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Sister Souljah

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NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | June 20, 1992
I started the week thinking the ''Sister Souljah'' flap started by Bill Clinton was a non-issue. Now, after a week of having white pundits speak for me, I am not so sure.There is no question that Sister Souljah is a bright young woman. The way she handled the press conference called to rebut the Arkansas governor's attack proved it.Mr. Clinton took out of context remarks the young rapper uttered while trying to explain the attitudes of the black gang members who had just razed to the ground whole sections of Los Angeles.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 6, 2012
This is shaping up to be the second election in a row that's about someone who isn't on the ballot: George W. Bush. In 2008, Barack Obama won in no small part by turning the election into a referendum on President Bush and by claiming that a John McCain presidency would amount to a third Bush term. Since then, Mr. Obama's presidency has been one long run-on sentence of blaming his predecessor, only occasionally punctuated with complaints about Europe, ATMs, the GOP Congress, Fox News and tsunamis.
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NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 31, 1992
Does anyone remember the spate of angry columns that appeared last summer denouncing Bill Clinton for criticizing Sister Souljah -- and, by implication, Jesse Jackson, who had invited her to speak at his Rainbow Coalition convention?The writers said Mr. Clinton's criticism of Ms. Souljah's remarks after the Los Angeles riots -- she suggested black people ought to kill white people instead of each other -- was actually a coded racial appeal to white Reagan Democrats. Some writers went on to express the hope that black voters would punish Mr. Clinton by staying away from the polls in November.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 31, 2012
Now that Mitt Romney has corralled enough delegates to the Republican National Convention to assure his presidential nomination, political wisdom might suggest that he end his conspicuous romancing of his party's right wing and start reaching out to the rest of the electorate. He was handed a golden opportunity to do so the other day at a major fundraising event also attended by his celebrity backer Donald Trump. The loquacious developer/television star not surprisingly repeated his suspicions that Barack Obama was not born on American soil and hence was not qualified to run for president in 2008.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | July 11, 1992
So many people wrote about Sister Souljah and Bill Clinton, on and off the record, that the issue merits revisiting.Tom R. Kovach, of Nevis, Minn., wrote that ''people in the black community, especially black leaders like Jesse Jackson, after years of whining and blaming everything that is wrong in their community, are now anxious to push this nation into a race war.''Interesting point, Mr. Nevis, but I can't see how you got there. Black Americans since Reconstruction have complained about the flouting of their rights as citizens, job discrimination, lack of access to education, housing and medical care.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
HOUSTON -- Jesse Jackson renewed his biting assault on Bill Clinton here yesterday, accusing the Democratic presidential candidate of attacking him on the Sister Souljah question 10 days ago as part of a "political calculation."The rebuke was stiff enough to be a warning sign to Mr. Clinton that he may have an extremely tricky political situation to resolve in the less than three weeks before the party's national convention in New York.Only minutes after praising Mr. Clinton's economic plan before the annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, Mr. Jackson pointedly avoided endorsing the Arkansas governor and accused him of following a strategy of "distancing" himself from Mr. Jackson's Rainbow Coalition to seek the votes of conservative whites.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | June 18, 1992
Here's the bottom line on the flap at the Rainbow Coalition's convention last weekend: Bill Clinton was mostly right, but not entirely.Jesse Jackson was mostly wrong, but not egregiously so.And Sister Souljah may have made one or two good points, but most of her remarks were so silly and misinformed that anything good she may have said was rendered entirely irrelevant.Confused?Good! You're supposed to be confused, because the real problem here is that we keep asking the wrong people the wrong questions at the wrong time.
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin Roger Catlin is the music critic for the Hartford Courant. and Roger Catlin Roger Catlin is the music critic for the Hartford Courant.,The Hartford Courant | June 19, 1992
If it wasn't already a wacky enough presidential election year, the latest campaign controversy comes from an obscure rapper.It'd be one thing if the candidates quoted relevant rap statements from Chuck D. of Public Enemy, KRS-One of Boogie Down Productions or even the incendiary remarks of Ice Cube or Ice-T.But Democratic candidate Bill Clinton made headlines by publicly rebuking Sister Souljah, a marginal name in rap, who had been quoted as saying "If black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people?"
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,The Hartford Courant | June 19, 1992
If it wasn't already a wacky enough presidential election year, the latest campaign controversy comes from an obscure rapper.It'd be one thing if the candidates quoted relevant rap statements from Chuck D. of Public Enemy, KRS-One of Boogie Down Productions or even the incendiary remarks of Ice Cube or Ice-T.But Democratic candidate Bill Clinton made headlines by publicly rebuking Sister Souljah, a marginal name in rap, who had been quoted as saying "If black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people?"
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Sister Souljah is tired. Very tired.She has spent seven hours on the New Jersey Turnpike, creeping along at 35 miles an hour because of the falling snow. Then there were a couple of morning radio interviews. By noon she is ready for a nap.But there is another interview.This one is held in the lobby of the Jefferson Hotel in Washington. The Jefferson does not seem like a Souljah hangout. Tapes of classical and late Baroque string ensembles play softly in the background. The gas-fed fire is warm, inviting.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
IT WAS JUST days before Christmas, and 16-year-old Keah Moore hadn't the faintest notion of what gift to get for her mom. It's not that Keah, a junior who recently transferred to Woodlawn High School from the private New Mark of Excellence Academy, is a last-minute shopper. She's more like an almost-the-last-minute shopper. "She was out last night buying presents," Dolly Moore said Monday night of her eldest daughter. Better, perhaps, to go on a gift hunt with three shopping days remaining until Christmas than on Christmas Eve. So Keah headed to the malls and shopped for friends, her kid sister, godparents and their children, but was still at a loss about what to get for her own mom. What was she to do?
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Sister Souljah is tired. Very tired.She has spent seven hours on the New Jersey Turnpike, creeping along at 35 miles an hour because of the falling snow. Then there were a couple of morning radio interviews. By noon she is ready for a nap.But there is another interview.This one is held in the lobby of the Jefferson Hotel in Washington. The Jefferson does not seem like a Souljah hangout. Tapes of classical and late Baroque string ensembles play softly in the background. The gas-fed fire is warm, inviting.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | June 7, 1995
THE FALLOUT from the great Bob Dole confrontation with Hollywood has been fascinating. One might have thought that raising moral objections to music that celebrates the disgusting, the unspeakably vulgar and the violent would be a no-brainer for all men of goodwill.But apparently it isn't. The smart set has rushed to the defense of 2 Live Crew, Nine Inch Nails and the rest, and has been particularly solicitous about those poor, defenseless executives of multibillion-dollar Time Warner.In the wake of Mr. Dole's speech (a beautifully crafted, subtle speech, incidentally)
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
July 18, 1993
Sun political columnists Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover have written their fourth book on a presidential campaign. This is the second of three excerpts from "Mad As Hell: Revolt at the Ballot Box, 1992," which was released last week. The first, printed in yesterday's Sun, was on the crucial second presidential debate. Today: Bill Clinton's decision on what to do about the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson. Tomorrow: The people speak up.On the advice of Hollywood television situation comedy producers Harry Thomason and his wife, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, and others on the staff, Bill Clinton found that one way to get beyond the news media's focus on process questions was to work the television talk show circuit.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 31, 1992
Does anyone remember the spate of angry columns that appeared last summer denouncing Bill Clinton for criticizing Sister Souljah -- and, by implication, Jesse Jackson, who had invited her to speak at his Rainbow Coalition convention?The writers said Mr. Clinton's criticism of Ms. Souljah's remarks after the Los Angeles riots -- she suggested black people ought to kill white people instead of each other -- was actually a coded racial appeal to white Reagan Democrats. Some writers went on to express the hope that black voters would punish Mr. Clinton by staying away from the polls in November.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 21, 1992
Tsk, tsk. There goes Bill Clinton, breaking the rules of''notsaposta'' again.''Notsapostas'' are the political taboos too many Democrats live by, according to Rep. Barney Frank, a liberal Massachusetts Democrat.In his book, ''Speaking Frankly: What's Wrong With the Democrats and How To Fix It,'' Mr. Frank defines a ''notsaposta'' as a truth so troubling that members of a political party cannot acknowledge it without suffering a backlash from fellow party members for giving aid and comfort to their enemies.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Last week it was racist rap. This week it is dirty tricks. Ar Gennifer Flowers and Murphy Brown to be consigned so quickly to history's ash heaps? Is Sister Souljah also to be a passing fancy, pushed off the front page by Inspector Perot, the super sleuth pursuing and being pursued by Hitlerian propagandists at the Republican National Committee?Let it be said right off that the bizarre 1992 presidential campaign is not without its uses. It enriched Ms. Flowers, increased the ratings of the Murphy Brown TV show and undoubtedly will boost sales of Sister Souljah's records.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau Chief | July 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- He's put on weight since the last time most Americans were watching, and he's still hoarse-throated and baggy-eyed. But Bill Clinton is in remarkably good political shape as he steps back into the spotlight.On the eve of his party's national convention here, the Democratic nominee-to-be finds himself squarely in the midst of a three-way dead heat for the presidency."Under the circumstances, after all I've been through, to be in what is a functional three-way dead heat is not all that bad," Mr. Clinton told Time magazine.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | July 11, 1992
So many people wrote about Sister Souljah and Bill Clinton, on and off the record, that the issue merits revisiting.Tom R. Kovach, of Nevis, Minn., wrote that ''people in the black community, especially black leaders like Jesse Jackson, after years of whining and blaming everything that is wrong in their community, are now anxious to push this nation into a race war.''Interesting point, Mr. Nevis, but I can't see how you got there. Black Americans since Reconstruction have complained about the flouting of their rights as citizens, job discrimination, lack of access to education, housing and medical care.
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