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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - The Boston Red Sox, because they have another game at night in Fort Myers, brought no regulars here for Friday's contest against the Orioles. The Orioles sent starter Miguel Gonzalez to pitch against minor leaguers so he wouldn't face an American League East team. It's typical stuff for mid-March, but the gamesmanship handed lefty Zach Britton a start. And he took advantage of the opportunity in the Orioles' 3-3 tie against the Red Sox. Britton, who is fighting for the fifth starter spot, lasted 3 2/3 scoreless innings, giving up one hit and walking two, with both walks coming in his final frame.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
OAKLAND, Calif. - A day after blowing his third save opportunity of the season in a 5-4, walk-off loss Friday to the Oakland Athletics, Orioles closer Zach Britton wanted to get back on the mound as soon as possible. “I hope we either have a huge lead or I have to opportunity to be out there,” Britton said. “I think the one thing about being a reliever is that you're able to turn the page much quicker. You understand it's one bad inning, and you just kind of move on. You make adjustments, and if the same situation comes in, you know how to attack it differently than I did last night.” Britton failed to retire a batter in the ninth inning, and Oakland won on Josh Donaldson's three-run homer to center field.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
OAKLAND, Calif. - When Zach Britton left the Orioles in March, he felt like he wasn't in a situation in which he could succeed in the majors. The 25-year-old left-hander believed he needed to go the minors and recapture what made him so effective when he first arrived in Baltimore in 2011. For the most part that meant regaining the feel and command of his heavy sinkerball. "I needed to get back to what I did best, throw the sinkerball. And that's what I kind of got back to down at Norfolk," said Britton, who was promoted from Triple-A on Thursday to, at least initially, provide bullpen depth.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
It's just so easy for politicians to repeat what they hear. The recent commentary ("Harbor Point means jobs, inclusion," Aug. 14) by Baltimore City Council President Jack Young is a classic. The constant repeat of "the 7,000 construction jobs and thousands of permanent jobs" has become mind numbing at this point. The 51 percent of new hires from the city is another pearl of wisdom! A healthy level of commercial construction is an important part of any economy, and Harbor Point will create some temporary construction jobs, but new buildings do not create permanent jobs.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Sometime in the very near future, possibly during the 10-game home stand that opens tonight against the Seattle Mariners, Orioles' reliever Gregg Olson will become the youngest pitcher in baseball history to record 100 saves.Of course he's already the youngest to register 98, his currentotal, but that's a technicality. The century mark is a much more exotic number.In addition, before his new beard is fully grown the 25-year-olOlson should surpass the club record of 105 saves set by Tippy Martinez.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 27, 2011
With last night's 4-1 victory over the Red Sox, Orioles starter Zach Britton became the first rookie in franchise history to win four games in April. The 23-year-old allowed one run and five hits in six innings of work, a performance that impressed the guys in the other dugout. Here are a few quotes from Red Sox players who were raving about Britton after last night's game : Designated hitter David Ortiz: "He’s got good stuff. We don’t know the kid, so that makes it even worse.
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- New York Yankees starter Kenny Rogers knew it was a big game.The opener of a series with the second-place Orioles, in front of 34,161 fans at Yankee Stadium.Rogers remained calm, enough, though to give New York 7 2/3 strong innings and pick up his sixth win of the year as the Yankees beat the Orioles, 3-2.Rogers allowed just seven hits and walked only one. He gave up two runs, but shut the Orioles down when they had runners on second and third and just one out in the seventh inning.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
OAKLAND, Calif. - A day after blowing his third save opportunity of the season in a 5-4, walk-off loss Friday to the Oakland Athletics, Orioles closer Zach Britton wanted to get back on the mound as soon as possible. “I hope we either have a huge lead or I have to opportunity to be out there,” Britton said. “I think the one thing about being a reliever is that you're able to turn the page much quicker. You understand it's one bad inning, and you just kind of move on. You make adjustments, and if the same situation comes in, you know how to attack it differently than I did last night.” Britton failed to retire a batter in the ninth inning, and Oakland won on Josh Donaldson's three-run homer to center field.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
BOSTON -- What has made Orioles closer Jim Johnson so good? Well, let's allow his manager and teammates explain the key to Johnson's record-breaking season. Here's what they have to say about Johnson, who set a new Orioles single-season saves mark with his 46 th save. Manager Buck Showalter "He's a pitcher, not a thrower, with good stuff. He's really good. And Jimmy's got a lot of challenges he had behind him. No where along the line did he cheat the process. When Jimmy goes out there on a given day when he's not carrying a certain pitch, he's got three weapons.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
This was Zach Britton's organization before it was Brian Matusz's or Chris Tillman's or Jake Arrieta's. The Orioles' "Big Three" didn't join the franchise until after Britton was picked in the third round (85th overall) of the 2006 amateur draft out of Weatherford (Texas) High. In the club's past nine drafts, the only high school pitchers the Orioles have selected higher than Britton were this year's top pick Matt Hobgood (fifth overall) and Adam Loewen (fourth overall) in 2002. Now that Britton, a 21-year-old left-hander, is establishing himself as one of the organization's best, the man who signed him for $435,000 isn't surprised.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
OAKLAND, Calif. - When Zach Britton left the Orioles in March, he felt like he wasn't in a situation in which he could succeed in the majors. The 25-year-old left-hander believed he needed to go the minors and recapture what made him so effective when he first arrived in Baltimore in 2011. For the most part that meant regaining the feel and command of his heavy sinkerball. "I needed to get back to what I did best, throw the sinkerball. And that's what I kind of got back to down at Norfolk," said Britton, who was promoted from Triple-A on Thursday to, at least initially, provide bullpen depth.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - The Boston Red Sox, because they have another game at night in Fort Myers, brought no regulars here for Friday's contest against the Orioles. The Orioles sent starter Miguel Gonzalez to pitch against minor leaguers so he wouldn't face an American League East team. It's typical stuff for mid-March, but the gamesmanship handed lefty Zach Britton a start. And he took advantage of the opportunity in the Orioles' 3-3 tie against the Red Sox. Britton, who is fighting for the fifth starter spot, lasted 3 2/3 scoreless innings, giving up one hit and walking two, with both walks coming in his final frame.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
BOSTON -- What has made Orioles closer Jim Johnson so good? Well, let's allow his manager and teammates explain the key to Johnson's record-breaking season. Here's what they have to say about Johnson, who set a new Orioles single-season saves mark with his 46 th save. Manager Buck Showalter "He's a pitcher, not a thrower, with good stuff. He's really good. And Jimmy's got a lot of challenges he had behind him. No where along the line did he cheat the process. When Jimmy goes out there on a given day when he's not carrying a certain pitch, he's got three weapons.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 27, 2011
With last night's 4-1 victory over the Red Sox, Orioles starter Zach Britton became the first rookie in franchise history to win four games in April. The 23-year-old allowed one run and five hits in six innings of work, a performance that impressed the guys in the other dugout. Here are a few quotes from Red Sox players who were raving about Britton after last night's game : Designated hitter David Ortiz: "He’s got good stuff. We don’t know the kid, so that makes it even worse.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
This was Zach Britton's organization before it was Brian Matusz's or Chris Tillman's or Jake Arrieta's. The Orioles' "Big Three" didn't join the franchise until after Britton was picked in the third round (85th overall) of the 2006 amateur draft out of Weatherford (Texas) High. In the club's past nine drafts, the only high school pitchers the Orioles have selected higher than Britton were this year's top pick Matt Hobgood (fifth overall) and Adam Loewen (fourth overall) in 2002. Now that Britton, a 21-year-old left-hander, is establishing himself as one of the organization's best, the man who signed him for $435,000 isn't surprised.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | January 13, 2009
I got a prompt recently from Twitter, the micro-blogging Web site, that said I could start receiving updates from Britney Spears' very own Twitter page. And would you look at that: She wished me (and the rest of the world) "Happy Holidays" on Dec. 24. A week before that, it seemed like I was touring Asia with the pop star herself when she tweeted to let me know, "I love Japan! I think all the tiny cars are so cute." At least I think it was the unsinkable Ms. Spears. Now, I can't be so sure.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
MINNEAPOLIS -- Rookie catcher Greg Zaun has been with the Orioles less than a month and he's learning about life in the big leagues. Yesterday, he walked up to a couple of teammates with a burning question."
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Somebody asked Alan Mills, who yesterday became the first Orioles player to appear in camp, if he had thought the strike ever would end."Have you seen that All Sport commercial with Shaq?" Mills said of the drink endorsed by Orlando Magic center Shaquille O'Neal. "I was thinking [during the strike] that's how people would think back on baseball. 'Remember that game, baseball, they used to play with bats and balls and they ran around the bases . . . ?' "Mills was grinning broadly, sweating through his jersey after throwing for Orioles manager Phil Regan and the coaching staff for 15 minutes.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | September 23, 2007
Saying Bernard "Lefty" Kreh has a new book out is like announcing that the sun rose this morning. In addition to being a lecturer and teacher, the Hunt Valley resident is a prolific writer, with hundreds of articles and about two dozen books to his name. This time, Kreh's volume is perfect for rainy days or those soon-to-be-upon-us bitter weeks of winter. Fishing Knots ($25; 128 pages; Stackpole Books) teaches you with diagrams and a DVD how to attach anything to anything. Kreh has picked more than 30 knots and loops to use with a wide variety of line and in lots of situations.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | May 14, 2007
There's scarcely a ripple on the tiny pond tucked behind the strip mall on Route 3 in Crofton. People do their banking, mail their letters and buy their coffee just steps from where, five years ago this week, the saga of Maryland's nastiest fish surfaced on the end of a fishing line. Over the course of several months, the northern snakehead - also called "Frankenfish," "the baddest bunny in the bush" or the "fish from hell" - leaped from the waters of Southeast Asia to the world's headlines to the late-night talk shows.
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