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NEWS
February 19, 1993
Too bad Baltimore County Sheriff Norman Pepersack doesn't have arrest powers. Then he could slap the cuffs on himself for his repeated attempts to impersonate a police officer.The sheriff was in Annapolis last Wednesday to lobby the legislature for permission to put lights and sirens on his department's 36 cars. He'll be refused, though, just as county officials shot down his previous efforts to outfit his vehicles with lights and sirens like those the real cops use. In the wake of major layoffs in the county, the tens of thousands of dollars for the lights and sirens would be a particularly nonsensical expense.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Emergency management officials have located a rogue siren sounding in the Fells Point area Friday morning. The malfunctioning siren located on Eastern Avenue just east of Fells Point is part of the city siren system, according to The Mayor's Office of Emergency Management. Repairs will be made immediately. The Mayor's Office of Emergency Management received several reports this morning of the siren. andrea.walker@baltsun.com Twitter.com/ankwalker
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 20, 1991
These being touchy times, Eva Sicca had an immediate reaction to a Civil Defense siren that wailed over East Baltimore for more than a half-hour yesterday."
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 15, 2013
The Harford County Department of Emergency Services, in conjunction with Exelon Power, is notifying residents about testing dates this month and next for a new emergency warning siren system for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station in neighboring York County, Pa. The testing, which begins Wednesday and will run weekly into early August, is being conducted in accordance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency requirements for new siren systems,...
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
Sonny Miller wanted something different at yesterday's auction at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. Nothing like John Lennon's psychedelic Rolls-Royce, Madonna's 1969 Mercedes or even Jacqueline McLean's Mercury Grand Marquis. This wasn't Sotheby's, after all. We're talking Timonium.No, at the first auction anyone around here remembers for emergency vehicles, Mr. Miller bid for a 1986 Econoline 350 ambulance, with plenty of room for arm boards, head blocks, burn sheets and an amputation kit. Canary yellow and only 93,000 miles on this baby!
NEWS
April 13, 2003
Three different sets of emergency sirens are tested monthly in Harford County. Civil Defense sirens are tested at 1 p.m. the first Monday of each month. Peach Bottom nuclear plant sirens are tested at 1 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month. Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program siren sounds at 4 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month; this test includes a 30-second blast of the siren followed by a voice message explaining that it is a test. If you hear the emergency sirens at any other time, a real emergency is taking place and you need to take shelter.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 10, 1993
"Sirens" is "The Rookies" with a gender switch. Instead of three young men, three young women join a big-city police force in this new drama series from ABC, which premieres at 10 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13).Who says there are no new ideas at the networks? Who says the networks aren't on the cutting edge of social trends? Who dares to think that the all-male television programming councils don't understand working women? Who thought up that title? This is what ABC is canceling "Civil Wars" for?
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
In many parts of the United States, it would seem absurd: the local sheriff asking for permission to put police lights and sirens on his deputies' cars. But in Baltimore County, it's true.Sheriff Norman M. Pepersack Jr. was scheduled to testify today before the House Judiciary Committee in Annapolis, arguing that his 36 deputies' vehicles should be equipped with the customary law enforcement accessories.Baltimore County sheriff's deputies don't patrol, arrest suspects or make traffic stops.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
Traffic investigators were trying to determine yesterday who was at fault Thursday night when a police cruiser speeding to an emergency crashed into an ambulance that was carrying a patient.Both vehicles were severely damaged, but police said the occupants were not seriously injured. A 17-year-old high school student who was riding with paramedics as part of a school project was one of the injured.The accident occurred about 10: 15 p.m. at Echodale and Walther avenues in Northeast Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 25, 1994
The message of John Duigan's new film is obvious: Do not send to know for whom the sirens sing; they sing for thee.The song they sing is the song of flesh and its possibilities, of sliding through sensations, of the profound and delightful lassitude that follows mingling it and all the happy work you have to do to get there. For "Sirens" refights the oldest of human battles, between Eros and order, between flesh and discipline, between the rock and the soft spot.The place and time are Australia somewhere in the still-Victorian '30s.
EXPLORE
April 2, 2013
I think a siren warning system in Howard County is needed. Carroll County has a siren warning system to warn its citizens of weather emergencies. I have written to the Howard County government suggesting this, but it has fallen on deaf ears. Hurricane season is coming. We've had tornadoes. People are not always near a computer to get alerts, nor does everyone have a cellphone on which to get alerts. It is time for Howard County to step up further to protect its citizens. And while we're talking about it, what is Howard County doing to adhere to the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS)
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | December 6, 2012
I had always wished that my great-grandmother, who lived in Maryland during the Civil War, had written some personal notes as to what it was like for her at the time. They would be especially interesting for us now. With that thought in mind, I wrote some of my memories of World War II for my grandchildren. I attach the article for your review since Dec 7 is today, it puts a human touch on the anniversary date. Some things you never forget, and those of us living with memories of WWII recall with great sadness a quiet Sunday morning, Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
By John R. Leopold | September 17, 2012
At considerable taxpayer expense, Gov. Martin O'Malley convened a special session of the General Assembly last month to expand gambling to a sixth site in Prince George's County. If his proposal is approved by the voters in November, this legislation will result in no real financial gain to the citizens of Maryland, oversaturate the state with casinos, and seriously jeopardize the revenue that state and local governments are receiving from operations at the current casino sites. Question 7, as it is known, also sends a pernicious message to potential investors that the state of Maryland is an unreliable business partner.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
Much of the country has probably paid scant attention to the debate over the 1,700-mile pipeline known as Keystone XL, which is proposed to connect Alberta, Canada, with Texas refineries. But in Washington, State Department review of the $7 billion project has become a messy affair, and the Obama administration is clearly torn over whether to support or reject it. On the one side are jobs, potentially thousands of them, tied to the construction of the pipeline, as well as the prospect of tapping Canada's tar sands to help meet America's energy needs.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
As if on cue during an event to mark the Baltimore City Fire Department's 150th year, sirens shrieked and ladder trucks raced up North Gay Street just minutes after the fire chief stepped up to the podium. "That noise is a working fire going on," James S. Clack, chief of the city's Fire Department, told the crowd of onlookers, firefighters and officials who gathered Saturday at War Memorial Plaza downtown. "If it gets any bigger, we might all have to leave." Speeches praising the department's dedication and perseverance would be interrupted twice more as a fire under way on Belair Road went to two alarms, then three.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2008
This August, Baltimore City residents might notice fewer sirens from firetrucks speeding to emergencies. Baltimore Fire Chief James S. Clack said the city Fire Department will launch a multitiered response system to save the city money spent sending unnecessary equipment on nonemergency calls and to increase the safety of emergency responders and other drivers on the road. "We just want to make sure we are matching our response with our risk," Clack said. Under the new policy, calls to the department will be deemed "hot," "warm" or "cold."
NEWS
By KATHY HUDSON | February 26, 2003
FRIENDS IN Evergreen, Keswick, Hampden and Medfield have been calling to see if I have noticed all the sirens. How could I miss them? It sounds as if we are living at the epicenter of perpetual disaster. The intersection of Cold Spring Lane and Roland Avenue is in one of the increasingly noisy city neighborhoods. I live near there. Since we moved here in 1959, Cold Spring has been anything but a lane. First, it was more like an avenue. Then houses were torn down to widen it. Every year since, it seems more like an interstate highway.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1996
It was a mistake, a malfunction, a muffed attempt to mend the mute: That's how civil defense sirens began wailing through Baltimore on an otherwise peaceful Thursday afternoon this week.The 112-siren alarm system, a remnant of the Cold War and its nuclear fears, has sounded across the city at 1 p.m. every Monday for 32 years. But this week it fell silent, and when technicians tried to fix it, they tapped into the wrong circuit about 1:30 p.m. Thursday and set off seven of the sirens for 10 minutes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Brent Jones and Frank D. Roylance and Brent Jones,Sun Reporters | June 11, 2008
The region's late-spring heat wave ended with a bang overnight as a barrage of showers and thunderstorms pummeled the area, cutting power, toppling trees and frightening drivers. More than 58,000 customers in Central Maryland had lost power by 10 p.m. as the storms rolled toward the Baltimore region, according to BGE. The wind and rain boiled up ahead of a cool front moving out of the Midwest, which is expected to reduce the humidity that has smothered the area since Saturday. However, the storms that brought the cooler weather were fierce - and nearly fatal.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | June 27, 2007
There are two types of people in this world: Those who buy the latest high-tech gadgets, and those who wait for all the kinks to be ironed out and the price to drop and then, when they're finally ready to buy, the thing is obsolete and replaced by an even more expensive gadget. It would probably shock you to learn which group I identify with. OK, here's a hint: I won't be camping out tomorrow night with the armies of nerds lusting over the newest gotta-have-it tech marvel, the iPhone from Apple, which goes on sale Friday at 6 p.m. to much hype and hoopla.
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