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Sister Maryann

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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 22, 1993
The phones started ringing Friday morning. Something horrible had happened up at the secluded convent behind Memorial Stadium, on Ellerslie Avenue.Word went out from parish to parish. At first people thought one of the very old sisters had been attacked, but soon the name came over the radio.It was Sister MaryAnn Glinka, 50, the great and beloved Sister MaryAnn, the kind of person who gives the human race a good name.She was killed Friday where she labored, caring for the aged and infirm nuns who themselves had led lives of strict Christian charity and good works.
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NEWS
By Patricia A. Rogucki | March 28, 1994
IT IS SAID that the people of El Salvador do not let their dead die. Amid massacres and murders, every family I know has lost at least one loved one in that country's 12-year-old civil car, but the meaning of these lives did not end with death. Strong and vivid memories enabled the living to continue in hope.So it is with my friend, MaryAnn Glinka of the Franciscan Sisters of Baltimore.How well I remember Friday, March 19, 1993! I drove onto Penrose Street to teach a homebound student just as the 1 o'clock news broke the story of the terrible murder at St. Elizabeth's Convent on Ellerslie Avenue.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 25, 1993
It was so obvious, there toward the end of the funeral, that hesitate to mention it for fear of trivializing the symbolism. But everyone in the chapel must have seen what happened.As the bishop and priests at yesterday's Mass for Sister MaryAnn Glinka finished distributing the Eucharist, a wide bar of sunlight poured through a window and painted a wall. By the time everyone assembled outside at the grave, the sun was full in the sky and drying the wet pavement around the Franciscan Sisterhood convent.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | December 14, 1993
A young mother stabbed to death in front of her three children last night at the family's small apartment building in East Baltimore became the city's 335th murder victim, tying last year's record -- and making it inevitable that 1993 will be the city's deadliest ever.The latest victim, who was not immediately identified, was killed shortly before 10 p.m. with what police described as "a miniature samarai sword" in her apartment in the 1500 block of Ward Court.Statistics released this week by police paint a picture of Baltimore's murder climate as being primarily black-on-black crime, with increasing numbers of juveniles being slain by gunfire.
NEWS
By Joseph F. Breighner | March 24, 1993
HOLY places and holy people serve similar purposes.We designate certain places as holy: churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, cathedrals. We do it to discover the holiness of all places. We "limit" God's presence to special places in order to worship God in all places -- the God whom the whole universe in all its fullness could not limit.And we designate certain people as holy. I don't mean that the life of Sister MaryAnn Glinka was more valuable than the lives of all the others who are dying in Baltimore at a rate of more than one a day. In God's eyes, all life is equally precious.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | March 23, 1993
Led by a youth carrying a large wooden crucifix, more than 200 people walked last night to the Northeast Baltimore convent where Sister MaryAnn Glinka was murdered and prayed for the world's sinners and unfortunates."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
A priest is not supposed to blame or judge, even in anger, even when a nun has been strangled.That, said Monsignor John J. Duggan, would be a sin.The monsignor stepped lightly near the margins of sin yesterday from the pulpit of St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church as he eulogized Sister MaryAnn Glinka, the nun killed Friday morning in her Northeast Baltimore convent.The tribute was only one of many being made throughout Maryland this weekend."Sister went down to the convent to prepare breakfast for the nuns, and she met her death," said Monsignor Duggan, speaking to some 30 worshipers at a noon Mass downtown.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Michael James and Eric Siegel and Michael James,Staff Writers Staff writer Melody Simmons contributed to this article | March 20, 1993
A 50-year-old nun was found bound, gagged and murdered yesterday morning inside her Northeast Baltimore convent, a crime that shocked a city already experiencing almost a murder a day.At dawn, another nun found the body of Sister MaryAnn Glinka, dressed in night clothes, inside the front entryway of the Franciscan Sisters of Baltimore Motherhouse Community at 3725 Ellerslie Ave. north of Memorial Stadium.Police were looking late last night for a suspect, Melvin L. Jones, 34, whose last known address was the 1600 block of E. 32nd St. Mr. Jones, also known as Michael Brown, was charged in a warrant with first-degree murder and burglary.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
Sister MaryAnn Glinka's brother testified in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday that a wristwatch recovered from suspect Melvin Jones had belonged to the slain Franciscan nun.Ernest J. Glinka's testimony came on the second day of Mr. Jones' trial as prosecutors continued to try to link the defendant to Sister MaryAnn and the Franciscan order's North Baltimore convent."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 9, 1993
Sister MaryAnn Glinka's duties at the Franciscan nun's convent in Baltimore included monitoring the motherhouse's security system. Early on March 19, hearing the alarm triggered once again by the damaged door to the convent's library, she called the security agency to report a false alarm.Minutes later, on her way to check on the door, she was strangled and raped.Prosecutors gave that account of the final moments of the 50-year-old nun's life yesterday during the first day of the trial of her accused killer, Melvin L. Jones, who is charged with first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 19, 1993
Melvin Lorenzo Jones was spared the death penalty yesterday and sentenced to life without parole for murdering and sexually assaulting Sister MaryAnn Glinka in her North Baltimore convent.The Circuit Court jury cited Jones' drug habit and the lack of guidance from his family as reasons for choosing the lesser sentence."Melvin L. Jones' long-term use of illicit narcotics and his family's denial of the wrongness of his recurring criminal behavior are mitigating factors that must be considered as part of the sentencing process," the jury wrote on a verdict sheet after deliberating four hours and 15 minutes.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
A Baltimore jury today will begin deliberating life or death for Melvin Jones, convicted of the murder and attempted rape of Sister MaryAnn Glinka in her order's Northeast Baltimore convent.After legal arguments conclude this morning, the Baltimore Circuit Court jury that found Jones guilty of strangling the nun will decide whether he is to be sentenced to life in prison, life without parole or death.Jones, 34, did not testify in the trial, but court records show he has maintained that he had nothing to do with the March 19 attack on the 51-year-old Franciscan nun.About a dozen members of the Franciscan order -- in an archdiocese that has taken a stand against capital punishment -- watched yesterday as prosecutor Timothy J. Doory asked jurors to send Jones to the gas chamber.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
A jury found Melvin Jones guilty last night of breaking into a North Baltimore convent and murdering and sexually assaulting Sister MaryAnn Glinka -- a crime that outraged the city.The Baltimore Circuit Court jury that deliberated 2 1/2 hours before convicting Jones will now decide whether he should be sentenced to die for strangling the Franciscan nun.Testimony in the sentencing phase of the trial is scheduled to begin tomorrow afternoon. Presiding Judge John C. Themelis said there is an "outside chance" the jury could begin to consider Jones' fate later that day but that those deliberations were more likely to begin Thursday.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Melvin Jones defended himself yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court against charges of raping and murdering a Franciscan nun by calling his relatives as alibi witnesses.The alibi testimony came after a state medical examiner testifying for the prosecution said Sister MaryAnn Glinka may have already been dead when she was raped.Mr. Jones' mother, sister and niece said that he was at the family home on East 32nd Street all evening on March 18 and in the early morning hours of March 19.Prosecutors have suggested that Sister MaryAnn was killed shortly after 1:30 a.m. March 19, when she reported a false alarm at her North Baltimore convent.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
Sister MaryAnn Glinka's brother testified in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday that a wristwatch recovered from suspect Melvin Jones had belonged to the slain Franciscan nun.Ernest J. Glinka's testimony came on the second day of Mr. Jones' trial as prosecutors continued to try to link the defendant to Sister MaryAnn and the Franciscan order's North Baltimore convent."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 9, 1993
Sister MaryAnn Glinka's duties at the Franciscan nun's convent in Baltimore included monitoring the motherhouse's security system. Early on March 19, hearing the alarm triggered once again by the damaged door to the convent's library, she called the security agency to report a false alarm.Minutes later, on her way to check on the door, she was strangled and raped.Prosecutors gave that account of the final moments of the 50-year-old nun's life yesterday during the first day of the trial of her accused killer, Melvin L. Jones, who is charged with first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
A jury found Melvin Jones guilty last night of breaking into a North Baltimore convent and murdering and sexually assaulting Sister MaryAnn Glinka -- a crime that outraged the city.The Baltimore Circuit Court jury that deliberated 2 1/2 hours before convicting Jones will now decide whether he should be sentenced to die for strangling the Franciscan nun.Testimony in the sentencing phase of the trial is scheduled to begin tomorrow afternoon. Presiding Judge John C. Themelis said there is an "outside chance" the jury could begin to consider Jones' fate later that day but that those deliberations were more likely to begin Thursday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Thomas W. Waldron and Jacques Kelly and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writers Staff writer Michael James contributed to this article | March 20, 1993
Helen Glinka sat yesterday in her lifelong home on Fells Point, looking out the window to the cold street outside and recalling the day her daughter MaryAnn decided to join the sisterhood at age 13."I didn't want her to go, she was so young. But I went and talked to the sister, and she assured me that MaryAnn had been called by God," Helen Glinka, 79, said as she clutched a Kleenex."I accepted that, because when I was pregnant, I prayed for a daughter and named her Mary after the Virgin Mary and Ann after Mary's mother, St. Ann. I made it all one word, MaryAnn, because I wanted it known whom she was named after."
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
It was a "bittersweet celebration" in the words of Tom Barrett, a retired Army sergeant and 17-year volunteer at the Franciscan Center on Maryland Avenue.Sister Ritamary Tan, O.S.F., agreed."With Sister MaryAnn's death, we lost some of our momentum," she said of the year of preparations for yesterday's 125th anniversary of the Mill Hill nuns, now known as the Franciscan Sisters of Baltimore City.Addressing bishops, priests, nuns, lay volunteers, donors and other friends assembled for the 1 p.m. Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption on Cathedral Street, Sister Ritamary outlined the history and purposes of the Roman Catholic religious order, calling it "a generative people" and "a peasant community" that has known poverty, enrichment, discrimination, hatred, love, nurturing, death and rebirth since its founding by Mary Basil, a former Anglican sister, in the Mill Hill section of London in 1868.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1993
The ex-convict arrested in connection with the strangling death of Franciscan nun Sister MaryAnn Glinka was indicted yesterday on rape and murder charges.A Baltimore grand jury also indicted Melvin Lorenzo Jones, 34, on burglary and robbery charges and other sex offenses in the March 19 slaying in a Northeast Baltimore convent, the city state's attorney's office said.Timothy J. Doory, head of the Violent Crimes Unit in the state's attorney's office, refused to discuss the evidence presented yesterday to the grand jury, but sources with knowledge of the investigation have said Sister MaryAnn was sexually assaulted and her undergarments were removed.
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