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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 6, 2006
BOSTON -- There are times when political polling reminds me of one of Liz Carpenter's favorite stories. Back in the Carter administration when the indomitable Texan was working on women's rights, she asked a university president how his campus was broken down by sex. "Well, ma'am," he answered thoughtfully, "liquor is more of a problem." Over the years, sexual breakdowns became a regular feature in the polling firmament. The gender gap was discovered and then elevated to a truism, and finally divided into various subsets of the gene pool.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 29, 2014
Last Friday, the White House announced an "It's On Us" initiative aimed at combating sexual assaults on college campuses. I'm all in favor of combating sexual assault, but the first priority in combating a problem is understanding it. That's not the White House's first priority. Roughly six weeks before Election Day, its chief concern is to translate an exciting social media campaign into a get-out-the-vote operation. Accurate statistics are of limited use in that regard because rape and sexual assault have been declining for decades.
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NEWS
By Page Gardner | March 12, 2007
The recent census finding that there are about as many single women as married women nationwide has triggered a flood of speculation about the cultural fallout from this demographic shift. But now that the single woman has officially arrived, the implications are broader than cultural. This emerging majority could have significant influence over America's political future as well. Who, exactly, is she? For starters, most unmarried women don't lead lives straight out of Sex in the City.
NEWS
Susan Cochran | August 25, 2014
On Aug. 26, 1920, Congress certified passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing all women citizens the right to vote. The jubilant day - since proclaimed "Women's Equality Day" - climaxed a long persistent half-century campaign for women's suffrage and led to the creation that year of the League of Women Voters. But equality did not automatically come along with the right to vote. And today, nearly a century later, there is still much work to be done. While significant progress has been made through legislation and court action in reversing laws and practices detrimental to women - including those by banks and lenders denying women mortgages on homes and care loans - inequities remain.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Cohen and Joyce Cohen,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 2003
Owning a second home is typically something couples do. So Anne Waxman knew she was taking an unconventional step when she bought a second home as a single woman. "I always wanted a home in the country," said Waxman, 47, who lives on the West Side of Manhattan. "I didn't do it the way that would be best for me - with a man I'm married to - but I did it." Weeks before Waxman stumbled upon the house - a ramshackle four-bedroom house in East Jewett, N.Y., which she bought five years ago - she had been jarred by her father's sudden death.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2007
Therese Easley fought off nine other bidders to buy her house in Sandtown last year, the first home for the 40-year-old single woman who grew up in a public housing development in East Baltimore. Ann Anderson, at 26, recently closed on her three-bedroom Federal Hill rowhouse, paying for it with 100 percent financing. And Kelly Mulligan, 29, moved into her one-bedroom condominium in Bolton Hill last month, where her mortgage is no more than the rent on her former apartment in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | February 1, 2004
Lane Hodes doesn't mince words. "The 'looking for a husband' concept baffles me." Don't get her wrong. The 26-year-old University of Maryland law student likes men, and she'll probably get married one day. But Hodes, like many unmarried women these days, is enjoying not being in a serious relationship. She didn't wait for a boyfriend to give her jewelry. When her birthday came around, she bought herself a diamond bracelet. And last year, Hodes vacationed in Las Vegas by herself, gambling in the casinos alone.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Sams and Rachel Sams,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 19, 1999
Once upon a time, the shortest distance between a maiden and her castle was a knight in shining armor.Not anymore.Statistics and the observations of people in the real estate and mortgage industries indicate that single women are buying property in record numbers. According to the Census Bureau, 56.9 percent of females living alone in the United States owned homes in 1998, up from 51.8 percent in 1988.That trend has manifested itself in Baltimore and the surrounding area, where many single women are choosing to exercise their growing buying power by purchasing homes.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 3, 2004
THEY CALL it the Sex and the City vote, single women - 22 million of them by some counts - who didn't vote in 2000 and were thought to hold one of the keys to this presidential election. They were supposed to be a target audience for both George Bush and John Kerry, but a particularly important cohort for Kerry, who couldn't seem to get any traction among married women with children, the so-called security moms. But if the candidates were trying to talk to her, Denise Peterson wasn't listening.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2010
Before moving with her boyfriend of three years to a Hampden home this September, Brandy Washington lived with two other women, both young professionals in their 20s, just like her. Delaying marriage is a lifestyle that has suited the 27-year-old. She and her boyfriend wanted to "try things out" and live together before becoming more serious — a far cry from her high-school-sweetheart parents, who married right out of college. Almost all of her peers, Washington said, are living the same way, either with friends or a long-term partner.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
UPDATE: Such a great week for Baltimore singles.  Some love from Zillow, a snugly snow day, and now this: Kiplinger's, a personal finance magazine, says Baltimore is the sixth best city to fly solo. So what makes Charm City so charming for single people?  Here's what Kiplinger's says, "An inflated income can help you stay afloat in this waterfront city. With typical earnings coming in 27.1% higher than the national median, Baltimore residents should be able to handle the above-average living costs.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 15, 2013
My mother went into paid work soon after my father's clothing store was flooded out in a hurricane, almost wiping him out. She had no choice. We needed the money. This was some two decades before a tidal wave of wives and mothers went into paid work. For the relatively few women with four-year college degrees, this change was the consequence of wider educational opportunity and new laws against gender discrimination that opened professions to well-educated women. But the vast majority of women entered the paid workforce because male wages were dropping.
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | November 9, 2012
As if it weren't enough that Lena Dunham, the 26-year-old writing/directing/acting phenom who started a revolution this year with her HBO series "Girls," scored a $3.5-million book deal and has been granted the unofficial but unimpeachable title of "voice of her generation," she also appears to have won the presidential election - or at least to have been one of the driving forces behind the guy who did. In a much-talked-about campaign video for...
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 1, 2012
This is a story about recycling, and how everything is politically charged this election season. My husband carried our newspapers - which, by the way, he believes are hopelessly in the bag for President Barack Obama - to the curb the night before the recycling truck was scheduled. He left them there, not in a recycling bin, but in the cute, little box I keep in the kitchen to hold them. Next morning, the men on the recycling truck took the newspapers - and my cute, little box - and I cursed them.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
Before moving with her boyfriend of three years to a Hampden home this September, Brandy Washington lived with two other women, both young professionals in their 20s, just like her. Delaying marriage is a lifestyle that has suited the 27-year-old. She and her boyfriend wanted to "try things out" and live together before becoming more serious - a far cry from her high-school-sweetheart parents, who married right out of college. Almost all of her peers, Washington said, are living the same way, either with friends or a long-term partner.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2010
Before moving with her boyfriend of three years to a Hampden home this September, Brandy Washington lived with two other women, both young professionals in their 20s, just like her. Delaying marriage is a lifestyle that has suited the 27-year-old. She and her boyfriend wanted to "try things out" and live together before becoming more serious — a far cry from her high-school-sweetheart parents, who married right out of college. Almost all of her peers, Washington said, are living the same way, either with friends or a long-term partner.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 15, 2013
My mother went into paid work soon after my father's clothing store was flooded out in a hurricane, almost wiping him out. She had no choice. We needed the money. This was some two decades before a tidal wave of wives and mothers went into paid work. For the relatively few women with four-year college degrees, this change was the consequence of wider educational opportunity and new laws against gender discrimination that opened professions to well-educated women. But the vast majority of women entered the paid workforce because male wages were dropping.
NEWS
By John Leo | May 9, 1995
DAVID BLANKENHORN has a question: Why isn't there some debate about the fact that American sperm banks sell sperm to single women?As usual, the elite culture in America will hear this question in one way; the rest of the country will hear it differently.Elite response: Here comes another at tack on privacy and individual rights.Rest of the country: Why is it so obvious that a wide-open commercial market in the production of fatherless children is a social good?Mr. Blankenhorn is head of the Institute for American Values in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2007
It may be hard to find a better place for women than Howard County, but a new study of their economic status shows wide earning gaps remain between the genders. Sponsored by the county's Commission for Women, the study, which follows a broader examination of women's status done five years ago, concludes that "women in Howard County enjoy an almost unmatched status in the United States, with a high percentage of women-owned firms ... good wages, low poverty levels and many professionals.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2007
Therese Easley fought off nine other bidders to buy her house in Sandtown last year, the first home for the 40-year-old single woman who grew up in a public housing development in East Baltimore. Ann Anderson, at 26, recently closed on her three-bedroom Federal Hill rowhouse, paying for it with 100 percent financing. And Kelly Mulligan, 29, moved into her one-bedroom condominium in Bolton Hill last month, where her mortgage is no more than the rent on her former apartment in Fells Point.
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