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By David Zurawik | September 24, 2002
Amid all the talk of new series, it is easy to forget about the old. One of the oldest network series, NYPD Blue, returns for another season tonight, and I am happy to report there is still much life in this venerable cop drama from Steven Bochco. The secret of success for NYPD Blue is a simple one: Stick with Sipowicz - Dennis Franz's Detective Andy Sipowicz, every bit as much a television classic as any of the great British detectives like Inspector Morse. Enjoy him now, because we are really going to miss this guy when he's gone.
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By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 26, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Andy Sipowicz doesn't want to die. More precisely, Dennis Franz, who has played the ornery detective for 11 seasons on NYPD Blue, doesn't want him to die. NYPD Blue will end its ABC run this coming season. There's a slim chance it could get an 11th-hour reprieve, according to new ABC Entertainment President Steve McPherson. "But right now, we're really planning on making this a fantastic season to send the show off." This is fine with Franz. "I'm ready ... for the show to end. I'm ready for Sipowicz to end."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 26, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Coming this fall from ABC, one of the networks that says it plans to clean up its act on TV violence, is Steven Bochco's "NYPD Blue." The show includes scenes such as this:A man and a woman are on a bed in a hotel room starting to have intercourse. The man is a cop, the woman a prostitute.Another man walks into the room, points a gun, and suddenly everything starts to look like a Sam Peckinpah movie with slow motion and silence as the shooter pumps five slugs into the cop.The scene ends with the cop lying face down on the bed in his underwear, blood running down his legs.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | September 24, 2002
Amid all the talk of new series, it is easy to forget about the old. One of the oldest network series, NYPD Blue, returns for another season tonight, and I am happy to report there is still much life in this venerable cop drama from Steven Bochco. The secret of success for NYPD Blue is a simple one: Stick with Sipowicz - Dennis Franz's Detective Andy Sipowicz, every bit as much a television classic as any of the great British detectives like Inspector Morse. Enjoy him now, because we are really going to miss this guy when he's gone.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 9, 2001
I must be getting old; I can remember when showing bare behinds on "NYPD Blue" was a big deal. "NYPD Blue" returns tonight for the start of its eighth season, and the hour ends with the bare behinds of two regular cast members. It's no big deal. As much as I loved and still like "NYPD Blue," thanks mainly to Dennis Franz and the character he plays, Detective Andy Sipowicz, I have to admit there is not one new note played in either of the first two episodes I've seen. Tonight's season premiere, which picks up the story line of Internal Affairs investigating the squad of the 15th precinct as to what they knew about the drug dealing of the ex-husband of departed Detective Jill Kirkendall, opens on one of the finest notes the series has ever played: Sipowicz's tenderness toward his son, Theo.
FEATURES
By Gail Shister and Gail Shister,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 5, 1993
Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop."Producers take one look at my face and think 'cop,' " says Dennis Franz of ABC's "NYPD Blue," whose Detective Andy Sipowicz is his 28th police role.Mr. Franz, 48, a burly guy with the look of an unmade bed, knows it's more than just his mug. "Evidently, it's also my attitude and body language -- an always-suspicious, over-the-shoulder way I seem to have about me, when I'm asked to be that way," he said recently in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 13, 1995
Los Angeles -- "NYPD Blue" star Dennis Franz says he knew it wasn't going to be easy replacing David Caruso when his sexy co-star left the ABC hit series for feature films earlier this season."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 21, 1993
Tonight's the night that viewers finally get to see Steven Bochco's "NYPD Blue," the new cop drama that's been debated in the media for the past five months.There has been a lot of manufactured controversy and hype surrounding tonight's premiere, at 10 on WJZ (Channel 13). But it's also genuinely one of the big events of the TV year. It's a moment of true cultural confrontation that will deter- mine to some extent what's acceptable in terms of harsh language and violence on network TV.Viewers have said over and over in recent polls that there's too much violence on TV. Tonight, ABC gives them a program with an excess of violence in it. The Nielsen ratings for "NYPD Blue" should tell us how committed viewers really are to reducing TV violence.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 26, 1997
David who?Remember that guy who used to be on "NYPD Blue," the guy who was supposedly the big breakout star? The guy whose character, Detective John Kelly, was supposed to be the show's moral center? The guy who left the show after one season, deciding that movie marquees were calling?Maybe you don't remember David Caruso, because Jimmy Smits came on board as Bobby Simone in season two, established immediate chemistry with Dennis Franz's Detective Andy Sipowicz and promptly re-established himself as one of the most charismatic stars on TV.Tonight, ABC repeats the second-season opener of "NYPD Blue" (10 p.m.-11 p.m, WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 14, 1994
It only seemed like a silly question.Dennis Franz, who less than 24 hours earlier had won the Emmy as television's best dramatic actor, was asked if he thought viewers would buy into him as a newspaper reporter in "Moment of Truth: Caught in the Crossfire," an NBC made-for-TV movie airing at 8 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2)."I think they will. I believe I've been able to get rid of Sipowicz and that they'll believe this guy is a journalist," Franz said. "But I know what you're asking. I've been typecast pretty good."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 9, 2001
I must be getting old; I can remember when showing bare behinds on "NYPD Blue" was a big deal. "NYPD Blue" returns tonight for the start of its eighth season, and the hour ends with the bare behinds of two regular cast members. It's no big deal. As much as I loved and still like "NYPD Blue," thanks mainly to Dennis Franz and the character he plays, Detective Andy Sipowicz, I have to admit there is not one new note played in either of the first two episodes I've seen. Tonight's season premiere, which picks up the story line of Internal Affairs investigating the squad of the 15th precinct as to what they knew about the drug dealing of the ex-husband of departed Detective Jill Kirkendall, opens on one of the finest notes the series has ever played: Sipowicz's tenderness toward his son, Theo.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 2, 1997
Three repeats offer viewers tonight the chance to relive some of the finest moments from May sweeps one from each of the past three years."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) repeats May's tribute to "Citizen Kane," in which Paul's Uncle Marty (Shecky Greene) dies while being interviewed for the family documentary, but not before uttering some cryptic final words that no one can quite figure out. Other guests include Fred DeCordova, as Hugh Moss, a former business associate of Paul's father, and the great Sid Caesar as Uncle Harold, who thinks he has the answer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 26, 1997
David who?Remember that guy who used to be on "NYPD Blue," the guy who was supposedly the big breakout star? The guy whose character, Detective John Kelly, was supposed to be the show's moral center? The guy who left the show after one season, deciding that movie marquees were calling?Maybe you don't remember David Caruso, because Jimmy Smits came on board as Bobby Simone in season two, established immediate chemistry with Dennis Franz's Detective Andy Sipowicz and promptly re-established himself as one of the most charismatic stars on TV.Tonight, ABC repeats the second-season opener of "NYPD Blue" (10 p.m.-11 p.m, WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 13, 1995
Los Angeles -- "NYPD Blue" star Dennis Franz says he knew it wasn't going to be easy replacing David Caruso when his sexy co-star left the ABC hit series for feature films earlier this season."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 14, 1994
It only seemed like a silly question.Dennis Franz, who less than 24 hours earlier had won the Emmy as television's best dramatic actor, was asked if he thought viewers would buy into him as a newspaper reporter in "Moment of Truth: Caught in the Crossfire," an NBC made-for-TV movie airing at 8 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2)."I think they will. I believe I've been able to get rid of Sipowicz and that they'll believe this guy is a journalist," Franz said. "But I know what you're asking. I've been typecast pretty good."
FEATURES
By Gail Shister and Gail Shister,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 5, 1993
Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop. Cop."Producers take one look at my face and think 'cop,' " says Dennis Franz of ABC's "NYPD Blue," whose Detective Andy Sipowicz is his 28th police role.Mr. Franz, 48, a burly guy with the look of an unmade bed, knows it's more than just his mug. "Evidently, it's also my attitude and body language -- an always-suspicious, over-the-shoulder way I seem to have about me, when I'm asked to be that way," he said recently in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 2, 1997
Three repeats offer viewers tonight the chance to relive some of the finest moments from May sweeps one from each of the past three years."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) repeats May's tribute to "Citizen Kane," in which Paul's Uncle Marty (Shecky Greene) dies while being interviewed for the family documentary, but not before uttering some cryptic final words that no one can quite figure out. Other guests include Fred DeCordova, as Hugh Moss, a former business associate of Paul's father, and the great Sid Caesar as Uncle Harold, who thinks he has the answer.
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 26, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Andy Sipowicz doesn't want to die. More precisely, Dennis Franz, who has played the ornery detective for 11 seasons on NYPD Blue, doesn't want him to die. NYPD Blue will end its ABC run this coming season. There's a slim chance it could get an 11th-hour reprieve, according to new ABC Entertainment President Steve McPherson. "But right now, we're really planning on making this a fantastic season to send the show off." This is fine with Franz. "I'm ready ... for the show to end. I'm ready for Sipowicz to end."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 21, 1993
Tonight's the night that viewers finally get to see Steven Bochco's "NYPD Blue," the new cop drama that's been debated in the media for the past five months.There has been a lot of manufactured controversy and hype surrounding tonight's premiere, at 10 on WJZ (Channel 13). But it's also genuinely one of the big events of the TV year. It's a moment of true cultural confrontation that will deter- mine to some extent what's acceptable in terms of harsh language and violence on network TV.Viewers have said over and over in recent polls that there's too much violence on TV. Tonight, ABC gives them a program with an excess of violence in it. The Nielsen ratings for "NYPD Blue" should tell us how committed viewers really are to reducing TV violence.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 26, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Coming this fall from ABC, one of the networks that says it plans to clean up its act on TV violence, is Steven Bochco's "NYPD Blue." The show includes scenes such as this:A man and a woman are on a bed in a hotel room starting to have intercourse. The man is a cop, the woman a prostitute.Another man walks into the room, points a gun, and suddenly everything starts to look like a Sam Peckinpah movie with slow motion and silence as the shooter pumps five slugs into the cop.The scene ends with the cop lying face down on the bed in his underwear, blood running down his legs.
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