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By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
While sitting in her anatomy class at Georgetown, Tori Manger received the text she had been waiting for. The 25-year-old graduate student had qualified for the Washington International Horse Show, a top indoor equestrian event that accepts just 30 horses and riders out of hundreds vying for a spot in the Adult Amateur Jumper Championship. Alex Volta, who gave her the news, was just as excited. It meant another chance to compete together on a national stage as best friends, training partners and, most importantly, as sisters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Aberdeen junior Stephanie Jones already had a connection to Maryland's women's basketball team when she started to get serious about the recruiting process. She knew how much her sister, Brionna, loved her experience last winter as a Terps freshman, but Stephanie did her homework before deciding she wanted to be a Terp, too. She cut a long list of top-notch schools to Maryland, Duke, Louisville and Notre Dame, and Wednesday, the versatile 6-foot-2 forward-guard made a verbal commitment to Maryland coach Brenda Frese, who had first seen her play as a fifth grader.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Sister Margaret Eugene Beall, a retired educator who was a member for more than six decades of the Sisters of St. Francis, died Monday of heart failure at Assisi House, her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 90. Mildred Beall was born and raised in Baltimore, where she graduated in 1941 from Eastern High School. Before entering the Sisters of St. Francis in 1945, she worked at International Printing Ink in Baltimore. She professed her vows in 1948 and earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 from Marywood College in Scranton, Pa. She earned a master's degree in educational administration in 1961 from St. Bonaventure University in Bonaventure, N.Y. From 1947 to 1950, she was on the faculty of St. Benedict School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Did someone say free cupcakes? Free FAMOUS cupcakes? The women behind TLC's show "DC Cupcakes" will be in Baltimore tonight, signing copies of their new book and, yes, giving out samples of the treats they've made a name on. It will be all of the baked goods, but none of the drama. Or so we're assuming. Katherine Kallinis Berman and Sophie Kallinis LaMontagne will be showing off their book "Sweet Celebrations" from 7:15 to 9 p.m. tonight at Costas Inn, 4100 Northpoint Blvd.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Sister Mary Magdala Thompson, a Sister of Mercy who was a noted educator, psychotherapist and author, died July 14 of heart failure at Providence Hospital in Mobile, Ala. The former Baltimore resident was 89. "There was a common thread in all of the various ministries that she took up during her lifetime, and that was a genuine interest in people and the love and value of each person as an individual," said Sister Helen Amos, former president and...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Sister Marie Immaculate Fay, who taught in Baltimore parochial schools, died of cardiopulmonary collapse March 22 at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 82. Born Margaret Mary Fay in Dublin, Ireland, she attended public schools in Harrisburg, Pa. She entered the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1951 and professed her first vows in 1953. She earned a bachelor of arts in history at Neumann University in Aston. She began teaching at St. Anthony's School in Gardenville in 1952 and later served at the Shrine of the Little Flower in Belair-Edison, St. Catherine of Siena in East Baltimore and Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Essex.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 6, 2011
Sister Mary Lucy Yingling, a member of the Sisters of Mercy whose career as an educator spanned nearly 50 years, died March 31 of complications from Parkinson's disease at The Villa, an assisted-living facility in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County that her order shares with the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart. Sister Mary Lucy was 87. The daughter of a postal worker and a homemaker, she was born Katherine Teresa Yingling, the fifth of nine children, in Washington and raised in Georgetown.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
Sister John Marie Stack, a member of the Sisters of St. Francis and a registered nurse who had been a director of nursing services and a chaplain, died Feb. 24 of cancer at Assisi House, her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 81. Marguerite Mary Stack was born in Brighton, Mass., and raised in Revere, Mass., where she graduated from Immaculate Conception High School. She entered the Sisters of St. Francis in 1947 and professed her vows in 1950. She was a 1953 graduate of Baltimore's St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing, which was located on Caroline Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 15, 2011
Sister Mary Ferdinand Tunis, a Sister of Mercy who taught parochial school mathematics before establishing the Sisters of Mercy Windsor Hills Project in the early 1970s, died June 7 of pneumonia at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 91 and had lived for the past 15 years at The Villa, a retirement community that her order shares with the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. Jane Hansel Tunis was born in Baltimore and raised in the 4500 block of Prospect Circle in Windsor Hills, the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood that would come to play a major role in her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
"I don't know, sister, what I'm saying, nor do no man, if he don't be praying. I know that love is the only answer and the tight-rope lover the only dancer. … - From the poem " Some Days (for Paula)" by James Baldwin The tightrope lover was 40 years old in 1983 when Baldwin published a book containing this prescient verse. The author hoped that "Some Days" would help his younger sister steady her nerves and find her footing as she inched along the thin path to safety.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Under increasing legal and political pressure, the Obama administration issued a new rule Friday designed to ensure that female employees have access to birth control while accommodating religious employers that object to covering it through their health insurance plans. But the latest attempt at a compromise — which comes in response to recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions — was quickly criticized by religious groups, including the Catonsville-based Little Sisters of the Poor, for not fully addressing their concerns.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
Aug. 15 was the feast day of the Assumption of the Blessed Mother, full of grace. I want to share my story of another woman who was full of grace, Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik. I was 14 in 1965 when I entered high school at Archbishop Keough School in Baltimore. I was painfully shy - my family had moved to Catonsville in August of that year - and I went from a class of about 30 at Blessed Sacrament School on York Road to a class of over 300 young girls. I knew no one. It was a very painful time in my life, but God sends grace, and I found it in Sister Catherine's English class.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
This week in 'Crime Scene,' former TV police reporter and Baltimore City Police spokesman Matt Jablow brings you a case that has gone unsolved for nearly 45 years. In November 1969, a 26-year-old nun, Catherine Cesnik, disappeared after leaving her Southwest Baltimore apartment to go shopping. Two months later, her beaten body was found in a frozen field in Baltimore County. No suspect was named in the original investigation, but in 1994, sensational allegations arose that re-opened the case.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Forget what you think you know about a mule being an obstinate creature, given to sitting down with a frustrated rider on its back if the impulse strikes. Madison and Miranda Iager of Woodbine say they will be working to debunk the "stubborn as a mule" myth when they compete Thursday on Gato and Misdemeanor at the Howard County Fair in the Maryland High School Rodeo Association's first appearance since forming in November. "Gato is super funny, always trying to make you laugh," said Madison, 15. "And he's very, very personable.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Yesterday, in the wake of the second murder of a transgender woman in Baltimore in the last two months , Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts held a press conference to convey a commitment to solving the crime and improving police relations with the transgender community. Los Angeles Clippers shooting guard Reggie Bullock also started tweeting about 26-year-old Mia Henderson's death, saying she was his "brother," and the case -- which city police had clearly sought to shine a spotlight on -- became the subject of international news.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Sister Mary Mark Walsh, a retired teacher who was a member of the Sisters of Mercy for nearly 78 years, died of heart failure Saturday at the Villa, her order's Baltimore County retirement home. She was 97. Born Ruth Anna Walsh in Baltimore County, she was the daughter of Charles S. Walsh, a farmer, and Minnie Woolrey Walsh, a homemaker. According to a biography supplied by the Sisters of Mercy, she grew up on the family farm near the Liberty Dam. There were no Catholic schools in immediate area and she received her early religious training from the Jesuit fathers at the old Woodstock College.
NEWS
July 13, 2014
Regarding the recent rant by small business woman and political activist Michelle Jefferson ( "Stop griping and get a grip, ladies," July 11), it seems that she missed the most basic and fundamental message of the women's movement in the last century: don't leave your sisters behind. Born in 1949, I too had the privilege of experiencing, participating in and benefiting from the great cultural phenomenon known as "The Women's Movement. " From the beginning we understood that all women - academics and housewives, bright and average, privileged and disadvantaged - deserve equal treatment in our world, and in some cases, assistance from those of us who could help others to achieve this.
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