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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Baltimore Development Corp.'s president, M.J. "Jay" Brodie, said Thursday that he is on the mend after an ice skating injury that has kept him sidelined for much of the past two months. Brodie, 73, told directors of the economic development agency that he has been under doctor's orders to rest his right leg after it became inflamed in early April. Brodie, an avid skater, said he noticed pain and swelling in his leg after skating twice in late March. He said that he did not fall or break his leg, and that tests uncovered no fractures or torn muscles.
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
For the first time in about a decade, outdoor ice skating could return to the Inner Harbor with the creation of a temporary rink at McKeldin Square. Baltimore's spending panel approved an agreement Wednesday with the Waterfront Partnership, which hopes a temporary rink will bring more city residents and visitors to the harbor during the slower winter months. But the nonprofit must raise $250,000 by Labor Day to pull off the plans. Other efforts to revive skating at the harbor have failed since an outdoor rink at Rash Field in Federal Hill was closed when its aging equipment could not keep the ice cold enough.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
A skating rink in Woodlawn that police say consistently causes law enforcement problems has been granted a few more days to come up with a plan that might allow it to remain open for business. The reprieve came from a Baltimore County code enforcement officer, Meg Ferguson, who upheld a decision to revoke Skateworks' license but left the door open for discussions with the facility's owners about how to save the skating rink. The four owners now have until Wednesday to convince county officials of their commitment to avoid disruptions that police say have been caused by large crowds entering or leaving the facility at 1716 Whitehead Road.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A "B" and a "T" are etched into the black stone floor at Zumiez to remember Brianna Benlolo and Tyler Johnson. Customers might not even notice the understated initials at the entrance of the Mall in Columbia skate shop. Not unless they were staring at the ground - an unlikely proposition in a newly redecorated store whose displays call out for attention with brightly colored clothing, loud slogans and giant posters. Nonetheless, the letters are there, solemn memorials to the two young people who died Jan. 25 when 19-year-old Darion Aguilar opened fire in the store before killing himself.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Vaughan Mason's personalized license plate displays his lifelong credo for success: "FAILURE." Before you raise a jaundiced eye, keep in mind that he's a musician who is still getting paid for work he did in the 1970s and '80s. And if you were part of the nightclub or roller-skating scene then, chances are you're familiar with one of his efforts: Bounce. Roccccccccccccccck. Skate. Rolllllllllllllllllllllll. Bounce. It's been almost 27 years since Mason recorded the pulsating ode to roller-skating, "Bounce, Rock, Skate, Roll," which took him from living on the sofa of a friend's brownstone apartment in Brooklyn (five houses down from Spike Lee, no less)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
Baltimore County will allow a Woodlawn roller skating rink to remain open another week while the county code enforcement officer decides whether to revoke its license. Enforcement officer Meg Ferguson issued the order Thursday to give herself "sufficient time for proper consideration of the evidence and testimony" before deciding the fate of Skateworks, which county officials say is straining police resources, tying up traffic and violating the closing time spelled out on its license by staying open past midnight.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 31, 2002
HAVE YOU EVER wondered how professional journalists cover an international sporting event? Too bad, because I'm going to tell you. In February I spent three weeks at the Winter Olympics in Utah ("Where the Party Never Stops Until 8:30 p.m."). I was part of the press corps swarming around in thermal underwear, asking penetrating questions such as: (1) Who won this event? (2) How can you tell? (3) What is this event called again? As you can see, the Olympic press corps does not always have a solid grasp on the events it's covering.
FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Special to The Evening Sun | November 21, 1990
Courtney Winer, an 8-year-old student at Pot Spring Elementary School in Timonium, cut right to the chase.She used The Evening Sun's call-in line to ask a simple question of celebrity ice-skaters Brian Boitano and Katarina Witt: "Has skating been worth the things you gave up in your childhood and teen-age years?"Boitano and Witt, who brought their show, "Skating II," to the Baltimore Arena last night, more than agreed that their sacrifices have been well-rewarded. Boitano is even reluctant to admit that he made sacrifices.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
Nearly three years after his dream burned to the ground, Harry W. Morfoot is ready to fulfill the promise he made to patrons of the Sportsman's Hall roller rink on June 21, 1992.After several false starts, Mr. Morfoot finally poured new footers for a rebuilt rink in Arcadia last week, signaling the return of the roller skating mecca that had been a gathering place for generations."There were big, 250 to 300-pound men with beards and mustaches standing around crying," Mr. Morfoot said, recalling that June 1992 evening when arson destroyed the rink.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1995
LANDOVER -- For four days afterward, Alexander Zhulin and Maia Usova went back to the rink in Lake Placid, N.Y., where their friend and countryman, Sergei Grinkov, had died.For four days, they tried to skate, tried to prepare for an ice show that was ultimately postponed, tried to continue with their lives."We would skate for about 15 minutes, then we would stop and cry," Zhulin recalled yesterday.A week after Grinkov's death from a massive heart attack at age 28, these former world champion and 1994 Olympic silver medalist ice dancers went to perform at a show in New York's Central Park.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
Comments and observations about the U.S. Olympic speed skating team should cover the gamut of possible influences as to the unexpected results of the competition ( "In Sochi, Under Armour skates into some sturm und drang," Feb. 15). It seems very strange to me that so many are quick to point to a very thin, sleek, and I am sure almost weightless, suit as being the culprit for outcomes that have not resulted in winning Olympic medals. I have competed in athletics for many years, not anywhere close to the Olympic level, but regardless of the level, I do know that for each and every sport there is a myriad of areas that influence outcomes.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 15, 2014
What are the lessons from the flap over Under Armour's Mach 39 speed skater suit and its supposed connection to the U.S. team's poor early showing at the Winter Olympics? Walk with me, let's talk. If you follow flaps — and who doesn't? — you know that some American speed skaters suggested that the new super-suits were not so super. In fact, some thought the suits were a real drag. The Mach 39 has an oval-shaped mesh vent on the back to relieve skaters of body heat, and that appears to be why, late last week, there was a lot of sturm und drang from Sochi.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Christalyn Trimilove was about 6 years old when her father, Paul, took her skating at the Benfield Pines Ice Rink in Millersville, a once-popular local facility that has since closed. Trimilove, a lifelong resident of Severna Park, has mixed memories of that first time on the ice. "What in the world are you doing to me and what is on my feet?" she recalls thinking. "After that, he took me to some more public sessions and signed me up for group lessons. I kind of fell in love with it. " Within about six months of those first lessons, she had won a gold medal in a low-level competition against some other young girls.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Separate stabbing incidents in Baltimore and in Baltimore County overnight left one man dead and four people injured, police in both jurisdictions said Sunday. In the Baltimore confrontation, city police said, 19-year-old Jesse Clark-Nugent died early Sunday after he was stabbed multiple times inside the Two O'Clock Club in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St. Two others were injured in the strip club along The Block. A 30-year-old man stabbed in the neck and a 17-year-old boy stabbed in the torso are expected to survive, police said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Aerospace firm Sigma Space Corp. has joined fellow Maryland companies Under Armour and Lockheed Martin in developing technology to help the U.S. Speedskating team at the Winter Olympics. Lanham-based Sigma Space said Friday its optical and mechanical engineers have been at work on a secret project since the fall to enhance skaters performance. Through its "Blade Runner" mission, the company aimed to build a tool that could polish skate blade sides, which never go through the sharpening common to blade bottoms.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
For decades, Kay McConnell and her family joined those who lace up skates and take to Lake Roland in Robert E. Lee Park when winter freezes ice over the former reservoir. The McConnells' three children were on the ice as young as toddlers, one of them using an old sled as a walker of sorts. After measuring the ice to be at least 5 inches thick, with at least five days of sub-freezing temperatures, neighbors around the lake's north end would flock to the ice - so long as snowfall didn't make the surface too bumpy.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- This time, she will not skate for a medal. She will not vamp and flirt with a crowd, a Carmen on skates, dying like a fluttering butterfly.Katarina Witt is 28 now, a woman who speaks of peace and perspective.For her, the killing in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, is a source of pain, the chase for an Olympic gold a source of bemusement.The woman who was once the face of East Germany to the world, is at a Winter Olympics for the first time since 1988, representing one Germany, united.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | November 20, 1990
"I'll be dying 27 times," Olympic gold medalist Katarina Witt says wryly, as she thinks about performing the role of "Carmen" on ice in a new show that's just begun a five-month tour."Skating II" -- which will be performed at 7:30 tonight at the Baltimore Arena -- features Ms. Witt together with fellow Olympian Brian Boitano and an international cast of 12 world-class skaters.The East German skating star will be in the spotlight five times during the evening. As a finale, she and Mr. Boitano will perform the death scene from the HBO movie, "Carmen on Ice," which won the pairEmmy Awards.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Anxious employees had many questions as they gathered in movie theater seats for a security briefing on their first day back to work at The Mall in Columbia since a deadly weekend shooting: How can workers spot threats? Are there enough security cameras? How did the shooter conceal his weapon? Howard County Police Chief Bill McMahon reminded workers that the mall has for years been a secure and friendly gathering place for Columbia and the surrounding area, though he acknowledged that the shooting has left an indelible mark.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
When he heard the news that there'd been a shooting at the Zumiez store at The Mall in Columbia, Abhishek Rishi posted a panicked message hoping for a phone call from his friend. His worst fears were soon confirmed. Brianna Benlolo was dead. "She was a very caring, heartwarming person," said Rishi, who knew Benlolo because both had worked at the mall. "She never said anything bad about anybody. She was just one of those people you wanted to be around. She was just genuinely happy.
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