harvesting and storing snow, and all now pay a lot of attention to trail grooming so as to maximize a minimal amount of snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Eisemann and Tom Renda and Dave Eisemann and Tom Renda,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 1997
As families gather 'round the table for Thanksgiving dinner, the most avid skiers among them may grow fidgety when they learn that at least one nearby ski area has been open a full week."
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 2, 1997
Aah. Hot water never felt so good.The frigid mountain temperatures and snow all around us in Steamboat Springs, Colo., made the natural 30-foot wide hot springs all the more inviting. Despite the chill, we'd whipped off our clothes (we had come prepared with bathing suits underneath) and jumped into the large, 4-foot-deep, 104-degree pool, where other families already were soaking away skiing aches.After a day of skiing, we'd wound our way six miles up the mountain north of town to Strawberry Park.
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