Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSkewers
IN THE NEWS

Skewers

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 18, 2004
On November 16, 2004, FRANCES M., devoted wife of the late George W. Skewers, beloved mother of Allan G. Skewers, mother-in-law of Constance Skewers, sister of Clara Wille, Theodore Bienert and William Bienert, grandmother of Jeffrey, Lisa and Megan Skewers and Jessica Williamson. great-grandmother of Justin, Emilee, Nicholas and Jack. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Eckhardt Funeral Chapel, P.A., 11605 Reisterstown Road, Owings Mills, on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral services, Saturday, November 20, at 11 A. M in Holy Cross Polish National Catholic Church, 208 S. Broadway, Baltimore, 21231.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Nothing like piling on when a team's down. Now even The Onion, the satirical publication and website that bills itself as “America's Finest News Source,”  is taking shots at the Orioles. The latest edition skewers the team with a “news brief” and the headline: “ Orioles: We Have Enough Talent To Win 5 More Games This Season .” Despite well over a decade of futility before their hot start this season, the Baltimore Orioles . . . told reporters . . . they trust in one another and believe they have enough talent this year to win five more games.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 12, 2006
Intelligent and robust contempt has become so rare in movies that the first half of Art School Confidential is intermittently exhilarating. Director Terry Zwigoff, best known for the brilliant documentary Crumb and the uproariously foul Xmas farce Bad Santa (emphasis on the X), skewers not just the jocks who taunt the artist hero (Max Minghella) in high school, but the clueless members of his family and, most of all, the pseuds who surround him at the Strathmore Institute, a fashionably decrepit art school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 10, 2011
In an otherwise average episode, "Saturday Night Live" excelled last night in mocking Fox News' morning program "Fox & Friends" and its hosts' propensity for making inaccurate statements.  Co-host Brian Kilmeade (who has criticized Americans for marrying between ethnicities) deservedly caught the mockery the hardest, saying "We almost had the first government shutdown in the history of this country" and "I still don't know what eclectic means. " He also presented a Dave & Buster's gift certificate as his birth certificate.
FEATURES
By KATE SHATZKIN | August 19, 2006
What it is -- Wooden skewers seasoned with essential oils and flavors What we like about it --These skewers promise to deliver flavor quickly to the middle of your meat. The Honey Bourbon skewers announced their potency with a smoky-sweet aroma right out of the package, and they gave grilled chicken kebabs a nice tang. (We still longed for a flavorful sauce on the side, though.) The skewers also come in five other flavors: Citrus Rosemary, Mexican Fiesta, Garlic Herb, Thai Coconut Lime and Indian Mango Curry.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | May 14, 2000
Big burgers, thick steaks or a whole salmon are fine for the Fourth of July, but to ring in the grill season in grand style, try a festive mixed grill on skewers. Besides simplifying menu planning, serving and eating, skewered combinations of vegetables with seafood or chunks of chicken or meat cook very quickly -- an important consideration in case the weather changes abruptly. Even if a sudden downpour sends everybody indoors, the skewers can go under the broiler to finish cooking. Just don't be tempted to move grilling operations into a garage, shed or enclosed porch; carbon monoxide from charcoal or briquettes can easily reach lethal concentrations in enclosed areas.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 19, 2007
In the deepening dusk of a chilly Sunday, I was drawn to a crackling fire. The flames came not from a fireplace, a traditional source of winter warmth, but from my backyard kettle cooker. It was not ideal weather for outdoor activity; the temperature hovered in the 40s and rain loomed on the horizon. But a griller has gotta do what a griller has gotta do, and I had some skewers of meat and vegetables that needed the kind of searing that only a hot, outdoor fire could produce. Moreover, like a moth is drawn to the flame, I was drawn toward the embers by the allure of grilling in December.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2004
It's hard to find a prettier, easier meal than kebabs on the grill: Entree and veggies are cooked together on single-serve skewers. This recipe turns to a fish duo, salmon and grouper, for the main course. The trick to keeping these fish kebabs tender is to turn them frequently while on the grill: You want the fish to be just cooked through and the mushrooms softened. If using bamboo skewers, soak the skewers separately in water for 30 minutes before skewering the fish and vegetables and placing them on the grill.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Kimball and Suzanne Kimball,Contributing Writer | June 24, 1992
Whether it's the joy of being outdoors or the elemental pleasure of playing with fire, come summer we're ready to dust off the grill and fire up the charcoal.Can so much fun be good for you?Yes and no. No to the old-time 16-ounce steak -- per person. Yes to a summer's pleasure grilling your favorites -- meat, fish or fowl -- in moderation.The new food pyramid from the U.S. Department of Agriculture drives home the point: A healthful diet should be heavy on grains and vegetables, light on meat.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 16, 2007
My husband and one of his best friends were born the same year only a day apart and love to celebrate their birthdays together. His pal and his wife are always at their home on Cape Cod in July, so everyone gathers there for the festivities. We always steam lobsters for the main course and order a big cake for dessert, but we vary the appetizers and side dishes year to year. Aware that both our husbands love steak, our hostess added some "turf" to our "surf" menu by preparing delicious beef kebabs as starters.
SPORTS
May 7, 2010
Towson's Matt Hughes is often on the receiving end of some pointed criticism from coach Tony Seaman. But Hughes said he doesn't mind the panning too much. "He seems to yell at me a lot during practice," Hughes said with a laugh. "He continues to tell me it's for my own good, that he only yells at me because he knows I can be a good player. I believe him. I feel like I'm starting to play with more confidence in every game." The freshman attackman is beginning to display that confidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2009
Famous Yakitori One Restaurant is new in Lower Charles Village. Three popular Korean restaurants are within a few blocks, and there are a few Korean dishes on Yakitori One's menu. Maybe that's a given. But the specialty at this Japanese restaurant is - you guessed it - yakitori, those little grilled and skewered appetizers you find in many Japanese restaurants. Yakitori literally means grilled chicken, but the term is liberally applied, at least here, not only to parts of the chicken, but to bits of vegetable, meat and seafood, too. The very young owner here is Jae Kim, and Yakitori One has an infectiously youthful and arty ambience.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWIN | September 1, 2008
A 10-year-old Anne Arundel County boy suffered a serious eye injury yesterday at the Maryland Renaissance Festival in Crownsville when he accidentally stuck a wooden skewer in his eye, a county Fire Department spokesman said. The boy, whose name was not released, was with his father at a food concession called "Steak on a Stake" about 5 p.m. when he pulled the wooden skewer from his mouth and accidentally stuck it in his eye, Lt. Frank Fennell said. Fennell said the father immediately took his son to a nearby first-aid station.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | August 13, 2008
Grilled vegetables are healthful, delicious and perfect for summertime meals. But the truth is that great vegetables - evenly cooked, tender yet with a nice brown finish on the outside - are one of the hardest grilling tasks to tackle. I cooked my way through a couple of pounds of vegetables and discovered that the single biggest determinant of successful grilled vegetables is how you cut them. You want to make the pieces long and/or wide, so they don't fall through the grate. You want to make them sturdy, so they don't fall apart.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 2, 2008
Hancock , the redemption tale of a feckless Los Angeles superhero, is named, in a roundabout way, for John Hancock, the patriot with the indelible signature. But it might as well have been named for the insurance company. The first half is diverting and inventive. But the filmmakers use the second half as a box-office insurance policy. They fill it with the conventional super-heroics and heartbreak that they spend the first 45 minutes gleefully deconstructing. Hancock swings into action in ragged street clothes: Tthe only "costume" he wears is a wool watch cap with an eagle stitched into the front of it. Mostly he sports 10 different kinds of grimaces as he demonstrates super-strength, the power of flight and an ultra-blase attitude to any piece of machinery or property that gets in his way. Happily, Will Smith is just as creative and persuasive as a homeless superman as he was playing the homeless businessman in The Pursuit of Happyness.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 19, 2007
In the deepening dusk of a chilly Sunday, I was drawn to a crackling fire. The flames came not from a fireplace, a traditional source of winter warmth, but from my backyard kettle cooker. It was not ideal weather for outdoor activity; the temperature hovered in the 40s and rain loomed on the horizon. But a griller has gotta do what a griller has gotta do, and I had some skewers of meat and vegetables that needed the kind of searing that only a hot, outdoor fire could produce. Moreover, like a moth is drawn to the flame, I was drawn toward the embers by the allure of grilling in December.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | June 18, 2000
Now that we've had a stretch of sizzling weather, it's time to sizzle some shrimp -- or, as we say in Baltimore, "shrimps" -- on the grill. Even though you can cook them in almost any season, I prefer to wait until it is "barefoot weather" to start grilling my "shrimps." That is because I associate grilled shrimp with spending a week at the beach; a stretch of time when footwear and most outwear is minimal. I won't be bound for the beach for several weeks, but the recent stretch of hot weather got me thinking about the ocean, kicking off my shoes and grilling some shrimps.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | August 1, 2007
August has arrived, and in Baltimore that means many of us want to avoid cooking entirely. But we still want to eat, of course, and we might even want to entertain. One solution is to make something pretty out of material that's cool, readily available and at its peak: fresh fruit. Baltimore International College chef instructor Ben Simpkins showed us how to make a centerpiece for the picnic table with a few basic supplies. You'll need wooden skewers that can be cut into various lengths, toothpicks, a sharp paring knife, and some leaf and flower-shaped cookie cutters.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 16, 2007
My husband and one of his best friends were born the same year only a day apart and love to celebrate their birthdays together. His pal and his wife are always at their home on Cape Cod in July, so everyone gathers there for the festivities. We always steam lobsters for the main course and order a big cake for dessert, but we vary the appetizers and side dishes year to year. Aware that both our husbands love steak, our hostess added some "turf" to our "surf" menu by preparing delicious beef kebabs as starters.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | August 1, 2007
August has arrived, and in Baltimore that means many of us want to avoid cooking entirely. But we still want to eat, of course, and we might even want to entertain. One solution is to make something pretty out of material that's cool, readily available and at its peak: fresh fruit. Baltimore International College chef instructor Ben Simpkins showed us how to make a centerpiece for the picnic table with a few basic supplies. You'll need wooden skewers that can be cut into various lengths, toothpicks, a sharp paring knife, and some leaf and flower-shaped cookie cutters.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.