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By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Days after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast region, students at McDonogh School emptied more than $1,000 in change from their pockets into a bucket. Last week, they raised money by selling light-up buttons depicting the school mascot. Next Monday, lower-school children will start collecting coins in water cooler jugs. Kids and adults all over the world have contributed money and resources to help storm victims. But the students at McDonogh, by raising money for a school outside New Orleans, are also bringing together for the first time two institutions with a common heritage.
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msaarbach1@gmail.com | February 28, 2013
The month of February saw a wide variety of events being held on the campus of St. Vincent's Villa. The children at St. Vincent's were treated to a wonderful concert early in the month by the Pizzazz group of high school students who wish to share their musical gifts with others. The children sang along with many of the songs, showing their enjoyment of this special event. For the President's Day holiday, high school basketball teams from Mt. St. Joe's and Our Lady of Mt. Carmel came out to run a mini-basketball clinic with the children as part of a day of service organized by Catholic Charities.
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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
They live in the United States, but seventh-graders at Wilde Lake Middle School soon will get a glimpse of what it's like to be a student in a Third World country: Nicaragua.Later this month, the Columbia school becomes the first in Maryland to take part in a sister school program sponsored by Libros para Ninos, a nonprofit organization that raises education funds for first- through sixth-graders in Nicaragua.Mary Jo Amani, founder and executive director for Libros para Ninos, will discuss the partnership in a visit to the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center at 7:30 p.m. tonight.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Days after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast region, students at McDonogh School emptied more than $1,000 in change from their pockets into a bucket. Last week, they raised money by selling light-up buttons depicting the school mascot. Next Monday, lower-school children will start collecting coins in water cooler jugs. Kids and adults all over the world have contributed money and resources to help storm victims. But the students at McDonogh, by raising money for a school outside New Orleans, are also bringing together for the first time two institutions with a common heritage.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 1997
WORTHINGTON Elementary School has created a "Read-to-Feed" program -- a voluntary reading-incentive program that helps feed hungry Marylanders while encouraging students to read.Here's how it works:Students obtain pledges of nonperishable food items for each book they read.At the end of the program, the school collects the donations and presents them to the Maryland Food Bank.This is the program's fifth year.At an assembly on Jan. 3, Daisy the Clown and a spokesman from the Maryland Food Bank explained the system to the children.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 17, 1999
Normally, entering the bright, clean gym would mean talking, gossiping and giggling, but yesterday, the hundreds of girls in short, mint-green skirts, scuffed Doc Marten oxfords and white polo shirts shuffled silently into the athletic center single file, for a different kind of assembly.Former and current faculty, students and members of the Board of Trustee gathered on the sprawling campus yesterday for the St. Paul's School for Girls' 40th birthday in Brooklandville. More than 400 people listened to the school's choir and heard three former headmistresses reminisce about their tenures at the private Episcopal school.
NEWS
msaarbach1@gmail.com | February 28, 2013
The month of February saw a wide variety of events being held on the campus of St. Vincent's Villa. The children at St. Vincent's were treated to a wonderful concert early in the month by the Pizzazz group of high school students who wish to share their musical gifts with others. The children sang along with many of the songs, showing their enjoyment of this special event. For the President's Day holiday, high school basketball teams from Mt. St. Joe's and Our Lady of Mt. Carmel came out to run a mini-basketball clinic with the children as part of a day of service organized by Catholic Charities.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2005
Brandon Bettencourtt was supposed to be a freshman at Loyola University New Orleans. He was supposed to be taking business courses. He was supposed to have his own clothes. But yesterday, Bettencourtt was walking around the campus of Baltimore's Loyola College, on his way to a philosophy class, wearing a Magic Johnson basketball jersey that belongs to a friend. As he twirled a few strands of gray that run through his long black hair, Bettencourtt, 18, smiled ruefully. "Before Katrina, the gray was shorter," he said.
NEWS
By Dilshad D. Husain and Dilshad D. Husain,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 27, 1997
Ai Okazaki extended her arms away from her body to indicate the large stomach of a sumo wrestler, then she wrinkled her face. The students in Candee Brodsky's Spanish class at Atholton High School in Howard County burst into laughter, along with Ai and her two Japanese friends."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Lem Satterfield and Andrew A. Green and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2001
Three students at St. Paul's School for Boys were suspended indefinitely yesterday, lacrosse practices and games were canceled and teachers were lecturing students about morality in response to a sex scandal this week at the private Brooklandville school. Administrators have interviewed two dozen students, and school officials confirmed yesterday that a player on the junior varsity boys' lacrosse team had videotaped himself and a girl from another private school having sex and showed the tape to other members of the team.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2005
Brandon Bettencourtt was supposed to be a freshman at Loyola University New Orleans. He was supposed to be taking business courses. He was supposed to have his own clothes. But yesterday, Bettencourtt was walking around the campus of Baltimore's Loyola College, on his way to a philosophy class, wearing a Magic Johnson basketball jersey that belongs to a friend. As he twirled a few strands of gray that run through his long black hair, Bettencourtt, 18, smiled ruefully. "Before Katrina, the gray was shorter," he said.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 17, 1999
Normally, entering the bright, clean gym would mean talking, gossiping and giggling, but yesterday, the hundreds of girls in short, mint-green skirts, scuffed Doc Marten oxfords and white polo shirts shuffled silently into the athletic center single file, for a different kind of assembly.Former and current faculty, students and members of the Board of Trustee gathered on the sprawling campus yesterday for the St. Paul's School for Girls' 40th birthday in Brooklandville. More than 400 people listened to the school's choir and heard three former headmistresses reminisce about their tenures at the private Episcopal school.
NEWS
By Dilshad D. Husain and Dilshad D. Husain,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 27, 1997
Ai Okazaki extended her arms away from her body to indicate the large stomach of a sumo wrestler, then she wrinkled her face. The students in Candee Brodsky's Spanish class at Atholton High School in Howard County burst into laughter, along with Ai and her two Japanese friends."
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 1997
WORTHINGTON Elementary School has created a "Read-to-Feed" program -- a voluntary reading-incentive program that helps feed hungry Marylanders while encouraging students to read.Here's how it works:Students obtain pledges of nonperishable food items for each book they read.At the end of the program, the school collects the donations and presents them to the Maryland Food Bank.This is the program's fifth year.At an assembly on Jan. 3, Daisy the Clown and a spokesman from the Maryland Food Bank explained the system to the children.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
They live in the United States, but seventh-graders at Wilde Lake Middle School soon will get a glimpse of what it's like to be a student in a Third World country: Nicaragua.Later this month, the Columbia school becomes the first in Maryland to take part in a sister school program sponsored by Libros para Ninos, a nonprofit organization that raises education funds for first- through sixth-graders in Nicaragua.Mary Jo Amani, founder and executive director for Libros para Ninos, will discuss the partnership in a visit to the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center at 7:30 p.m. tonight.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 22, 2009
St. Margaret School in Bel Air observed the annual International Day of Peace Monday with prayers, songs and the dedication of a "peace pole." More than 500 children in the lower school marched from a prayer service in the gymnasium to the 6-foot-tall pole inscribed on all four sides with "May Peace Prevail on Earth" in four languages - English, Spanish, Korean and Creole, in a nod to their sister school in Haiti. "Prevail means to be strong and persist," said Jimmy Beyer, a fifth-grader.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
For a week next month, Howard County Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin will be visiting schools not in Columbia but in China. As part of a cultural-exchange trip from April 4 through 12, Cousin and school administrator Rick Marquart will be sharing information about Howard County schools, its programs and curriculum while learning about China's education system. Howard school officials want to establish sister-school as well as professional relationships with their counterparts in China.
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