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NEWS
March 12, 1993
The critic Wynford Dewhurst once remarked, "Rare are the artists who distinguish themselves in every branch of art, lucky the man who excelled in one. An example of the latter is Sisley . . . who has left a legacy of some of the most fascinating landscapes ever painted." Dewhurst was referring to Alfred Sisley (1839-1899), one of the neglected masters of Impressionism, whose luminous paintings go on display Sunday in a stunning new show at the Walters Art Gallery.Stories of gifted artists who struggle against impossible odds of poverty and public indifference during their lives only to be recognized as great masters after their deaths have long been the stuff of sentimental novels and movies.
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NEWS
January 22, 1995
The 99,400 people who visited the Walters Art Gallery to see "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven" made the two-month-long exhibition, which closed last weekend, one of the most popular in the museum's history. Only the 1993 retrospective of Impressionist master Alfred Sisley drew more patrons -- and the Sisley show ran a month longer.The Walters is trying to reach out to a wider audience, not only locally but nationally. The chance to put on a show as beautiful as the Gauguin exhibition was a perfect opportunity to move toward that goal.
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NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | March 6, 1993
Near the end of his life, the French painter Camille Pissarro was asked by the young Matisse to define ''impressionism.''The old man thought for a moment before replying: ''An impressionist is a painter who never paints the same picture, who always paints a new picture.'' When Matisse pressed the master to name a typical impressionist, Pissarro responded with a single name: ''Sisley.''Pissarro considered the Anglo-French artist Alfred Sisley (1839-1899) one of the greatest innovators of the pioneering group of artists who revolutionized French painting in the mid-19th century.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 17, 1995
"Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," the blockbuster exhibit that closed Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery, drew huge crowds that made it the second-biggest show in the museum's history.The exhibit brought 99,400 people to the museum during its two-month run, a figure second only to "Sisley," paintings by French impressionist Alfred Sisley, in the spring of 1993. That show, which ran for three months, drew 134,000 visitors.The Gauguin exhibit also set two attendance records for the Walters -- a daily average of 2,100 people and a final-week attendance of 17,400.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | June 27, 1993
After her visit to the recent exhibition of paintings by theImpressionist master Alfred Sisley, Mary Rozenburg of Los Altos, Calif., paused to write in the visitors' comment book:"Sisley must be smiling indeed to see so many of his children in one place -- one hundred years later."The children she had in mind, no doubt, were the 61 Sisley paintings assembled from around the world by the Walters Art Gallery, the Musee D'Orsay in Paris and the British Royal Academy of Art in London.She might have been been surprised to know that real descendants of the English artist were on hand as well.
NEWS
March 10, 1993
The Anglo-French Impressionist master Alfred Sisley (1839-1899) liked to say that he always started a picture by painting the sky.Those skies, brilliantly rendered with billowing white cumulus clouds or muted with the golden tones of sunset, are the first things to strike the eye at the Walters Art Gallery's stunning show devoted to the artist's work that opens March 14.In presenting the first major international retrospective of Sisley's impressionist paintings...
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 14, 1993
There could not be an artist in the world less in step with current fashions in art than Alfred Sisley, and that's one of the things that makes "Sisley: Master Impressionist" at the Walters Art Gallery so refreshing.In a time when it is considered just the thing for art to address social issues, Sisley has nothing to champion, nothing to push, nothing to defend.In a time when art becomes increasingly strident and confrontational, Sisley's work is peaceful, quiet, self-effacing.In a time when to stand still is to be quickly left behind as fad succeeds fad, with Sisley we are brought the work of a man who almost literally stood still for more than 30 years.
NEWS
By James J. Hill | October 18, 1994
Life's a path that's trod on;It is the treading, too.A lighted lane of trees, I like to seePresented in a picture:A Pissaro or a Sisley --Still another place for walkingStill another life to be.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 30, 1993
The good thing about living in Baltimore instead of New York is that you never get jammed by crowds in the museums, like the Sisley mob at the Walters, in Baltimore.If Congress can't knock Yeltsin out of the ring with a single blow, it will try jabbing him to oblivion.The White House wants to make its position on gays in the military perfectly clear. It is ducking.
NEWS
January 22, 1995
The 99,400 people who visited the Walters Art Gallery to see "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven" made the two-month-long exhibition, which closed last weekend, one of the most popular in the museum's history. Only the 1993 retrospective of Impressionist master Alfred Sisley drew more patrons -- and the Sisley show ran a month longer.The Walters is trying to reach out to a wider audience, not only locally but nationally. The chance to put on a show as beautiful as the Gauguin exhibition was a perfect opportunity to move toward that goal.
NEWS
By James J. Hill | October 18, 1994
Life's a path that's trod on;It is the treading, too.A lighted lane of trees, I like to seePresented in a picture:A Pissaro or a Sisley --Still another place for walkingStill another life to be.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | June 27, 1993
After her visit to the recent exhibition of paintings by theImpressionist master Alfred Sisley, Mary Rozenburg of Los Altos, Calif., paused to write in the visitors' comment book:"Sisley must be smiling indeed to see so many of his children in one place -- one hundred years later."The children she had in mind, no doubt, were the 61 Sisley paintings assembled from around the world by the Walters Art Gallery, the Musee D'Orsay in Paris and the British Royal Academy of Art in London.She might have been been surprised to know that real descendants of the English artist were on hand as well.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 30, 1993
The good thing about living in Baltimore instead of New York is that you never get jammed by crowds in the museums, like the Sisley mob at the Walters, in Baltimore.If Congress can't knock Yeltsin out of the ring with a single blow, it will try jabbing him to oblivion.The White House wants to make its position on gays in the military perfectly clear. It is ducking.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 14, 1993
There could not be an artist in the world less in step with current fashions in art than Alfred Sisley, and that's one of the things that makes "Sisley: Master Impressionist" at the Walters Art Gallery so refreshing.In a time when it is considered just the thing for art to address social issues, Sisley has nothing to champion, nothing to push, nothing to defend.In a time when art becomes increasingly strident and confrontational, Sisley's work is peaceful, quiet, self-effacing.In a time when to stand still is to be quickly left behind as fad succeeds fad, with Sisley we are brought the work of a man who almost literally stood still for more than 30 years.
NEWS
March 12, 1993
The critic Wynford Dewhurst once remarked, "Rare are the artists who distinguish themselves in every branch of art, lucky the man who excelled in one. An example of the latter is Sisley . . . who has left a legacy of some of the most fascinating landscapes ever painted." Dewhurst was referring to Alfred Sisley (1839-1899), one of the neglected masters of Impressionism, whose luminous paintings go on display Sunday in a stunning new show at the Walters Art Gallery.Stories of gifted artists who struggle against impossible odds of poverty and public indifference during their lives only to be recognized as great masters after their deaths have long been the stuff of sentimental novels and movies.
NEWS
March 10, 1993
The Anglo-French Impressionist master Alfred Sisley (1839-1899) liked to say that he always started a picture by painting the sky.Those skies, brilliantly rendered with billowing white cumulus clouds or muted with the golden tones of sunset, are the first things to strike the eye at the Walters Art Gallery's stunning show devoted to the artist's work that opens March 14.In presenting the first major international retrospective of Sisley's impressionist paintings...
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 17, 1995
"Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," the blockbuster exhibit that closed Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery, drew huge crowds that made it the second-biggest show in the museum's history.The exhibit brought 99,400 people to the museum during its two-month run, a figure second only to "Sisley," paintings by French impressionist Alfred Sisley, in the spring of 1993. That show, which ran for three months, drew 134,000 visitors.The Gauguin exhibit also set two attendance records for the Walters -- a daily average of 2,100 people and a final-week attendance of 17,400.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | September 6, 1992
The first half of the 19th century is generally thought to be Baltimore's high point -- in growth, prosperity, and the creative arts. Next spring and summer we will get to see some of the finest of those arts, and how they compare with what people were doing elsewhere, when the Maryland Historical Society and the Baltimore Museum of Art open two complementary exhibits.The MHS will have "Classical Maryland, 1815-1845: Fine anDecorative Arts from Our State's Golden Age" (opening April 17), bringing together 300 objects from the society's collection and 35 lenders nationally.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | March 6, 1993
Near the end of his life, the French painter Camille Pissarro was asked by the young Matisse to define ''impressionism.''The old man thought for a moment before replying: ''An impressionist is a painter who never paints the same picture, who always paints a new picture.'' When Matisse pressed the master to name a typical impressionist, Pissarro responded with a single name: ''Sisley.''Pissarro considered the Anglo-French artist Alfred Sisley (1839-1899) one of the greatest innovators of the pioneering group of artists who revolutionized French painting in the mid-19th century.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | September 6, 1992
The first half of the 19th century is generally thought to be Baltimore's high point -- in growth, prosperity, and the creative arts. Next spring and summer we will get to see some of the finest of those arts, and how they compare with what people were doing elsewhere, when the Maryland Historical Society and the Baltimore Museum of Art open two complementary exhibits.The MHS will have "Classical Maryland, 1815-1845: Fine anDecorative Arts from Our State's Golden Age" (opening April 17), bringing together 300 objects from the society's collection and 35 lenders nationally.
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