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Single Sex Education

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NEWS
August 20, 1991
The federal judge in Detroit who ordered last week that female children be admitted to an experimental school for boys seems to be operating on the theory that any discrimination is wrong and therefore illegal. That's fallacious law, and fallacious thinking as well.The law does not prohibit all discrimination, only irrational discrimination. And there is rational basis in abundance for the Detroit school authorities to conclude that single-sex schools, staffed primarily by male teachers, could substantially improve the educational performance of inner-city children who see few males in their lives who are worthy of emulation.
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NEWS
By Whitney Ransome | January 23, 2012
Admission offices in Baltimore's private, independent and parochial schools are hives of activity in January as hundreds of decision letters are being prepared to be mailed to families. For those schools offering single-sex education, this year's admission season comes on the heels of an old argument rearing its head in the press. Last fall, an article in the journal Science, "The Pseudoscience of Single Sex Schooling," renewed the debate about the value of single-sex schools, particularly for girls.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 13, 1998
BOSTON -- Have you noticed that the trendiest curriculum for education reformers seems to be astronomy? These days, when politicians try to fix the problem of inadequate or unequal schools, they want to send the girls to P.S. Venus and the boys to P.S. Mars.The growing popularity of sex-segregated schools and classrooms is evidenced everywhere from New York to California. Indeed, in California, where the state is putting serious money into this idea, some of the newly segregated students sounded like gender aliens:One sixth-grade girl entering a new single-sex class said: "Boys are loud and they get all the attention."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
The boys in the seventh-grade classroom wave their hands wildly and squirm in their seats, unable to contain their joy in a competition involving singular and plural nouns. Their teacher seems undaunted by the outbursts of cheering. These are boys, after all. Sometimes they are loud. In a struggling East Baltimore neighborhood, the middle-schoolers have begun their second year at an all-boys charter school whose creation marks a distinct shift in thinking about single-sex education in the public schools.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
The boys in the seventh-grade classroom wave their hands wildly and squirm in their seats, unable to contain their joy in a competition involving singular and plural nouns. Their teacher seems undaunted by the outbursts of cheering. These are boys, after all. Sometimes they are loud. In a struggling East Baltimore neighborhood, the middle-schoolers have begun their second year at an all-boys charter school whose creation marks a distinct shift in thinking about single-sex education in the public schools.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
THE AMERICAN Association of University Women has a knack for riling 'em up.Six years ago, the association took considerable heat when it issued a report documenting the damage done to girls by gender bias in education.Girls are often "shortchanged" in coeducational settings, the report said. The self-esteem of the best female students can be badly damaged.The next year, conservative talk-show hosts went into full voice criticizing another AAUW report, "Hostile Hallways," which described pervasive sexual harassment of girls at all levels of schooling.
NEWS
June 30, 1996
IN SWEEPING away justifications for elite, state-supported, all male military education at Virginia Military Institute, the Supreme Court issued a ringing denunciation of sexual discrimination. By a 7-to-1 majority, the court rejected lower court rulings that accepted a state-funded, less-rigorous program devised for women as an adequate substitute for the exclusion of women at VMI.Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who as a private lawyer successfully argued women's rights cases, wrote for the majority, noting that "estimates of what is appropriate for most women, no longer justify denying opportunity to women whose talent and capacity place them outside the average description."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 1, 1992
The big newspaper ad for one of America's oldest, most prestigious girls' schools made its point most succinctly in the photo caption:"At single-sex schools, girls are the heroes, the problem-solvers, the innovators. All classroom voices are theirs, as are all honors, gavels, and leading roles."The ad, featuring a picture of a confidently smiling young woman, was in a series run in the fall by the Emma Willard School in Troy, N.Y. The series caused a stir in the usually placid world of private institutions because it tweaked some of the school's competitors -- the big-name, one-time boys' schools that have gone coeducational.
NEWS
By Judith Shapiro | November 28, 1994
BY NOW, the benefits of single-sex education for girls and women have been reported so often and so fully that you might think the advocates of women's institutions could snap their briefcases shut and declare the case closed.But we can't.It isn't enough to cite the familiar statistics showing that graduates of women's colleges succeed in traditionally male fields -- business, government, academia -- far out of proportion to their numbers in the population.Unless we understand the reasons for the success of single-sex education for girls and women, we risk missing some important lessons about education, society and the sexes today.
NEWS
August 27, 1991
Let the rules of equality apply to allThe legacy of Stephen Sachs lingers in Maryland. The feminist former attorney general attacked the all-male Burning Tree Club under the state's Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), which was enacted in 1972.While the office of the attorney general attacked all-male institutions, it defended what Rush Limbaugh of the WCBM talk station calls "feminazi" fronts, such as the Maryland Commission for Women.Now the National Organization for Women and its fellow-traveler American Civil Liberties Union have sued the Detroit school system for creating schools exclusively for black males.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
FROM TIME TO TIME, this newspaper and others have published stories about a "new approach" to education in the cities -- all-male schooling. Single-sex classes are said to give young urban boys the identity they lack in a culture dominated by females. Four years ago, on the eve of the Million Man March in Washington, I wrote an Education Beat column about all-boy classes at Matthew A. Henson Elementary School in West Baltimore. They'd been established there in 1987, I wrote. A heavy package arrived recently from Lydell C. Bridgeford.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
THE AMERICAN Association of University Women has a knack for riling 'em up.Six years ago, the association took considerable heat when it issued a report documenting the damage done to girls by gender bias in education.Girls are often "shortchanged" in coeducational settings, the report said. The self-esteem of the best female students can be badly damaged.The next year, conservative talk-show hosts went into full voice criticizing another AAUW report, "Hostile Hallways," which described pervasive sexual harassment of girls at all levels of schooling.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 13, 1998
BOSTON -- Have you noticed that the trendiest curriculum for education reformers seems to be astronomy? These days, when politicians try to fix the problem of inadequate or unequal schools, they want to send the girls to P.S. Venus and the boys to P.S. Mars.The growing popularity of sex-segregated schools and classrooms is evidenced everywhere from New York to California. Indeed, in California, where the state is putting serious money into this idea, some of the newly segregated students sounded like gender aliens:One sixth-grade girl entering a new single-sex class said: "Boys are loud and they get all the attention."
NEWS
By Karen Czapanskiy | July 7, 1996
AH, SAID MANY people with a sense of relief, isn't it wonderful that the Supreme Court came to the right decision in the VMI case? After all its conservative decisions in recent years, the court might have failed to rule that Virginia Military Institute's form of single-sex education is unconstitutional sex discrimination.In the end, however, seven members of the court recognized VMl's claims to be what they were: simply wrong. As my 8-year-old son told me, "Mom, that's simple. The boys just don't want to have girls around.
NEWS
June 30, 1996
IN SWEEPING away justifications for elite, state-supported, all male military education at Virginia Military Institute, the Supreme Court issued a ringing denunciation of sexual discrimination. By a 7-to-1 majority, the court rejected lower court rulings that accepted a state-funded, less-rigorous program devised for women as an adequate substitute for the exclusion of women at VMI.Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who as a private lawyer successfully argued women's rights cases, wrote for the majority, noting that "estimates of what is appropriate for most women, no longer justify denying opportunity to women whose talent and capacity place them outside the average description."
NEWS
By Judith Shapiro | November 28, 1994
BY NOW, the benefits of single-sex education for girls and women have been reported so often and so fully that you might think the advocates of women's institutions could snap their briefcases shut and declare the case closed.But we can't.It isn't enough to cite the familiar statistics showing that graduates of women's colleges succeed in traditionally male fields -- business, government, academia -- far out of proportion to their numbers in the population.Unless we understand the reasons for the success of single-sex education for girls and women, we risk missing some important lessons about education, society and the sexes today.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
FROM TIME TO TIME, this newspaper and others have published stories about a "new approach" to education in the cities -- all-male schooling. Single-sex classes are said to give young urban boys the identity they lack in a culture dominated by females. Four years ago, on the eve of the Million Man March in Washington, I wrote an Education Beat column about all-boy classes at Matthew A. Henson Elementary School in West Baltimore. They'd been established there in 1987, I wrote. A heavy package arrived recently from Lydell C. Bridgeford.
NEWS
May 1, 1992
Single-sex schools no solution"Separate but equal" institutions were once seen as the answer to race relations in the United States. Today, most people see this as no solution at all. The same sort of illogic applies when some educators, citing statistics that young women do better in single-sex schools, use these statistics to advocate single-sex education.I'm not surprised that both girls and boys do better in schools with only girls, or boys; that in both cases the children feel more comfortable about speaking up, that some questions about teacher favoritism are eliminated.
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