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Sister Mary

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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 1, 2011
Sister Mary Aurea Kimball, who taught in parochial schools for four decades, died of a stroke April 15 at her order's Villa Maria Health Care Center in Woodbrook. She was 82. Rose Marie Kimball was born in Annapolis and grew up on a farm outside the capital. She attended St. Mary's School and entered the School Sisters of Notre Dame. She received the religious name Mary Aurea and professed her first vows in 1950. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland and had a master's degree from Seton Hall University in South Orange, N.J. Sister Aurea's first teaching post was at St. Mark's School in Catonsville, where she taught from 1950 to 1965.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 6, 2011
Sister Mary Lucy Yingling, a member of the Sisters of Mercy whose career as an educator spanned nearly 50 years, died March 31 of complications from Parkinson's disease at The Villa, an assisted-living facility in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County that her order shares with the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart. Sister Mary Lucy was 87. The daughter of a postal worker and a homemaker, she was born Katherine Teresa Yingling, the fifth of nine children, in Washington and raised in Georgetown.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Sister Mary Frieda Chetelat, a nun with the Sisters of Mercy who was admired for her talents as a teacher, her social activism and her relentless humor, died on March 3. She was 97 and had been in the order for seven decades, during which she also was a principal at two Baltimore schools and a teacher at several others. She was born Bernadine Mary Chetelat on Dec. 18, 1913, the first of Harry and Frieda Chetelat's 10 children, all of whom were born in the family's home on Lasalle Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
Sister John Marie Stack, a member of the Sisters of St. Francis and a registered nurse who had been a director of nursing services and a chaplain, died Feb. 24 of cancer at Assisi House, her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 81. Marguerite Mary Stack was born in Brighton, Mass., and raised in Revere, Mass., where she graduated from Immaculate Conception High School. She entered the Sisters of St. Francis in 1947 and professed her vows in 1950. She was a 1953 graduate of Baltimore's St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing, which was located on Caroline Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Sister Mary Carmen Deschapelles, an Oblate Sister of Providence and retired parochial school educator, died Dec. 29 of heart failure at Future Care Nursing Home at North Point. She was 86. Caridad Maria Deschapelles Cassio was born and raised in Cardenas, Cuba. She was a graduate of St. Jose High School in Cardenas and earned a bachelor's degree from Cardenas Institute. She entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence in 1944 and professed her vows in 1947, taking the name Sister Mary Carmen.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 5, 2010
Sister Mary Carmen Gannon, a retired physician who founded a medical mission in Guyana, died of stroke complications Tuesday at the Sisters of Mercy Convent in Savannah, Ga. She was 79. Born Theresa Gannon in Baltimore and raised on Ensor Street in East Baltimore, she was the daughter of an Irish-born mother and a father who had a horse-drawn coaching business and later operated a limousine service. She was a 1949 graduate of the Institute Notre Dame, where she played sports. She attended the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing and later entered the Sisters of Mercy.
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