Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSingle Member Districts
IN THE NEWS

Single Member Districts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 7, 1991
From: John LeopoldFormer memberMaryland General AssemblyFifteen years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a tragically misguided decision that has given protection to the polluting effect of money in election campaigns. The court ruled that federal statutory ceilings on campaigns violated the First Amendment's guarantee of free expression. It was a victory for concentrated wealth and the drowning of the voices of individual citizens in election campaigns.The Supreme Court ruling made it clear that a state legislature cannot place statutory limits on campaign spending unless those limits are tied to public financing of state election campaigns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Eastern Shore's civil rights history is not a happy one. From the lynchings of the 1930s to the Cambridge riots of the 1960s, the Shore has struggled with race relations. Much of that is in the past - although perhaps not entirely. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, civil rights groups used federal Voting Rights Act lawsuits (or in some cases, the threat of them) to convince towns and counties with large black populations to create voting districts with majority-minority populations.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans and Ginger Thompson | November 6, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke cruised to a second term in yesterday's Baltimore general election, winning a lopsided victory over Republican challenger Samuel A. Culotta.The major ballot question of the day, a proposed charter amendment calling for election of City Council members from 18 single-member districts, failed decisively.Meanwhile, Mary Pat Clarke, who returned from political oblivion four years ago to become City Council president, zoomed to a second term over Republican Anthony D. Cobb.
NEWS
By Jamie Raskin and Rob Richie | November 7, 2011
The battle over legislative redistricting in Maryland provides only the latest evidence of the failure of winner-take-all congressional elections in single-member districts. In these districts huge numbers of people will, by design, vote regularly for losing candidates and be left feeling that they are without meaningful political representation. As everyone knows, single-member districts are a standing invitation to computer-facilitated partisan gerrymandering, a process that has turned ferocious all over America.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
If the Mount Royal Democratic Club is any bellwether, candidates for City Council in 1995 will run in single-member districts.Mount Royal last night overwhelmingly endorsed a proposed City Charter amendment -- Question L on the Nov. 5 general election ballot -- that would create 18 single-member councilmanic districts.L Currently, the charter requires six, three-member districts."One of the problems with the current setup is that your three district council representatives can pass the buck between them," said Craig Muller, an attorney and club member.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Jeff Barker and Michael Dresser and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
MONTGOMERY County Executive Douglas M. Duncan stepped into a political minefield last week when he urged the governor's redistricting commission to draw single-member districts to make it easier for minorities in his increasingly diverse jurisdiction to win seats in the House of Delegates. The Democratic executive's proposal was an issue because it seemed to echo the state Republican Party's drive for three single-member subdistricts in each of the state's 47 Senate districts. Michael A. Steele, state GOP chairman, presented his party's proposal for 141 individual districts statewide as a way to increase minority representation in the legislature.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
A referendum effort to reduce the size of the Baltimore City Council by half has failed by about 1,200 signatures, ensuring that the council will remain at 19 members - at least for now. City Council President Sheila Dixon is expected to announce today the formation of the President's Advisory Commission on Council Representation to study whether the size of the council should be reduced for the first time since 1967. Two weeks ago, the League of Women Voters in Baltimore turned in 11,030 signatures of city residents supporting its call for a referendum on reducing the size of the council to nine single-member districts.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
The League of Women Voters in Baltimore wants a November voter referendum that would cut the size of the City Council by half, creating nine single-member districts. Two similar drives to establish 18 single-member districts failed in 1984 and most recently in 1991, when the issue lost by 8,000 votes. But Millie Tyssowski, president of the civic group that is organizing the drive to obtain 10,000 signatures by August, says the time is ripe. Six three-member council districts have existed since 1967, despite the city population dropping by 250,000 residents.
NEWS
October 17, 1991
The indomitable city GOP chairman, David Blumberg, believes that the people of Baltimore simply have lost touch with the City Council. "Single-member districts," he says, "would make council members more accountable to the people they are supposed to represent."That, in a nutshell, is the argument for approving Question L, the charter amendment proposal which will appear on November's ballot aimed at replacing Baltimore's present system of six three-member City Council districts with 18 single-member districts.
NEWS
October 26, 1991
Ever since 1923, Baltimore has had an unusual multi-member district system for choosing its City Council. Voters in each of the six districts elect three council members; the City Council president is chosen by a city-wide vote.Over the years, attempts to change this arrangement have failed. The city is now the only subdivision in the state that has such a multi-member arrangement. It is the only big-city government in the country without single-member districts.Referendum Question L in the Nov. 5 election asks city voters to create 18 single-member districts in place of the current six districts with three council members each.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | April 2, 2007
Baltimore's City Council, a body known more for tedium than turnover, is attracting an unusually large field of candidates in the months leading up to the election, suggesting that some of the most interesting local political contests this year might take place in the shadow of the mayor's race. And no matter how city residents vote in the Sept. 11 Democratic primary - the election that generally decides who wins in Baltimore - almost a third of the 15-member council will change this year.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Laura Vozzella and Doug Donovan and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
For the newly elected, all-Democrat City Council, defeating the competition in last week's election was the easy part. Now the real politics begins. A three-way competition for council vice president. Jockeying for committee appointments. The potential return of old rivalries. And coalition-building across the unfamiliar territory of a reconfigured council. Just days after the election and with a month to go before the new members take office in a smaller, reshaped council, power plays are under way. Councilmen Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Robert W. Curran are seeking to become council vice president under President Sheila Dixon - even though the incumbent, Stephanie C. Rawlings Blake, has no plans to step aside.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
Stuck at a long red light on his way to a Christmas party eight years ago, City Councilman Nicholas C. D'Adamo Jr. started stewing over a political problem and solved it before he stepped on the gas. A dozen people were vying to fill a vacant seat in D'Adamo's council district, none appealing to him. But he had to back someone for the post. As his car idled at Hamilton Avenue and Harford Road, D'Adamo suddenly thought of a community activist he knew he would see at the party: Lois A. Garey.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2003
The City Council casts its final vote today on one of the most radical overhauls of Baltimore's political landscape in more than 30 years. With Mayor Martin O'Malley needing 10 votes, a simple majority, to pass his plan for shrinking the size of the council, many political observers said the vote is just a formality. O'Malley's plan, they said, was tacitly approved since he introduced it two months ago, a credit to his deft political skill at appeasing enough council members to assure easy passage.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
Residents from neighborhoods split into different election districts under Mayor Martin O'Malley's redistricting plan asked City Council members last night to help keep their communities together. At a public forum before the council's redistricting committee, about 20 residents from Original Northwood, Harlem Park, Darley Park and Washington Village asked the council to reject the mayor's map and draft one that provides them with a single council representative, not two. "Two council representatives dilute our voice," said Frank Gorman, of the Original Northwood Association.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley submitted a plan yesterday that significantly reshapes the City Council for the first time in decades, a map that threatens to pit incumbents against one another, is likely to disrupt neighborhood alliances and creates the rare chance for a Republican to be elected to the council. At a news conference yesterday, O'Malley reiterated his opposition to shrinking the council from six three-member districts to a setup mandated by voters in November that establishes 14 single-member districts.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | March 29, 1991
The most vaunted promise made by the backers of Baltimore's new redistricting plan was that it would vastly increase the political representation of the city's minorities.When it comes to the city's most ignored minority -- the Republican Party -- it is probably a hollow claim.True, GOP officials say, the new plan reshapes Baltimore's councilmanic districts in a way that gives blacks solid majorities in all but one district. But, because the plan retains multiple-member districts, says David R. Blumberg, chairman of the Baltimore Republican Party, it prolongs a fundamentally unfair system that will leave portions of the city underrepresented on the City Council.
NEWS
By Vaughn Paul Deckret | October 15, 1991
ON Nov. 5, city voters will have the opportunity to establish a new arrangement for the election of their City Council. Question L, a proposal on the ballot, would create 18 single-member districts in place of the current scheme of six districts with three council members each.Single-member districts are not new, legally controversial, or, in fact, unusual. Every major county in Maryland has single-member districts, all with the editorial blessings of The Evening Sun. They are in almost every major American city.
NEWS
November 10, 2002
BALTIMORE'S CITY Council has apparently learned nothing from the Nov. 5 election. Instead of trying to figure out how to best carry out the voters' resounding mandate to downsize the bloated body, incumbents are talking about self-preservation through settling petty scores. This is shameful -- but fully in keeping with the shortsighted way in which the council has conducted its business. "It may be even bloodier than last time," Council President Sheila Dixon says of the redistricting process.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
Baltimoreans voted overwhelmingly to reshape the City Council yesterday, handing a final defeat to a group of city leaders who had been outmaneuvered by a scrappy community-labor coalition and stymied by the state's highest court. "Baltimore has clearly chosen that we should move forward," said Sultan Shakir, an activist with the community group ACORN, which backed ballot Question P. The measure, which passed by a nearly 2-1 margin, cuts four seats from the 19-member council and does away with multimember districts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.