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Sixth Grade

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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
EMILY MAUNZ AND I taught English at Baltimore's Northeast Middle School Wednesday.Actually, Maunz taught sixth grade most of the day. That's her job. I filled in for her for 45 minutes. It was Teach For America Week, described in a TFA news release as "a nationwide event that calls upon successful Americans to share their knowledge and expertise with pupils in the classrooms of Teach For America corps members."Corps member Maunz, 23, wasn't born when I earned a living as an English teacher in New York in 1963.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
When Jisoo Choi moved to the United States from South Korea at the age of 6, all she knew of the English language was the alphabet. But this week Choi, a 13-year-old eighth-grader at Burleigh Manor Middle School, was honored as the winner of the Letters about Literature national writing contest, which asks students in grades four through 12 to write to an author of a book - living or dead - about how the work changed their perspective on themselves or...
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NEWS
By HAL PIPER | November 13, 1993
There's always hope. Sixth-graders, at least, still have common sense, as I learned recently when I was lucky enough to spend a little time with Cathy Walrod's class at Dundalk Middle School.The Baltimore County middle schools have a program called DEAR, an acronym for Drop Everything And Read. Time is scheduled each day for students to do just that. They bring their own books -- anything they want -- and at the assigned time classes and activities stop and kids just read for the pleasure of it.Sometimes a guest reader is invited to share a book.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
By the dozens, Hollifield Station Elementary students darted along a pair of 1/16th-mile ovals on the school's lower field, high-fiving teachers with each completed lap. Along the periphery stood parents and members of the school's PTA, all agreeing that this activity sure beat another gift-wrap sale or pizza party. Hollifield Station is the first in Howard County to employ a fundraising program called Boosterthon Fun Run, a fundraising tool for school-age children designed to "speed up" traditional walk-a-thons and add elements of character and leadership building.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 8, 1993
The kids went back to school the other day, thus ending a two-month period during which the house took on all the calm of Saturday night in Tijuana.Look, you can mark me down right now as favoring the concept of year-round school. In fact, I'd favor a bill requiring kids to put in a full day in class and then two or three hours on a loading dock before they're allowed home in the evening.My wife keeps whining that our kids are too young to be wrestling refrigerators into the hull of a freighter.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2003
The first sixth-grade class since 1978 at George G. Kelson Elementary School was formally celebrated last week at an event marking the completion of the first phase of a community-based renovation project worth more than $500,000. In order for more children from the West Baltimore community of Sandtown-Winchester to attend middle school in their own neighborhood, officials from The Enterprise Foundation and Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse paired to donate time, money and resources to Kelson to expand the school by three grades.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Woodbridge Elementary School will add a sixth grade next year, the Baltimore County school board decided last night, marking the first step in a broader push by parents to keep children in neighborhood schools through middle school.The action, which will keep about 60 sixth-graders a year at Woodbridge -- which now ends at grade five -- comes in response to a parent proposal to ease crowding at Southwest Academy and keep Woodbridge Valley children in their neighborhood through eighth grade.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
Anne Arundel County sixth-graders posted a significant gain on reading tests this spring after the first year of an intensive language arts program, while county pupils continued to score above the national median in all subjects tested. Scores went up in all subjects except science on the TerraNova, formerly called the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills. For the most part, the gains were slight - just a point or two - but officials said the county's efforts to improve instruction are paying off. "Anytime you show improvement you're pleased, because it's an indication that students are performing better and teachers are being more successful," said interim Superintendent Kenneth P. Lawson.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
The private operator of three failing Baltimore elementaries wants to extend its reach by adding sixth grade at each school, a step the for-profit company says has been prompted by staunch support from parents. New York-based Edison Schools has asked to amend its five-year contract with the state to include sixth-grade pupils at Furman L. Templeton, Gilmor and Montebello, where the company took over in July amid some criticism from city education officials. The arrangement, if approved, would affect about 260 pupils who normally would enroll in regular city middle schools next academic year.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
Now that it's over, sixth grade really wasn't so bad. Everyone agrees that Ms. Turner's class rocked. It's hard enough for a teacher to hold pupils' attention during a regular day when they are 11 or 12, but she did it even yesterday, the last day of school. Ms. Turner pushes all the desks out of the way and puts all the chairs in a circle, except one, which is in the middle. Everyone takes turns sitting in the middle while everyone else says nice things about you. Things like, "If you're yelling at me at lunch and I say something, you always have a great comeback" and "You have the biggest binder that I've ever seen, yet you can pull papers out of it and you know where they are."
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 9, 2013
The middle school years are the most mystifying time. They enter middle school in the sixth grade as little kids and exit in the eighth grade well on their way to becoming young adults. In the years in between, they try to figure out their own identities, including who their friends will be. What do you do when you don't like the friends your child is hanging around with? I've been wrestling with this question. On the one hand, I think it is impossible to dictate to my son who his friends should and shouldn't be. He'll probably want to do the opposite of what I say anyway.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Garrison Forest senior field hockey goalie Kendall Kuntz, 17, played just three games last year. They were three important games, however, as she helped the Grizzlies win in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference quarterfinals and semifinals before leaving after the first half of the championship game. A starter on Garrison Forest's 2010 IAAM championship team, she didn't play during the 2011 regular season due to a broken right foot. But when she returned for the playoffs, Kuntz picked up where she left off at the end of her sophomore season.
EXPLORE
August 16, 2012
Central Library 10375 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia. 410-313-7800. •All Together Now. Saturdays, 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. All ages; 30 minutes. •English Conversation Club. Mondays, 10 a.m.; and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Practice speaking and understanding English in a group setting. Register before attending. •Family Movies. Aug. 21, 3 p.m. "Charlotte's Web. " •Kindergarten, Here We Come. Thu., Aug. 16, 4 p.m.; Fri., Aug. 17, 2 p.m.; and Sat., Aug. 18, 2 and 3:30 p.m. Stories and activities to help mark the important first day. Registration required.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | September 24, 2009
The president has declined to talk about racism in connection with the carpet-chewers of the Right who are suffering road rage over his existence, and he's wise to turn that one down. The country doesn't need a sermon on race or civility right now. What it needs is to believe that our leaders are trying to do the right thing, no matter how inconvenient, and if they forge ahead and fix health insurance, then the ragemeisters of the Right will find other hobbies. Mr. Obama is a Chicago guy, and he doesn't wilt if some gin-crazed cracker from South Carolina calls him a liar, so don't trouble your pretty head about civility.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2008
A sixth-grade girl at Perry Hall Middle School lied about being sexually assaulted this week in a school restroom, Baltimore County police said yesterday. Based on their investigation, police concluded that the incident did not occur, said Bill Toohey, a county police spokesman. Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said that prosecutors have reviewed the facts of the case and decided not to charge the 11-year-old girl. "The [girl's] family acted extremely appropriately," Shellenberger said, "and we've decided that the situation is better handled in the family and not in the criminal justice system."
NEWS
April 17, 1995
Six students from St. Jane Frances School were selected from 18 participants at the school as winners of the Optimist Oratorical Contest.The students were asked to write an original four- to five-minute speech on the topic "Listen to Me." District winners will receive a $1,500 scholarship.The winners are:* First place -- Christopher Holub, seventh grade, and Lauren Hammond, sixth grade.* Second place -- Mary Margaret Kay, seventh grade, and Matthew Naylor, seventh grade.* Third place -- Mia DiBene, sixth grade, and Bradley Gannon, seventh grade.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | August 27, 1991
ELEVEN YEAR-OLD Eric Brooks will say goodbye to summer, his best friends and his favorite pair of jeans when he starts the sixth grade in September. He'll be attending the all-male
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