Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSitcom
IN THE NEWS

Sitcom

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Zurawik and Yvonne Villarreal | November 22, 2011
Jason Winer was directing Julie Bowen on first episode of "Modern Family" when inspiration struck. "In the initial draft, Julie's character was described as mildly controlling and neurotic," Winer says of the suburban sitcom mom. "But what she didn't have in that draft was this idea that she was formerly a bad girl who had kind of reformed herself. " Winer thought the extra history could add an important dimension to Bowen's Claire Dunphy — and make a difference to the story featuring her teenage daughter, Haley, who just starting dating.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 24, 2014
Ward and June. Ozzie and Harriet. Jim and Margaret Anderson. If you recognize those couples - and if you grew up wishing they were your parents - you likely hearken to a time when the American family was made up of a breadwinning father and a homemaking mother and a couple of kids. We like to think of the 1950s and the early 1960s as the golden age of family life, but it was also a repressive time for women. Only a handful had college degrees, only about 30 percent ventured outside the home to work, and women had little control over the timing and number of the children they bore.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,Cox News Service | September 12, 1993
It's not like Geneva Holloway is an enormous star, some sort of paragon of the dramatic art. Her latest vehicle, a TV movie remake of "The Philadelphia Story" titled "It Happened in Philadelphia," was greeted by critics with undiluted venom: "I'm opposed to capital punishment but 'It Happened in Philadelphia' has turned me around," read one notice. "Ms. Holloway, like Lee Harvey Oswald, acted alone," was another. Someone who's studied acting with Darryl Hickman deserves gentler treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
It's sponsored by Audi and its intended to promote the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards telecast on Monday. But forget all that for a moment, and just watch these three superb performers take off with this satirical reality-TV premise and totally romp. Cranston's too good to believe.   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; }
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 19, 1997
Remember Lucy and William Holden? How about Lucy and John Wayne?Tonight, it's Ellen and Emma Thompson in ABC's "Ellen" (9: 30 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2), and it is every bit the classic half-hour of sitcom madness as any episode of "I Love Lucy." In fact -- risking the wrath of legions of Lucy fans (Lucites?) -- I think tonight's "Ellen" is better than those rightfully cherished episodes from the 1950s.The reason it's better: Thompson. While big-name guest stars from the world of film mainly stood there looking 10 times larger than life on the sitcom screen while Lucy ricocheted off them like a butterfly on LSD, Thompson hits the stage running in the opening sequence and never stops until the final frame.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 10, 1994
There will be more stand-up comics, new ethnic sitcoms and a family movie night come next fall on ABC, as the second-place network focuses itself on the 18-to-49-year-old audience.The changes ABC made yesterday in announcing its fall schedule were not huge. Only four new hours of programming were added. The only noteworthy cancellation was that of "Phenom," a Tuesday-night sitcom about a teen tennis star, which regularly finished in Nielsen's top 25.But ABC's direction is clear. The network wants more of what Brett Butler and Ellen DeGeneres brought this year with their sitcoms.
FEATURES
By SCOTT COLLINS and SCOTT COLLINS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- Ashton Kutcher has apparently gotten the last laugh on skeptics who might dub his marriage to Demi Moore a farce. He's turned their love into a sitcom. The latest celebrity to spin his backstage life into a TV script, the former That '70s Show star has sold Fox an idea for a comedy series called 30-Year-Old Grandpa, executives say. It's about the complications that ensue when a young man becomes the stepfather to a brood of kids remarkably close to his own age, according to the trade paper Variety.
FEATURES
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,Newsday | September 19, 2007
It sure is fun to see two sitcom pros strutting their stuff on-screen. If only the same could be said of their behind-the-camera colleagues. Thus are Kelsey Grammer and Patricia Heaton left high and dry in Fox's much-anticipated, new live-audience comedy Back to You. As warring Pittsburgh news anchors with a past - a tiresome, predictable past - the Emmy winners from Frasier and Everybody Loves Raymond can still snap off a line like nobody's business....
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 5, 1992
Television, which brought us the sitcom and the "infomercial," is now bringing us the "sitcommercial."This weekend in Baltimore, Bell Atlantic Corp. will launch the first episode of "The Ringers," a family comedy series with all the trappings of a traditional situation comedy -- including a laugh track and a crew of wacky but lovable characters.The difference is that this sitcom is a 30-minute ad for phone company services like Call Waiting and Caller ID. The comic situations here are built around the family's use of the telephone.
FEATURES
By Lynn Smith and Lynn Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2004
A few weeks ago, sitcom writer Mitchell Hurwitz had a brief Sally Field moment. His offbeat freshman show Arrested Development was nominated for seven Emmys, including best comedy, on the heels of taking top honors from the Television Critics Association. He said his first happy thoughts ("Wow. They really like us.") were followed by mild panic ("What do you think they like? What should we do now?"). Despite the show's success with critics, Arrested Development remains Fox's lowest-rated comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Robin Williams was one of the most original, daring and troubled comedians to ever work in television. When he first burst on the screen, you held your breath as you watched him dance out there on a manic tightrope of improvisation. But after a while, you stopped wondering how he did it and learned to just enjoy the high of seeing him soar. The 63-year-old comedian and actor was found dead Monday at his home in Tiburon, Calif., north of San Francisco. The cause of death is suspected to be suicide by asphyxiation, according to the Marin County coroner's office.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Whatever else can be said about "Sean Saves the World," the Sean Hayes vehicle which premieres Thursday night on NBC, know that the sitcom doesn't treat sexuality with kid gloves. Take the explanation divorced gay dad Sean (played by out "Will & Grace" vet Hayes) gives his teenage daughter Ellie (Samantha Isler) when she asks -- in a convenient piece of pilot episode exposition -- how she came to be conceived. "Gay," Hayes says matter of factly. "Tried not to be. Was. Was again. Was one more time, because it was not unpleasant.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
If the pilot of cop show "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is any indication, police captain Ray Holt is well on his way to joining the pantheon of well-realized LGBT characters on network TV. It's not that Holt ( portrayed by "Homicide" alum Andre Braugher ) is particularly central to the new Fox sitcom. That honor rests with Andy Samberg, who plays immature-but-brilliant Brooklyn detective Jake Peralta. "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is built around the actor's well-proven hyperactive humor, albeit a little more restrained.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
As the new network season arrives this week, a couple of old familiar Baltimore faces have caught my eye: Andre Braugher and Wendell Pierce. Happily, they are in two of the more promising series in an otherwise mostly lackluster field: “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” (Fox) and “The Michael J. Fox Show” (NBC). Neither is the headliner. “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” a sitcom set in a police precinct, stars Andy Samberg as Jake Peralta, a brilliant but impulsive young detective. “The Michael J. Fox Show” is a family comedy starring Fox as a New York anchorman who returns to the airwaves five years after retiring in the wake of being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
As the television networks announced their fall schedules during this week's upfronts, news was pretty mixed for TV's LGBT characters. The good news first: Former "Will & Grace" star Sean Hayes is returning to NBC with a new sitcom bound to touch on gay issues. In "Sean Saves the World," the openly gay Hayes stars as a divorced gay dad raising a teenage daughter (Sami Isler) with the aid of his overbearing mother (Linda Lavin). Judging by the trailer , the show will tread on conventional multi-camera sitcom ground, especially with that pushy laugh track.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
On Wednesday, HBO renewed the Baltimore-made sitcom "VEEP" for a third season. That means the series, which stars Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer, will be producing another 10 episodes in the Baltimore area next year. That's good news for the local economy. During its first season, which consisted of eight episodes, "VEEP" hired 978 Marylanders for cast and crew and did business with more than 1,100 Maryland vendors, according to the Maryland Film Office. Here's the release from the premium cable channel: HBO has renewed the comedy series VEEP for a ten-episode third season, scheduled for 2014.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 4, 2005
From Roseanne's ill-fated attempt last summer, to Kirstie Alley and Farrah Fawcett trying this spring, there has been no shortage of programs dealing with older actresses, show biz comeback attempts and the ubiquitous role of reality TV in chronicling how unpleasant things can get. Based on ratings, it is fair to say none has managed to hold the public's interest. So, why should anyone care about The Comeback, a new HBO series about a 40-year-old actress trying to hang on in the Hollywood jungle of network television a decade past her last successful run in prime time?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 9, 2003
The very first image viewers of the new NBC sitcom Whoopi will see tonight is that of Mavis Rae (Whoopi Goldberg) lighting a cigarette and taking a drag as she stands behind the front desk of the small Manhattan Hotel she owns. A guest standing nearby picks up a no-smoking sign and says, "Excuse me." "Oh, you're right, sir. I'm sorry. Here, I'll just put it out," she says meekly, moving her hand toward an ash tray. But as soon as the guest turns his back and starts to walk away, she puts the cigarette back in her mouth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
"Deep" and "sitcom" are not words often used in the same sentence. But a visit to the "VEEP" soundstage in Columbia gave a glimpse of the larger cultural power of this savvy satire from HBO, returning for its second season Sunday night. I also came away dazzled by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who last year won an Emmy as best comedic actress for her portrayal of Vice President Selina Meyer. "VEEP" drills as far down into the state of the national psyche as any TV comedy has in the past 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Baltimore native Jason Winer knows something about family comedy. He's been an executive producer on ABC's "Modern Family" and won a Directors Guild Award for his direction of the hit series' Emmy Award-winning pilot. This week, "1600 Penn," a family sitcom about a fictional first family that he co-created, joins NBC's Thursday night lineup. (A sneak preview of the pilot aired in December.) On Wednesday, Winer and the cast will be guests at the real White House where the series will be screened for President Obama.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.