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SPORTS
May 13, 1992
There was a surprise arrival this week at Pimlico -- at least to Bill Donovan, the Maryland trainer of Preakness probable Dash for Dotty.Donovan was called to the stable gate."
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NEWS
November 15, 2005
William B. Bryant, 94, the first African-American to serve as chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, died Sunday in Washington. Friday, President Bush signed legislation to name a new $110 million, nine-courtroom addition to the federal courthouse in Judge Bryant's honor - a measure introduced by Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District's delegate to the House of Representatives, along with legislation to name a federal building in Detroit for Rosa Parks. Judge Bryant, who continued hearing cases as a senior judge until recently, was nominated to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1965 after distinguishing himself in private practice and as a federal prosecutor in Washington.
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FEATURES
By Patrick T. Reardon and Patrick T. Reardon,Chicago Tribune | July 12, 1993
Sitting Bull was a great man whose tragedy it was to achieve greatness at the moment of his civilization's death.In any era, he would have been a leader. He was born with a rugged body, a deep mind and an acute sensitivity to the world of the spirit. He grew into a warrior of bravery and a mystic dream-seer, a man wise in his knowledge and in his understanding of his Sioux people.His times, however, were unique. Whites, armed with superior weapons and a deadly efficient approach to war, were invading the western plains, chasing out and killing the buffalo and squeezing the nomadic Sioux onto ever-smaller reservations, finally demanding that the Native Americans give up the hunt and become farmers.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2002
It's all true. A small-town girl who was a phenomenal shot with a rifle became one of the stars of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show under the name of Annie Oakley and toured the United States and Europe. Sitting Bull, leader of the Indians who had defeated Custer and the 7th Cavalry at the Little Big Horn, joined the show, too. He became so fond of Annie that he adopted her as a daughter. Buffalo Bill ran into stiff competition from another showman, Pawnee Bill, and the two shows merged rather than go broke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edwin O. Guthman and Edwin O. Guthman,Special to the Sun | March 5, 2000
"American By Blood," by Andrew Huebner. Simon and Schuster. 245 pages. $23. The sun is already turning hot on the morning of July 26, 1876, when three U.S. Army scouts come in view of a hill overlooking the Little Big Horn River in Dakota Territory and discover the sickening, bloody remains of Lt. Col. George Custer, his 7th Cavalry troopers and their horses as wild dogs feed on the bodies and black crows hover overhead. With that grim scene Andrew Huebner begins his first novel. It unfolds with a moving, detailed, descriptive account of the Army's reaction to Custer's defeat, its pursuit of the Sioux, led by their now legendary chiefs, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, and the Army's vengeful attacks as well on other tribes -- the Cheyennes and the Nez Perce.
FEATURES
By DAN VITALE | October 28, 1990
Buffalo Girls.Larry McMurtry.Simon & Schuster.351 pages. $19.95.In his fourth novel since the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Lonesome Dove," Larry McMurtry once again seeks to lay bare the harsh realities that served as fodder for the mythology of the Old West, continuing work he performed most recently in "Anything for Billy" (1988), a retelling of the story of Billy the Kid.According to Mr. McMurtry, the process that turned the denizens of the West into pageant heroes -- jazzing them up for the purposes of popular entertainment -- obscured the pain of their actual lives.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 22, 2001
It would have been almost un-American not to love this show. Annie Get Your Gun, as presented by Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers during a nearly sold-out run, featured Irving Berlin's great tunes well-sung, a lively orchestra, a stage full of cowboys - and a couple of authentic American heroes looking for love. For two weekends at AACC's Pascal Center, a youthful, high-spirited cast of 25 brought to life the story of Annie Oakley, a country girl whose sharpshooting skills brought her into vaudeville and to worldwide fame.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2002
It's all true. A small-town girl who was a phenomenal shot with a rifle became one of the stars of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show under the name of Annie Oakley and toured the United States and Europe. Sitting Bull, leader of the Indians who had defeated Custer and the 7th Cavalry at the Little Big Horn, joined the show, too. He became so fond of Annie that he adopted her as a daughter. Buffalo Bill ran into stiff competition from another showman, Pawnee Bill, and the two shows merged rather than go broke.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 25, 1991
Holly Pasciullo makes a perky Annie Oakley in the Cockpit in the Court production of ''Annie Get Your Gun.'' Actually, everything about the show is perky, thanks to a very capable cast and the more than capable direction of Todd Pearthree, who also did the choreography.The dancing is rather elaborate for the Cockpit in the Court, but Pearthree manages very well with an accomplished group of young men and women.''Annie Get Your Gun'' was first presented in New York in 1946, where it ran for 1,147 performances.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 25, 1991
Irving Berlin's "Annie Get Your Gun" is about as politically incorrect as you can get these days. Not only does the script, by Herbert and Dorothy Fields, provide a retrograde, ugga-wugga-style picture of American Indians, but the heroine, Annie Oakley, only gets her man when she pretends to be less competent than he is.Cockpit in Court's production doesn't do anything to tone down these political gaffes. To the contrary, Todd Pearthree, who directed and choreographed the show, seems to go overboard exaggerating them; the dance numbers featuring bare-midriffed squaws look like parodies, at best.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 22, 2001
It would have been almost un-American not to love this show. Annie Get Your Gun, as presented by Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers during a nearly sold-out run, featured Irving Berlin's great tunes well-sung, a lively orchestra, a stage full of cowboys - and a couple of authentic American heroes looking for love. For two weekends at AACC's Pascal Center, a youthful, high-spirited cast of 25 brought to life the story of Annie Oakley, a country girl whose sharpshooting skills brought her into vaudeville and to worldwide fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edwin O. Guthman and Edwin O. Guthman,Special to the Sun | March 5, 2000
"American By Blood," by Andrew Huebner. Simon and Schuster. 245 pages. $23. The sun is already turning hot on the morning of July 26, 1876, when three U.S. Army scouts come in view of a hill overlooking the Little Big Horn River in Dakota Territory and discover the sickening, bloody remains of Lt. Col. George Custer, his 7th Cavalry troopers and their horses as wild dogs feed on the bodies and black crows hover overhead. With that grim scene Andrew Huebner begins his first novel. It unfolds with a moving, detailed, descriptive account of the Army's reaction to Custer's defeat, its pursuit of the Sioux, led by their now legendary chiefs, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, and the Army's vengeful attacks as well on other tribes -- the Cheyennes and the Nez Perce.
SPORTS
By Mark Heisler and Mark Heisler,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 31, 1997
CHICAGO -- OK, Bulls fans, how's this for your old nightmare scenario?G -- Randy Brown.G -- Ron Harper.F -- Jason Caffey.F -- Scott Burrell.C -- Luc Longley.It wasn't just a bad dream, either. That was the starting lineup for last week's exhibition at the United Center against Philadelphia. In no particular upset, the visitors won.The 76ers won 22 of 82 games last season, which is one measure of how this preseason went for the last great dynasty of the 20th century."Next year's team?" Bulls guard Steve Kerr was asked.
FEATURES
By Patrick T. Reardon and Patrick T. Reardon,Chicago Tribune | July 12, 1993
Sitting Bull was a great man whose tragedy it was to achieve greatness at the moment of his civilization's death.In any era, he would have been a leader. He was born with a rugged body, a deep mind and an acute sensitivity to the world of the spirit. He grew into a warrior of bravery and a mystic dream-seer, a man wise in his knowledge and in his understanding of his Sioux people.His times, however, were unique. Whites, armed with superior weapons and a deadly efficient approach to war, were invading the western plains, chasing out and killing the buffalo and squeezing the nomadic Sioux onto ever-smaller reservations, finally demanding that the Native Americans give up the hunt and become farmers.
SPORTS
By Michael Madden and Michael Madden,Boston Globe | June 16, 1992
CHICAGO -- Michael had a cigar in his mouth. Perfect. He was blowing cigar smoke in this face and that action-cam, as happy as any youngster, his head spinning like a top, trying to blow smoke on everybody, just riding the wave of joy. Remember Larry and Kevin a decade ago in Houston? Different cigar, but same look. Perfect."MICHAEL!" a chubby man shouted. "Mexico wants you. Mexican TV wants to hear what you say. Mexico, Michael. MEXICO!"It was a mob in Chicago Stadium. Every video-cam of every Chicago station already had had him, networks, too, and now Michael was trying to get back to his dressing room.
SPORTS
May 13, 1992
There was a surprise arrival this week at Pimlico -- at least to Bill Donovan, the Maryland trainer of Preakness probable Dash for Dotty.Donovan was called to the stable gate."
SPORTS
By Michael Madden and Michael Madden,Boston Globe | June 16, 1992
CHICAGO -- Michael had a cigar in his mouth. Perfect. He was blowing cigar smoke in this face and that action-cam, as happy as any youngster, his head spinning like a top, trying to blow smoke on everybody, just riding the wave of joy. Remember Larry and Kevin a decade ago in Houston? Different cigar, but same look. Perfect."MICHAEL!" a chubby man shouted. "Mexico wants you. Mexican TV wants to hear what you say. Mexico, Michael. MEXICO!"It was a mob in Chicago Stadium. Every video-cam of every Chicago station already had had him, networks, too, and now Michael was trying to get back to his dressing room.
NEWS
November 15, 2005
William B. Bryant, 94, the first African-American to serve as chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, died Sunday in Washington. Friday, President Bush signed legislation to name a new $110 million, nine-courtroom addition to the federal courthouse in Judge Bryant's honor - a measure introduced by Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District's delegate to the House of Representatives, along with legislation to name a federal building in Detroit for Rosa Parks. Judge Bryant, who continued hearing cases as a senior judge until recently, was nominated to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1965 after distinguishing himself in private practice and as a federal prosecutor in Washington.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 25, 1991
Holly Pasciullo makes a perky Annie Oakley in the Cockpit in the Court production of ''Annie Get Your Gun.'' Actually, everything about the show is perky, thanks to a very capable cast and the more than capable direction of Todd Pearthree, who also did the choreography.The dancing is rather elaborate for the Cockpit in the Court, but Pearthree manages very well with an accomplished group of young men and women.''Annie Get Your Gun'' was first presented in New York in 1946, where it ran for 1,147 performances.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 25, 1991
Irving Berlin's "Annie Get Your Gun" is about as politically incorrect as you can get these days. Not only does the script, by Herbert and Dorothy Fields, provide a retrograde, ugga-wugga-style picture of American Indians, but the heroine, Annie Oakley, only gets her man when she pretends to be less competent than he is.Cockpit in Court's production doesn't do anything to tone down these political gaffes. To the contrary, Todd Pearthree, who directed and choreographed the show, seems to go overboard exaggerating them; the dance numbers featuring bare-midriffed squaws look like parodies, at best.
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