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NEWS
August 11, 1995
"Dead at 53? Of natural causes?"So went the reaction of one contemporary of Grateful Dead guitarist Jerry Garcia. Although hardly a die-hard "Deadhead" himself, this fan is still a "relic of the Sixties" -- at least in the eyes of his twenty-something daughter.Relics of the Sixties -- and admirers of the Grateful Dead -- are everywhere these days, from the White House and Capitol Hill to job sites grand and small across the land. Reporters searching for reactions to Mr. Garcia's death found devotees everywhere, across the generations and across political lines.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
For The Atlantic  the distinguished linguist Geoffrey Nunberg has produced an article, "When Slang Becomes a Slur,"  about the controversy over the name of the Washington Redskins.  Don't pass over it without clicking. It is a thoughtful, substantial article that moves from the controversy over the team name to a deeper understanding of the interplay between language and culture. (You'd be better off reading that than this.)  Mr. Nunberg looks at a number of derogatory words that used to be in common use but which over the past half-century have come to be shunned as unacceptable for public discourse, and labeled as such in dictionaries.  Here's a salient paragraph: " That all started to change in the '60s, though it took dictionaries a while to catch up. The sea change in social attitudes that led to the civil rights acts of 1964 and 1965 also transformed the way we talked about race and ethnicity.
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 21, 1991
"Making Sense of the Sixties" tries to do that, in large part, for TTC those who did not live through that era, an aim that explains both the strengths and weaknesses of this ambitious PBS documentary series.Co-executive producer Ricki Green of Washington's WETA saiat a recent press conference that part of the motivation for making the series was hearing questions from her own children about this most turbulent of decades.Thus the documentary, which will air two episodes on threconsecutive nights starting tonight at 9 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67, might sound to those who remember these years as if it has the tone of a junior high school lecture.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
Here's a number that ought to be memorized by every elected official in the state of Maryland: 485. That's how many people died in traffic collisions in 2011 in this state (the most recent year for which such statistics are available from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). That's the equivalent of about 10 full motor coaches. Yet the number that's being discussed these days in the General Assembly is 70. That's how fast, in miles per hour, some believe motorists should be allowed to drive on certain state highways, and under the circumstances, it's more than a little surprising that raising the speed limit is even on the legislative agenda.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 12, 1993
BERKELEY IN THE SIXTIES(PBS, $79.95, not rated, 1990)If there is a single place most associated with the counterculture and the anti-war demonstrations of the 1960s it has to be Berkeley, Calif.Producer-director Mark Kitchell has assembled an amazing collection of black-and-white and color news footage and student home movies of seemingly every significant sit-in, rally and protest coordinated by the students at the University of California and the more militant Black Panthers in nearby Oakland.
FEATURES
January 23, 1999
Next month, The Sixties," a new TV mini-series sure to focus on assassinations, anti-war protests, drugs, sex and sit-ins, begins airing. But it's going to lack a key element: you.We want to hear about -- and see -- your Sixties' experiences: groovy or goofy, militant or mellow.Send us a picture of yourself from the Sixties. Tell us briefly when and where the photo was shot and -- if you can recall -- what was going on. (Photos cannot be returned.)Or, in 100 words or less, tell us about your most memorable Sixties moment.
FEATURES
January 27, 1999
Next Month, "The '60s" a new TV mini series sure to focus on assassinations, anti-war protests, drugs, sex and sit-ins, begins airing. But it's going to lack a key element: you.We want to hear about -- and see -- your Sixties' experiences: groovy or goofy. militant or mellow.Send us a picture of yourself from the Sixties. Tell us briefly when and where the photo was shot and -- if you can recall -- what was going on. (Photos cannot be returned.)Or, in 100 words or less, tell us about your most memorable Sixties moment.
FEATURES
January 20, 1999
Next month, a new TV mini-series begins airing about that mythological decade, the Sixties. It promises to be full of melodrama involving assassinations, anti-war protests, drugs, sex and sit-ins. But it's going to lack a key element: you.The '60s were not just a time of civil strife; they were a time of ordinary folks coping with a changing world. Like learning to dance the watusi, trying to play "I Am the Walrus" backward on the record player, or learning to love love beads. It's this kind of day-to-day Sixties we want to celebrate.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 20, 1991
"Making Sense of the Sixties" is six hours of television that is short on memory and devoid of any real vision. That can make for frustrating viewing -- a long trip via the television set that ultimately takes you almost nowhere in terms of understanding the 1960s or the demographic bulge known as baby boomers, which entered early adulthood then and has dominated American popular culture ever since.But that doesn't mean "Making Sense of the Sixties," which begins at 9 tomorrow on MPT (Channels 22 and 67)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 20, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Like "Eyes on the Prize" and "The Civil War," "Making Sense of the Sixties" largely involves statements by participants in the events depicted, as well as by analysts of the period.PBS brought three of them -- Claude Brown, author of "Manchild in the Promised Land"; Annie Gottlieb, author of "Do You Believe in Magic? Bringing the Sixties Back Home"; and Hendrik Hertzberg, editor of the New Republic -- to a recent press conference about the show. Here are excerpts from their comments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
When the reign of Oliver Cromwell and his fellow killjoys ended, one of the first things the new English king did was order the theaters to reopen. Charles II didn't stop there. He allowed those theaters to do something previously unthinkable — engage women to act onstage. If that didn't signal the fall of Puritanism, nothing would. Those wild and crazy1660s also saw the rise of England's first successful female playwright, Aphra Behn. And that chapter from the Restoration inspired "Or," a comic work by Liz Duffy Adams that receives its regional premiere this week from Rep Stage in Columbia.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
One harsh winter long ago, as he led an encampment of soldiers near a European forest, it never occurred to Alfred H.M. Shehab, then a brash young Army lieutenant, that he and his 30-man unit were a part of military history. "A platoon leader is so busy thinking about what might happen and how to make things go right" that it's hard to grasp much of a broader perspective, says Shehab, a 91-year-old retired lieutenant colonel who lives near Fort Meade. As it was, the 3rd Platoon of B Troop in the 38th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized)
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2007
April 15, 1947, dawned cold and gloomy in Brooklyn. And the day never got much brighter for the Dodger who stood at the center of so much attention. Rookie first baseman Jackie Robinson went hitless in four at-bats against Boston Braves offspeed specialist Johnny Sain. "I did a miserable job," his biographer, Arnold Rampersad, quoted Robinson as writing in a letter. "There was an overflow crowd at Ebbets Field. If they expected any miracles out of Robinson, they were sadly disappointed."
NEWS
By MARK CARO and MARK CARO,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
He's not losing his hair, although color seems to be an issue. He does have grandchildren, although no Vera, Chuck or Dave. He has been known to do a little gardening work, "digging the weed," so to speak. In fact, one of his multiple marijuana busts was for growing the stuff on his Scottish farm back in the early '70s. Given the recent upheaval in his personal life, it's unclear who will feed him, although there's no doubt he'll be taken care of. Yes, the cultural alarm clock that Paul McCartney set 39 years ago is ringing.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
Ever since the curtain went up Oct. 2, 1871, on its first production -- Shakespeare's As You Like It, starring James W. Wallack -- Ford's Theater came to symbolize the legitimate stage for generations of Baltimore theatergoers. But from the time of its founding, Ford's meant something else to African-Americans who were excluded from purchasing orchestra or box seats and banished to the theater's second balcony. On Feb. 17, 1946 -- 60 years ago yesterday -- the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People began picketing against the now-demolished Fayette Street theater's discriminatory seating policy.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
He didn't know much about his uncle then; after all, Eugene Patrick Hines was only 6 when they brought the man home. All he remembers from those somber days in the family home on Fayette Street was wanting to peek inside the casket. "All the grown-ups said my uncle was such a great man," said Hines, 63, yesterday, at a special ceremony for the man for whom he was named, Father Eugene Patrick O'Grady, the Baltimore-born priest who became, at 35, the only Maryland National Guard chaplain to die on a European battlefield during World War II. "My mother couldn't tell me why I couldn't look in. I guess it was too delicate for a little boy."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 5, 1994
Boston. -- Now we're getting down to the nitty-gritty. We're talking money. Money-losing. Money-making. Money-grubbing. Bill and Hillary's money, money, money.When this couple walked onto the national stage two years ago, they carried with them all the baggage of the 1960s from its music to its message.There was her change-the-world commencement speech at Wellesley. There was his anti-Vietnam letter from Oxford.He had held marijuana to his lips. She had held onto her own name. Hillary became a surrogate for how we feel about the changing roles of women and Bill became a surrogate for how we feel about marriages that go bump in the night.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 4, 1995
White-bread and mayonnaise styles of the Sixties have been spiced up and recycled for next spring. Muffy as muse? Both young designers and old houses tapped suburbia and the country club for ideas.Women who remember Liberty prints, madras plaids, Aigner straw satchels and Pappagallo flats as summer staples will feel a jolt because these are not your basic mummy designs.Hold on to your Bermuda bags! Anna Sui took the Villager look downtown to the Village blowing up the floral prints to upholstery-sized scale.
NEWS
By TODD RICHISSIN and TODD RICHISSIN,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
NEUNBURG VORM WALD, Germany - Those sounds, those terrible sounds are what people here recall most vividly from 60 years ago, perhaps because what they heard has never really gone away. They hear the echoes, still. The people of this beautiful and ugly town who were here during the final days of World War II still hear the sobbing, the pleading, the cries of skeletal men one breath from dead. They hear the gunshots, hear the brief and sickening quiet, then the soft slap of bodies falling in heaps on gravel and grass and blood-dampened sand.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | September 28, 2003
Sixty-Six, by Barry Levinson. Broadway Books. 288 pages. $24. Barry Levinson's first novel reads like outtakes from a diner movie yet to be made. The names are different, but not the types. The guys are still hanging out at the old Hilltop Diner, and their sarcasm still lands gentle as shrapnel. But the world around them has changed while they were looking the other way. The big difference is time, and rites of passage. The guys no longer wrap their lives strictly around the Baltimore Colts and the transition from adolescence to adulthood.
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