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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 28, 2005
Robert Sirota, whose 10-year tenure as director of the Peabody Conservatory helped to generate an extraordinary growth in the institution's artistic reputation and physical properties, has been named president of the Manhattan School of Music. The appointment, effective Oct. 1, will be a homecoming for Sirota, 55, who was born in New York City and did some of his early studies at the Juilliard School of Music. "I'm not leaving because I'm in any way disappointed in Peabody," Sirota said yesterday.
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By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | June 4, 2007
Crossing the traffic circle in the heart of town on foot takes courage. Delaware Avenue, with its patched pavement, looks more like an alley than a road through central Towson. And, according to one expert, the attempts to spruce up the sidewalks along York Road with trees and bricks have just ended up tripping people. "People are walking in Towson because they need to, not because it's pleasant," said Stuart Sirota, founder of TND Planning Group, a Baltimore-based transportation consulting firm.
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FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
As Robert Sirota discusses the future of American music conservatories, a bit of the past looks on.Mr. Sirota, who this Friday becomes director of the Peabody Institute, is having lunch at the Peabody American Grill, a hotel restaurant a short walk from the music school. Hanging on the wall, overlooking him like a protective deity, is a photograph of Ernest Hutcheson -- long-ago faculty member at the Peabody, acclaimed pianist, renowned composer and, in a sense, mentor to Mr. Sirota."My first piano teacher took lessons from Hutcheson," he says.
NEWS
By CAROL KLEIMAN and CAROL KLEIMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2005
Why is enthusiasm about where you work and the people you work for so important? "The more enthusiasm a work force has, the higher the performance of a company," said David Sirota, founder of Sirota Survey Intelligence, a group of industrial psychologists based in Purchase, N.Y., who use survey methods to help companies improve managerial skills. "People come to work wanting to be enthusiastic, and they are - at least in the beginning," said Sirota, who has a doctorate in social psychology and has done behavioral science research for businesses for more than 40 years.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
In 1995, new vicar Victoria R. Sirota arrived at the Episcopal Church of the Holy Nativity in Park Heights with a bundle of idealistic expectations for the children in her congregation. Under the church's wing, these kids would not become teen parents. They would go to college. They would not get arrested. But Sirota soon found that even a loving, resourceful church could not shield children completely from the troubled neighborhood's grip. As her young flock grew up, some had babies, dropped out of school, were charged with crimes.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
Six girls sit in a Park Heights church basement before choir practice, munching animal crackers and chatting about murder.That guy was killed down the street New Year's Eve because someone was jealous. They shot him, and when he was on the ground, they shot him again. They made sure he was dead.The girls reach for more cookies.Their priest, Victoria R. Sirota, listens to their discussion, at a loss for words. Harvard Divinity School didn't give her a script for moments like these, didn't prepare her for children who talk about shootings the way some kids talk about video games.
NEWS
By CAROL KLEIMAN and CAROL KLEIMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2005
Why is enthusiasm about where you work and the people you work for so important? "The more enthusiasm a work force has, the higher the performance of a company," said David Sirota, founder of Sirota Survey Intelligence, a group of industrial psychologists based in Purchase, N.Y., who use survey methods to help companies improve managerial skills. "People come to work wanting to be enthusiastic, and they are - at least in the beginning," said Sirota, who has a doctorate in social psychology and has done behavioral science research for businesses for more than 40 years.
BUSINESS
By Graeme Browning | February 16, 1991
The resignation of one senior lawyer this week at the law firm of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway & Goldman and the departure of a second for a competitor stemmed from a clash of philosophies, a member of the firm's management committee said yesterday.Former Bankruptcy Judge Harvey Lebowitz resigned from Frank, Bernstein, Baltimore's third-largest law firm, on Wednesday. The next day Irving E. Walker, also a bankruptcy specialist, announced he would join Miles & Stockbridge, the fourth-largest firm in the city.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Robert Sirota, chairman of the music department at New York University, is to become director of the Peabody Institute, Baltimore's nationally renowned music conservatory.A composer, conductor and educator, Dr. Sirota promised yesterday to honor the 137-year-old school's traditions while embracing the changes in society and technology that will arrive with the 21st century."I don't think people need to fear that change will somehow diminish the great things that already exist," Dr. Sirota said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
Yesterday's concert at Second Presbyterian Church in Baltimore was a family affair.Robert Sirota, director of the Peabody Institute, his wife, Victoria, their son, Jonah, and daughter, Nadia, performed with an unusual combination of violas, piano and organ at a presentation in the church's concert series.The parents said they were especially pleased with how well the children played."If I hadn't been playing, I would have cried," Mrs. Sirota said.While it would seem natural for this musically gifted family to perform together, their mastery of seemingly incompatible instruments made yesterday's performance a challenge to the musical repertoire and family relations.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
In 1995, new vicar Victoria R. Sirota arrived at the Episcopal Church of the Holy Nativity in Park Heights with a bundle of idealistic expectations for the children in her congregation. Under the church's wing, these kids would not become teen parents. They would go to college. They would not get arrested. But Sirota soon found that even a loving, resourceful church could not shield children completely from the troubled neighborhood's grip. As her young flock grew up, some had babies, dropped out of school, were charged with crimes.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 28, 2005
Robert Sirota, whose 10-year tenure as director of the Peabody Conservatory helped to generate an extraordinary growth in the institution's artistic reputation and physical properties, has been named president of the Manhattan School of Music. The appointment, effective Oct. 1, will be a homecoming for Sirota, 55, who was born in New York City and did some of his early studies at the Juilliard School of Music. "I'm not leaving because I'm in any way disappointed in Peabody," Sirota said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun Staff | May 2, 2004
CBS News Sunday Morning anchor Charles Osgood, looking slightly more rumpled than usual, was hamming it up with Peabody Institute Director Robert Sirota. The two were sharing a seat at the grand piano in Peabody's Goodwin Recital Hall, banging out bars from "The Blue Danube" waltz. Sirota called Osgood a "natural stride pianist" and admired his "big left hand." "You can come back and play here anytime," Sirota offered. It was a nicer reception than he'd had the last time he'd been on this very stage --more than 60 years before -- at a piano recital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2003
A typical Sunday is coming up, one with an abundance of concerts scheduled for mid-afternoon. If you're not among the lucky ones who have tickets for the sold-out season-opener of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society at 3 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church, that still leaves you with more than enough options. You can hear one of Bach's extraordinary cantatas conducted by T. Herbert Dimmock at 3 p.m. at First English Lutheran Church, 3807 N. Charles St. It's free; for more information, call 410-235-2356.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | February 3, 2002
The next program from the Concert Artists of Baltimore, planned long before the September tragedy unleashed a fresh wave of patriotism, seems doubly appropriate now. This "American Sampler," conducted by Edward Polochick, offers quite a cross-section of the country's rich reservoir of music. Among the attractions will be Aaron Copland's Clarinet Concerto, with its exquisitely smooth, lyrical fusion of jazz and classical idioms; David Drosinos will be the soloist. And there will be a rare opportunity to hear Darker America, a 1924 symphonic poem by the great African-American composer William Grant Still, whose output has been absurdly neglected.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 11, 2001
Mozart called the organ "The King of Instruments," and it's hard to argue with him. For a reminder of what prompted the composer's enthusiasm, consider these two programs. David Higgs, a much-traveled soloist and head of the organ department at the Eastman School of Music, will give a free recital at 3:30 p.m. today for the Community Concerts at Second series, Second Presbyterian Church, 4200 St. Paul St. Call 410-719-7357. Three more organists will collaborate on a concert at 7:30 p.m. today in Griswold Hall, Peabody Conservatory, 1 E. Mt. Vernon Place.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | October 12, 1990
A craggy-faced man in a blue baseball cap comes into Lombard Paint & Hardware in Fells Point looking for chlorinated lime to dry out deer antlers so that they can be mounted on a wall.None in stock, says salesman Kenny Crawley, but the store will get some for him by the end of the day.Next comes Joseph Pinder, a retired seaman. As he browses around the hardware store, he chats with salesman and avid angler Steve Campbell about his most recent catch.Then a dark-haired teen-ager walks in slowly, quickly asking for a can of spray paint.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | June 4, 2007
Crossing the traffic circle in the heart of town on foot takes courage. Delaware Avenue, with its patched pavement, looks more like an alley than a road through central Towson. And, according to one expert, the attempts to spruce up the sidewalks along York Road with trees and bricks have just ended up tripping people. "People are walking in Towson because they need to, not because it's pleasant," said Stuart Sirota, founder of TND Planning Group, a Baltimore-based transportation consulting firm.
NEWS
October 3, 2001
We need new music to help us face fears, keep our spirits alive The defensive responses to David Zinman's resignation as music director emeritus of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (BSO) by Tim Smith ("Departure won't hurt BSO image," Sept. 18) and the editorial "Symphony for troubled times" (Sept. 20) are understandable, especially given the musical gifts of Yuri Temirkanov. However, the gift Mr. Zinman has given us in this decision is to bring up an issue important to the vibrancy of our culture.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2001
It's hard to imagine that a little party could help bridge a centuries-long divide between two neighboring Pimlico churches. But that's what members of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church and the Episcopal Church of the Holy Nativity were hoping for when they held a joint celebration yesterday. The two congregations worshiped together, first at Holy Nativity, then two blocks away at St. John's, and they prayed together at the site of a redevelopment project located squarely between the two churches, before sharing a fellowship dinner.
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