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NEWS
By Barbara Ransby | April 29, 1994
WHEN 19 poor children were found living in cramped and squalid conditions on Keystone Avenue in Chicago last February, America took notice. The media quickly indicted the parents, and the Keystone 19 became a symbol of what's wrong with the black urban poor in this country. But the case was also distorted in the media spotlight, raising serious questions about poverty and the villainous stereotype of poor black women.The Keystone parents were tried last week on a variety of charges. Five of the six mothers and a boyfriend were found guilty of child neglect and endangerment and face up to a year in jail each.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
On the day before graduating from Howard Community College, Jennie Wang of Columbia considered the arduous road she had traveled and her studies at the Johns Hopkins University that lie ahead. One thought came to mind: "If my Hammond High School teachers could see me now ... " "If they [discover] I'm going to Johns Hopkins, they're going to be like, 'What? Jennie Wang? Really?' In high school, I was the worst student ever," said Wang, 22, who also became pregnant shortly after graduating from high school, leaving her estranged from her parents, who immigrated to the U.S. with her from China when she was 10. Determined to dispel stigmas attached to young single mothers, Wang excelled at HCC, eventually becoming student government president and vice president of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor society for students at two-year colleges.
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BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | April 6, 1992
Tara Stephens, 20, graduated from high school with honors and won a full academic scholarship to Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio.But the same year, she became pregnant with her daughter, Andrianna."
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2011
After he and his wife separated in 2007, Bruce Jordan, 37, entered a long custody battle for one of their children, Matthew, an active 7-year-old who loves watching "SpongeBob SquarePants" and other cartoons. The father of seven children in all, Jordan, who lives in East Baltimore, says he felt he had been too absent from the lives of his other kids. "As far as my son, I wanted to make a difference," Jordan said on a recent afternoon, clutching a water bottle and looking relaxed in a Nike T-shirt and jeans.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | February 14, 1993
Are you the mother of young children? Are you going through a divorce? And are friends and relatives suggesting that you will need to make drastic changes in your housing arrangements?Then don't let them shape your plans, counsels Ruth Rejnis, the author of several books on real estate, including one for single parents.Ms. Rejnis contends that real estate agents -- now mostly women -- have stopped stereotyping women customers. But there's still a danger that a newly single mother will be pushed in particular directions by supposed allies, the author says.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Bonnie Miller Rubin and Dahleen Glanton and Bonnie Miller Rubin,Chicago Tribune | December 17, 2006
Kimberly Dearth's biological clock was beginning to tick pretty loudly. So when she discovered she was pregnant, she had no problem putting diapers before a diamond ring. "It was unplanned but not unwelcome," said Dearth, 37, who is raising her 15-month-old daughter, Samantha, as a single mother. "Two different doctors told me that I would need fertility treatments. So when I found out that I was pregnant, I was shocked, I was frightened, but I was also very happy." Dearth, a medical assistant from Cedar Lake, Ind., is among a growing number of women over the age of 35 - when fertility rates begin to steeply decline - to become single mothers.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
It's a small program with a large aim: to give homeless families shelter and single mothers the survival skills to stay off welfare.Fresh Start, a 9-month old experiment in teaching self-reliance, is a joint effort involving Catholic, Jewish and black charities, local schools and business owners. Its mission is to give nine single mothers a chance to start their lives over.In an age of welfare reform, supporters hope this program will provide a model for breaking the cycle of welfare dependency.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
On the day before graduating from Howard Community College, Jennie Wang of Columbia considered the arduous road she had traveled and her studies at the Johns Hopkins University that lie ahead. One thought came to mind: "If my Hammond High School teachers could see me now ... " "If they [discover] I'm going to Johns Hopkins, they're going to be like, 'What? Jennie Wang? Really?' In high school, I was the worst student ever," said Wang, 22, who also became pregnant shortly after graduating from high school, leaving her estranged from her parents, who immigrated to the U.S. with her from China when she was 10. Determined to dispel stigmas attached to young single mothers, Wang excelled at HCC, eventually becoming student government president and vice president of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor society for students at two-year colleges.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 2000
WASHINGTON - For the first time in over a decade, single mothers are more likely than married mothers to be employed, new government statistics show. The figures also show a large increase in the proportion of single mothers who are working, with explosive growth in work by low-wage women with children born out of wedlock. Economists also say there is a large increase in the number of working single mothers who have never been married. In 1993, 44 percent of them were employed. The figure shot up to 65 percent last year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
LaKeisha Smith is 28, a temporary medical assistant in East Baltimore who is trying to provide a proper life and a home for her three kids. But she has never been married, and it is a struggle. "When my daughter needs shoes, I take money off my gas and electric bills," she says. "I wash clothes, I make dinner, I do homework with them, I mop the floors ... when they're in bed. At night, I sometimes just want to sit and cry." A "demographic profile" of Marylanders, released today by the U.S. Census Bureau, shows that more than 34,000 households in Baltimore, or 13.3 percent, are headed by women raising their children without a husband present.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
When Barack Obama was elected president, some credit was given to what pundits called the "Cosby Factor." The 1980s television show about an African-American family with a doctor dad and a lawyer mom, who were raising a rambunctious brood with a firm but loving hand, supposedly made it easier for white America to accept the Obamas, an African-American family with a lawyer dad and a lawyer mom, raising a couple of rambunctious daughters with a...
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
It's said that the first step toward fixing a problem is recognizing you have one. So when the producers of the TV show "Making Over America" needed a subject for an August episode, they stumbled upon gold in LaShunda Rodgers, an Army staff sergeant and self-described "crazy person" based at Fort Meade. The cheerful Rodgers, who was getting ready to turn 30 this year, had a feeling her style of dress was less than appropriate for her status as a maturing single mother. The show "sent an e-mail to every female stationed at Fort Meade, asking us to describe our style problems, what was in our closets and other things," says Rodgers, an Iraq war veteran who teaches multimedia illustration on the base.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
Tanya Lawson's brightly painted orange fingernails glide along the keyboard, tap-tap-tapping under the fluorescent perma-glow of the NeighborCare pharmacy data processing center. Lawson, 43, handles one billing claim after another from a lonely cubicle by the wall. About the only other sound is the gurgle and hiss of the fax machine spitting out more prescriptions. It's Monday at 5:30 a.m., and Howard County is just waking up under a streaky graphite sky. Lawson, on the job four hours already, has barely begun her workday.
NEWS
By Katie McMinn Campbell and Will Marshall | November 6, 2007
For all his talk of "compassionate conservatism," President Bush has done remarkably little to empower America's poor. What a contrast with his predecessor, Bill Clinton, who radically reformed welfare, moved millions of people off the dole and into jobs, and made a serious dent in poverty. The Bush administration's inaction leaves it to America's next president to pick up where Mr. Clinton left off. But while Mr. Clinton's reforms encouraged welfare recipients - mostly single mothers with children - to work, it's time to focus on the other side of the poverty equation: the men who father their children.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Bonnie Miller Rubin and Dahleen Glanton and Bonnie Miller Rubin,Chicago Tribune | December 17, 2006
Kimberly Dearth's biological clock was beginning to tick pretty loudly. So when she discovered she was pregnant, she had no problem putting diapers before a diamond ring. "It was unplanned but not unwelcome," said Dearth, 37, who is raising her 15-month-old daughter, Samantha, as a single mother. "Two different doctors told me that I would need fertility treatments. So when I found out that I was pregnant, I was shocked, I was frightened, but I was also very happy." Dearth, a medical assistant from Cedar Lake, Ind., is among a growing number of women over the age of 35 - when fertility rates begin to steeply decline - to become single mothers.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | December 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a world of uncertainty and mayhem, one constant about which we thought we could be reasonably confident has been that mothers would nurture their children. We have been disabused of that quaint notion in myriad ways, but nowhere so vividly as in today's military. As a spate of recent news stories reveals, the Pentagon has become complicit in helping thousands of mothers abandon and potentially make orphans of their children. Since 2002, about 16,000 single mothers have served in Afghanistan and Iraq.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
As part of the federal drive to transform welfare, Baltimore County this summer will open five employment offices for the poor and is retraining social services employees to work as job search counselors.The five offices -- funded through $1.1 million in savings from declining welfare rolls -- will open near welfare offices in Catonsville, Towson, Reisterstown, Essex and Dundalk.The idea is to provide aggressive employment services for the roughly 3,700 adult cash welfare recipients -- typically single mothers -- who are employable.
NEWS
By Nina Bernstein and Nina Bernstein,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 2001
Four years after the national overhaul of welfare, economists and welfare researchers are questioning some of the truisms of its shrinking rolls, including the belief that people who got off the rolls were the ones best prepared to work and that the caseload increases that inspired the overhaul were caused by a rising number of single mothers on relief. An analysis of several studies suggests that the women who have been most likely to leave the welfare rolls include many with difficulties - such as with serious health problems - that make them more likely to be thrown off for violating stricter rules, Robert A. Moffitt, a professor of economics at the Johns Hopkins University, said at a recent conference of welfare researchers and economists sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 15, 2005
How high do you think Fantasia Barrino's "self-esteem" is now? Ms. Barrino - simply "Fantasia" to her cult of adoring fans - won the American Idol competition two years ago. Since then she has had several hit records and achieved superstar status. Alas, one of those songs was called "Baby Mama," Fantasia's paean to single mothers. That included those single mothers who are divorced or widowed. It includes those single mothers who are being good mommies and are involved with their children's education and crack the whip whenever the young 'uns get out of line.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | July 3, 2005
Meka Payne is living her own worst-case scenario. As she struggles under the weight of nearly $30,000 in debt and income that doesn't meet her expenses, the 24-year-old single mom's rent is soaring 29 percent next month. Even if she could scrape together enough money to pay for a move to a cheaper place, chances are slim that a landlord would agree to a lease after looking at her credit report. If she stays, the added living expense could push her into bankruptcy. "You can't afford to move and you can't afford to stay," said Catherine Williams, a veteran debt counselor tapped by Money Makeover to help Payne chart a new course.
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