Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSirius
IN THE NEWS

Sirius

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
An ebullient Howard Stern, newly unconstrained by federal regulations that limit obscenity over airwaves, launched his satellite radio program yesterday morning and claimed, none too modestly, that he was at the forefront of a radio revolution. Predictably, his debut was peppered with curses and references to sex - the same fare that made him notorious years ago. "It's a great triumph for us," Stern crowed during his first four-hour show, which was commercial-free, on Sirius Satellite Radio.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
No. 1-ranked and undefeated Maryland had six student-athletes selected to the Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association All-Region team, announced Tuesday. Seniors Katie Schwarzmann (Century), Alex Aust , Iliana Sanza (St. Paul's) and freshman Taylor Cummings (McDonogh) were all named to the All-South Region first team, while sophomore Brooke Griffin (South River) and freshman Alice Mercer (Century) earned second-team honors. Schwarzmann, who earned her second straight Atlantic Coast Conference Offensive Player of the Year honor Monday, was named to the first team All-South Region for the fourth time at Maryland.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
I'm drivin' in my car I turn on the radio ... And there's the Boss wailing out another tune. There's Bruce in the morning, Bruce in the afternoon, Bruce in the evening. There's Bruce 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Yes, starting today, if you love his music, you can hear all Bruce Springsteen, all the time as Sirius Satellite Radio launches a commercial-free channel devoted to the music of the New Jersey rock legend and his E Street Band. Naturally, there's a marketing tie-in: The start-up of E Street Radio coincides with the 30th anniversary of the release of the band's celebrated Born to Run album, which has been remastered and reissued by Columbia Records and will be released as a box set Nov. 15. In addition to round-the-clock music from Bruce and the band, the channel will feature discussions about their albums, conversations with band members and interviews of just about everyone ever associated with the band over the past 30-plus years.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Johnny Castle , a 12-year resident of Hickory Ridge Village, in Columbia, was honored with his band mates, the Nighthawks , with the 2011 Blues Music Award for Acoustic Album of the Year. Their release, "Last Train From Bluesville" was recorded live at XM/Sirius studios, in Washington. The Nighthawks will perform at the Second Chance Saloon Sept. 9.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mel Karmazin clarified yesterday his pledge to freeze prices in order to win approval of the proposed $4.29 billion purchase of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Karmazin, testifying at a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on digital radio, said XM or Sirius subscribers who elect to keep their existing service after the companies combine won't see a price increase from the...
BUSINESS
December 1, 2007
XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Shares rose $1.86, or 14 percent, to $15.60 yesterday after Bear Stearns & Co. said the Department of Justice may approve XM's merger with rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 21, 2004
XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., the biggest satellite radio service, reached an 11-year, $650 million agreement yesterday to broadcast Major League Baseball games, countering Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.'s contracts to carry National Football League games and Howard Stern's talk show. XM Satellite, based in Washington, is adding attractions to maintain its subscriber lead over Sirius, the second-largest pay-radio service. XM Satellite said in a statement that it will broadcast the games beginning in 2005.
NEWS
January 29, 2006
1968: Getting Sirius In January 1968, strange things were happening in the skies above Anne Arundel County. A brilliant, gyrating light was reported near the horizon by a variety of witnesses, including state police and radiomen at the U.S. Naval Academy. One state police trooper described the sighting as resembling "a bright light bulb bouncing up and down in the sky." The light, dubbed the "Great Arundel County Flying Saucer" by the Evening Sun, drew investigators from a committee studying unidentified flying objects over the United States.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Johnny Castle , a 12-year resident of Hickory Ridge Village, in Columbia, was honored with his band mates, the Nighthawks , with the 2011 Blues Music Award for Acoustic Album of the Year. Their release, "Last Train From Bluesville" was recorded live at XM/Sirius studios, in Washington. The Nighthawks will perform at the Second Chance Saloon Sept. 9.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
It's coming from outer space, and it's going to take over your car radio. At least, that's the plan of two companies who are vying for one of the hottest new broadcasting developments since a guy named Guglielmo Marconi figured out a way to wirelessly send telegraph signals. It's called satellite radio, and if you think it's complicated, it isn't -- the bottom line is it's a great new option for listening to radio on the road. The two companies offering satellite radio service, XM and Sirius, each offer more than 100 channels of music, talk, sports and news radio stations that are beamed via upper-atmosphere orbiters into your car (or even your home, for that matter)
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2008
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators appeared poised yesterday to give final approval to the merger of the nation's only two satellite radio operators, which would bring together the struggling companies after a 17-month quest. Deborah Taylor Tate, a Republican who held the swing vote on the five-member Federal Communications Commission, reportedly was ready to vote in favor of the $3.9 billion merger if Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. agreed to new conditions.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2007
XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Shares rose $1.86, or 14 percent, to $15.60 yesterday after Bear Stearns & Co. said the Department of Justice may approve XM's merger with rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.
BUSINESS
By This column was compiled from dispatches by the Associated and Bloomberg News | October 5, 2007
Nation : Earnings Sealy profit declines 27% Sealy Corp. said third-quarter profit fell 27 percent. Net income declined to $21.5 million, or 22 cents a share, from $29.4 million, or 30 cents a share, a year earlier, the company said yesterday. Acquisitions Bain-3Com deal due security review Bain Capital Partners will submit for a national security review its planned $2.2 billion buyout of network equipment maker 3Com Corp. to address concerns about a Chinese telecommunications company's minority stake.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | August 26, 2007
With all these new gadgets for listening to music -- from MP3s to state-of-the-art cell phones and laptops, not to mention satellite radio -- it's a wonder anyone is listening to good old-fashioned terrestrial radio. One theory says that so many listeners are spending money on newfangled technology that the ones left tuning in to terrestrial radio are doing so only because they can't afford the new toys. "Because of satellite radio, more affluent people are going to use that service, so we have a smaller piece of the pie to slice up with the people remaining, who are not so affluent," said Bob Pettit, general manager of WCBM, the Baltimore talk-radio station at 680 AM. "The younger people are going to the new technologies.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Hoping to persuade skeptical regulators to approve their proposed merger, the nation's two satellite radio companies announced detailed plans yesterday to give consumers the ability to choose the programs that make up their subscription package. The companies, Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., said they would offer two "a la carte" pricing plans. One would enable consumers to purchase the best of the premium services offered by each company - like professional football, baseball and basketball broadcasts - for a monthly fee of $14.99.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mel Karmazin clarified yesterday his pledge to freeze prices in order to win approval of the proposed $4.29 billion purchase of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Karmazin, testifying at a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on digital radio, said XM or Sirius subscribers who elect to keep their existing service after the companies combine won't see a price increase from the...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 2001
XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc.'s chief executive officer said it made enough sales during the holiday period to meet analysts' estimates for 20,000 to 30,000 subscribers to the satellite radio service by Monday. Shares of XM rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. gained 8.1 percent, led by expectations that the companies' sales will prove pessimists wrong, analysts said. Both money-losing companies had missed subscriber estimates after delaying the introduction of service. XM has twice lowered its subscriber goals.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | March 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mel Karmazin defended the proposed purchase of rival broadcaster XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., pledging not to raise prices and saying consumers would have more options. "We firmly believe that this transaction is essential to preserving and enhancing choice for consumers," Karmazin said in prepared testimony today before the House Judiciary Committee task force scrutinizing the $4.5 billion deal. Karmazin and XM Chairman Gary Parsons are trying to convince U.S. regulators that joining the only satellite radio services won't harm consumers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.