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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 14, 2012
SINGAPORE -- While the U.S. unemployment rate "dropped" to 7.7 percent last month -- a figure even The Washington Post acknowledged was due "in large part because the labor force fell by 350,000" -- here in this modern and prosperous city-state of slightly more than 5 million people, unemployment is practically nonexistent. A taxi driver tells me, "Everyone here works. " With unemployment at an astonishingly low 1.9 percent, he is nearly right. In part, this is due to a work ethic that seems to be in the genes here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
The former Baltimore journalist Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan is a fashionista who doubtless looks pulled-together even when she's sick in bed, a woman with a taste for Narciso Rodriguez gowns and Manolo Blahnik shoes. She also delights in fine food and wine - even if she is slender as a model, and even though she adopted a guise of determined ineptitude in her first book, "A Tiger in the Kitchen," which describes her attempts to learn to prepare the dishes of her native Singapore. But Cheryl Tan, noir connoisseur?
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NEWS
January 22, 1995
Singapore's top court last week fined the writer, editor and publishers of an article for contempt for "analyzing the Singapore judiciary." The offending phrase: Some Asian countries have a "compliant judiciary to bankrupt opposition politicians."The editor testified he thought the comment was about China. The writer, long gone, won't pay and won't return. The International Herald Tribune can afford the $3,448 fine against the editor and smaller fines against others.This has a chilling effect on the press catering to the Asian market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Now you see him, now you don't. At the start of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's season, its former assistant concertmaster, Igor Yuzefovich, one of the ensemble's most dynamic players, was back onstage after a stint as concertmaster of the Hong Kong Philharmonic for about a season and a half. It looked for a moment like he might be back to stay, especially given that he was also expected to perform on the Music in the Valley concert series a couple weeks ago with his old chamber group, the Monument Piano Trio.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Though 99 percent of Singapore's students pass national exams, a delegation of the city-state's educators recently traveled the globe to Anne Arundel County schools to learn innovative ways to help the other 1 percent succeed. Five educators from the Assumption Pathway School and Children-At-Risk-Empowerment (CARE) in Singapore visited classes at Lindale Middle School in Linthicum this month as part of a two-week tour of facilities in the state. They spoke with local school officials about organization, teaching strategies and assistance for at-risk students.
NEWS
September 13, 1995
Singapore's role as a communications center in Asia is likely to suffer from its long campaign to control what the outside world hears and knows about its institutions. Even with Hong Kong succumbing to China's rule in two years, Singapore is merely convenient and not indispensable as an entrepot for the written and spoken English word in business and news communications.For the second time this year, a Singapore court has penalized the International Herald Tribune for mild comment about Singapore's political affairs.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 7, 2006
Harrah's Entertainment Inc., the world's biggest casino-operator by sales, and partner Keppel Land Ltd. have scrapped a joint proposal to build and operate Singapore's second casino-resort, leaving three bidders for the project. "We determined it would not be possible to deliver a development on the scale we envisioned for Sentosa island while meeting our objectives for this project," the companies said in a joint statement yesterday. Harrah's, which received a $15.1 billion takeover offer from Apollo Management and Texas Pacific Group on Monday, was competing with Kerzner International Ltd., owner of the Atlantis resort in the Bahamas, Malaysia's Genting Berhad and Eighth Wonder in Las Vegas to develop the second casino in Singapore, which wants to double its tourist arrivals to 17 million by 2015.
NEWS
By LINDA L.S. SCHULTE | May 5, 1992
At last, a country has stepped to the forefront and stated that it places great value on the lives of its countrymen. Singapore it was that announced tightened entrance restrictions and a tougher gum-control law.I say it's about time.Mandating gum control (as we know so well in this country) is a difficult subject.It hits at the very heart of individual taste.It hits almost every citizen right in their pockets (or in some cases) purses.I personally was brought up knowing how to handle gum. I've always respected it and felt that if someone was taught the basics of handling a stick properly, then people could live safely with gums of all kinds.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Kevin Doxzen Jr. applied last summer for a Fulbright scholarship to do cancer research in Singapore, and by December he was told he was a finalist. For about five months, he heard nothing, even as many of his classmates were notified of their status. The Johns Hopkins University graduate put together a backup plan that on the surface sounded equally enticing: working at a lab at Yale University studying cancer genes. In May, the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board notified him that he had been awarded the nine-month study grant, and Doxzen was relieved he didn't have to resort to Plan B. "The pay [to study at Yale]
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 14, 2012
SINGAPORE -- While the U.S. unemployment rate "dropped" to 7.7 percent last month -- a figure even The Washington Post acknowledged was due "in large part because the labor force fell by 350,000" -- here in this modern and prosperous city-state of slightly more than 5 million people, unemployment is practically nonexistent. A taxi driver tells me, "Everyone here works. " With unemployment at an astonishingly low 1.9 percent, he is nearly right. In part, this is due to a work ethic that seems to be in the genes here.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Though 99 percent of Singapore's students pass national exams, a delegation of the city-state's educators recently traveled the globe to Anne Arundel County schools to learn innovative ways to help the other 1 percent succeed. Five educators from the Assumption Pathway School and Children-At-Risk-Empowerment (CARE) in Singapore visited classes at Lindale Middle School in Linthicum this month as part of a two-week tour of facilities in the state. They spoke with local school officials about organization, teaching strategies and assistance for at-risk students.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Kevin Doxzen Jr. applied last summer for a Fulbright scholarship to do cancer research in Singapore, and by December he was told he was a finalist. For about five months, he heard nothing, even as many of his classmates were notified of their status. The Johns Hopkins University graduate put together a backup plan that on the surface sounded equally enticing: working at a lab at Yale University studying cancer genes. In May, the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board notified him that he had been awarded the nine-month study grant, and Doxzen was relieved he didn't have to resort to Plan B. "The pay [to study at Yale]
SPORTS
February 24, 2011
While most of golf's focus this week is on the WGC Match Play, the LPGA's Yani Tseng has a white-hot streak going on the women's side. A victory at this week's HSBC Women's Champions in Singapore would be No. 1 Tseng's fifth straight to begin 2011 — a run touching four countries and three tours but mostly outside the U.S. spotlight. The LPGA record for consecutive victories is the five of Nancy Lopez in 1978 and Annika Sorenstam in 2004-05. "(Tseng) definitely has been playing great," Cristie Kerr said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
A federal jury in Baltimore found a Singapore citizen guilty Monday of conspiring to support a terrorist organization that wanted to ship American-made weaponry to rebels trying to overthrow the Sri Lankan government. The Maryland U.S. attorney's office, which announced the conviction, said that Balraj Naidu, 48, and other conspirators tried to buy high-tech weapons on behalf of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. One such deal was orchestrated in Baltimore by undercover agents, who took an arms broker to a Harford County firing range so he could test out the weapons.
BUSINESS
By Julie Johnsson | October 26, 2007
SYDNEY, Australia -- They started lining up at 4:15 a.m. at deserted Singapore Changi Airport, 45 minutes before the ticket counters opened and four hours before the hulking jet would glide into the morning sky. They came from all around the world, all walks of life, drawn by the chance to be the first paying passengers to fly on the first all-new jumbo jet to be developed in decades - and maybe the last. They splurged, from Julian Hayward, who ponied up $100,380 to win the first suite auctioned on the flight, to Artemis Shamari, who paid nearly $4,000 to claim a seat made available by a late cancellation.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 16, 2007
TOULOUSE, France -- There were no Jacuzzis or bowling alleys. No casinos or gyms. But the chilled bottle of champagne perched on an elegantly laid-out double bed said it all. Singapore Airlines introduced the interior of its first A380 superjumbo jet in an elaborate ceremony here yesterday, bringing an end to a decade of anticipation over what the airline has said would be a vast change in the level of quality and comfort in long-haul air travel....
NEWS
August 15, 2007
Stock markets all over have been rocked in the past fortnight by mounting concerns over the United States' subprime mortgage crisis, with the Singapore market losing some $50 billion of its market capitalization in 10 days. Volatility has shot up and central banks have had to intervene, injecting large doses of cash into markets last Friday to prop up confidence and stave off a market crash. Hopes are now high that the U.S. Federal Reserve - whose loose monetary policies earlier this decade were arguably the source of the problem - will now cut its short-term interest rates and ease the pressure in credit markets, possibly within the next fortnight.
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