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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
"Sir Norbert Smith: A Life" sounds like just the sort of self-important biography of an upper crust British actor you'd expect to find on PBS' Great Performances, which is exactly where it will air at 10 o'clock tonight on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.But there is no Sir Norbert. This hour is a parody. Not only has Great Performances taken the highly unusual step of putting on something funny, it's actually poking fun at itself.As conceived by Harry Enfield, who produced this for the BBC's Channel 4 and plays the title character, Sir Norbert never did anything worthwhile in his long career, but managed to be popular and well-known in spite of it.He's now a dottering old picture of knighted senility, still much-beloved by his adoring England as he putters about his expansive house, unable to remember virtually anything about his life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
  By now, you have surely heard all about the Seattle Symphony's Web-phenomenon -- a viral YouTube clip of the orchestra teaming up with Sir Mix-a-Lot for a version of his 1990s posterior-fixated rap hit "Baby Got Back. " By now, you may also be in counseling after seeing the video. Some folks, among them the ever-readable classical music pooh-bah Norman Lebrecht , have railed mightily against what went down in Seattle. Others see this as a harmless bit of cross-over that can catch the attention of folks who otherwise may never give a symphony orchestra a second thought.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 22, 1999
BOSTON -- I admit that the words ring awkwardly in my Yankee ears. "Yes, sir" and "No, sir" sound more like the language of a boot camp than a classroom.But the Louisiana legislature has just come up with a new language curriculum. Last week, they mandated "yes ma'ams" and "no sirs" for schoolchildren talking to school employees.Led by the governor, the politicians decided that you can legislate respect. Or, maybe just obedience.The Louisiana linguistics order that will begin in elementary school and graduate to high school, comes at a time when Americans have focused anxious attention on children.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
John Wendell Compton Sr., a retired disc jockey known on the air as Sir Johnny O, died of heart failure Oct. 29 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Randallstown resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised on Division Street, he was the son of Herbert Roy Compton Sr., a Baptist preacher, and Esther Mae Compton, a homemaker. He was a 1956 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He then served in the Army. He went into radio broadcasting and worked at WWRL-AM in New York and WDAS-AM radio in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 7, 1991
LEWISBURG, Pa. -- The new inmate is standing in front of th mess hall door, marching stiffly in place, hair clipped, eyes forward, shoulders back, chin up.Lunch is just 10 feet to his right -- spaghetti, salad, tacos and banana ice cream. But it will have to wait. For Officer Silas Irvin is to his left.This is chow time at the Federal Intensive Confinement Center, home to a new federal experiment in handling income tax cheats, forgers and drug dealers. And Silas Irvin is Uncle Sam's notion of tough love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 26, 2001
For Sir Richard Eyre, his six-part television series Changing Stages is an exercise in the art of the impossible. "Theater insists on being live, in the present tense," he says in the opening episode. "It can't be recorded. You can't show it on television." Or, as he puts it in the handsome coffee table book he co-wrote with playwright Nicholas Wright to accompany the PBS series, "Making television programs about the theater is as quaint a folly as putting ventriloquists on the radio."
NEWS
June 16, 2006
TV PICK--Newton's Dark Secrets-- A look at the manuscripts of Sir Isaac Newton. (MPT, Tuesday, 8 p.m.)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 2001
Bowie Community Theatre opens its season with a pleasant bit of escapism in Agatha Christie's Black Coffee, a mystery guaranteed to keep an audience wide-awake. Action in the thriller, which runs through Oct. 20, takes place in the drawing room of an upper-class English family. Black Coffee, written in 1930, was Christie's first play. She created characters such as wealthy scientist and despotic patriarch Sir Claud Amory (Mike Dunlop); his son, Richard Amory, who is forced to live frugally; and Richard's sensitive and stressed Italian wife, Lucia.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall , young Richard Cromwell says to his uncle, the rising Thomas Cromwell, "You are practiced at persuading, and sometimes it's quite difficult, sir, to distinguish being persuaded by you from being knocked down in the street and stamped on. " That's what I aim for at this blog, being persuasive.  
NEWS
January 16, 2004
This is a partial transcript of a 911 call received shortly after Tuesday's crash on Interstate 95. Dispatcher: Howard County 911 Female Caller: Hello, we have an emergency here on 95. Holy ---- ! D: What, ma'am? Calm down, where on 95 are you? C: Howard County line. D: You're right at the line? C: Sir, there's been an explosion. D: Ma'am, the Baltimore County line or the PG County line? C: Howard and Baltimore County, sir. Holy cow! D: OK, what exactly happened? C: Cars, and a truck.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall , young Richard Cromwell says to his uncle, the rising Thomas Cromwell, "You are practiced at persuading, and sometimes it's quite difficult, sir, to distinguish being persuaded by you from being knocked down in the street and stamped on. " That's what I aim for at this blog, being persuasive.  
EXPLORE
October 25, 2011
Editor: In response to Mr. Shaffer [regarding the spill of sewage into the Chesapeake Bay during recent heavy rain], my response to Mr. Hynes [of the Harford County Department of Public Works] performance was to the information provided by Mr. Hynes. Again, to describe allowing any overflow of the magnitude of 263,000 gallons to spill into the environment, including the Bush River, as excellent is indefensible. I applaud your efforts sir, but the system is inadequate as I alluded to, not your attempt to do your job. I did not hear of anyone from Baltimore County or City describe their efforts of overflow control as excellent or adequate.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,mike.preston@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
Ravens wide receiver Kelley Washington might not do his "Squirrel" dance for the rest of this season, but he will never stop dancing. He can't get enough. Whether it's "The Super Man," "The Soldier Boy," "The Jerk,"or any of the other latest dances, Washington is going to bust another move. "I will never stop until my last play is up," said Washington, in his seventh season. "When I retire, and guys do something big in a game, I will dance for them." Never in the brief history of the Ravens has there been so much controversy over a player dancing.
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 11, 2008
Sir Edmund Hillary, the mountain-climbing New Zealand beekeeper who became a mid-20th century hero as the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, has died. He was 88. Sir Edmund, who made his historic climb to the top of the world's highest mountain with the Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay of Nepal, died yesterday at a hospital in Auckland, according to an announcement from the office of New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. The cause of death was not immediately announced.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | November 16, 2006
Most of the scenes in The School for Scandal at Everyman Theatre begin with the actors frozen in tableaux on a platform at the back of the stage. Then the platform glides forward and the action begins. Not only do the tableaux on designer Daniel Ettinger's sets resemble paintings (especially paintings by William Hogarth), but the scenery, including the curtains, consists primarily of two-dimensional paintings. Yet there's nothing static about director Vincent M. Lancisi's vibrant production of this 1777 comedy of manners, written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and adapted by Michael Bawtree.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | November 11, 2006
That first year away was trying enough for Navy sophomore slotback Shun White. He had a hard time adjusting to the cold weather in Newport, R.I., home of the Naval Academy Prep School. He badly missed his family and friends, and for the first time, he could not indulge his craving for Memphis barbecued ribs. Then came his plebe year in Annapolis, where White struggled at times adjusting to the ultra-orderly details imposed on him at Bancroft Hall, home of the Brigade of Midshipmen. To watch White now is to witness perhaps Navy's fastest player, who is learning how to fit in, on and off the field.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 3, 1997
New York had three times as many murders as Baltimore in 1996, but needed 10 times the population to commit them.This is a good place to visit, but you wouldn't want to live here.It is now Sir Paul McCartney, in case anyone doubts that he is past it.The civil war is over in Guatemala after 36 years, although it is hard to tell the difference.Pub Date: 1/03/97
NEWS
February 16, 1994
JAMES Boswell's biography of Samuel Johnson could probably be classified as one of those essential literary works that few people actually read.Still, the odd browse through the weighty (about a couple pounds) tome can offer a passage or two of insight and amusement even for late-20th century readers. For example, this one from April 1779, in which Boswell recounts the opinionated doctor's views on the beverages served at a dinner party:"Johnson harangued upon the qualities of different liquors; and spoke with great contempt of claret, as so weak, that 'a man would be drowned by it before it made him drunk.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,sun reporter | October 16, 2006
Your country 'tis of three. Three hundred million, that is. America's population will hit that milestone figure tomorrow morning, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's "Population Clock" - quite an achievement considering it's only been a country for 230 years. Think about it: more than 300 million served - maybe not to their total satisfaction, maybe not without a wait - but, hey, that's life in a fast-food nation. Next, please ... Welcome to America. We're glad you're here. May I take your order, please?
NEWS
June 16, 2006
TV PICK--Newton's Dark Secrets-- A look at the manuscripts of Sir Isaac Newton. (MPT, Tuesday, 8 p.m.)
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