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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | June 16, 1992
OCEAN CITY -- The state's plans to protect threatened birds in Sinepuxent Bay have ruffled the feathers of town officials, who are concerned about the loss of a recreational area for boaters.To protect the nesting and feeding areas of birds like the piping plover, royal tern and black skimmer, the Natural Resources Department will ban boating near 'skimmer' islands near the Route 50 bridge in the bay and along Assateague's northern bay shoreline beginning July 1.The "emergency" ban, which will remain in effect until September, also will prohibit human intrusion in those areas, DNR officials said.
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SPORTS
August 20, 2011
Ocean City Located near the Fager's Island pier (Route 90 bridge and 60th Street on the bay side), sunset rides accompanied to 1812 Overture as well as daytime yoga classes. Operated out of Fager's Island Bar and Grille. Solomons Island A flat water race was held there in June along the Back Creeks of Solomons, the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. Annapolis Standup Paddle Annapolis (supnnaapolis.com) run events and outings in the Severn and Magothy rivers as well as in the Chesapeake.
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SPORTS
August 20, 2011
Ocean City Located near the Fager's Island pier (Route 90 bridge and 60th Street on the bay side), sunset rides accompanied to 1812 Overture as well as daytime yoga classes. Operated out of Fager's Island Bar and Grille. Solomons Island A flat water race was held there in June along the Back Creeks of Solomons, the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. Annapolis Standup Paddle Annapolis (supnnaapolis.com) run events and outings in the Severn and Magothy rivers as well as in the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Maryland's coastal bays, the inland waterways that cradle the state's Atlantic beach resort, remain in better shape overall than the Chesapeake Bay, according to their latest ecological report card released Wednesday. But beneath that good news lurks a troubling trend. The shallow estuaries behind Ocean City and Assateague Island rated a C+ overall in 2009, the same grade they received for 2008. There were some signs of improvement in the most degraded areas — the northern bays and western tributaries — offset by continuing declines in water quality in Chincoteague Bay, the largest and least developed of the entire inland bay system.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | January 6, 1992
At least a dozen wild ponies at Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland that drowned in the weekend storm were trapped on a narrow, unprotected spit of sand, the National Park Service says."
BUSINESS
By Gary Hornbacher and Gary Hornbacher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 1999
To many people, South Point is just a road on Maryland's Eastern Shore that forks to the right as Route 611 veers left and passes over Sinepuxent Bay on the bridge to Assateague Island National Seashore.But to Bob and Carol Wilson, South Point is more than a road -- it's a small, sheltered peninsular community that seems transported back to another time.It's also where the couple has taken residence in a prefabricated home that began its life in a Nanticoke manufacturing facility.Mr. Wilson, a chief human resources officer at the Johns Hopkins University, and Mrs. Wilson, who worked part-time for a Towson-based law firm, felt drawn to the Eastern Shore when they were considering retirement.
NEWS
October 3, 1996
MARYLAND'S shallow coastal bays are a fragile treasure, an important nursery of fish and crabs. There's little dispute of their ecological value, even while greater protection efforts have long focused on the main Chesapeake estuary.So it's disturbing that federal officials are taking the lead in trying to halt the degradation of Sinepuxent Bay by a shoreline developer, while the Maryland Department of the Environment repeats its compliant refrain: the developer was doing everything he was asked to do.According to the Army Corps of Engineers, however, the developer of the golf course and subdivision near Ocean City had failed to protect the underwater grasses -- required by his permit -- while bulldozing the shoreline and creating heavy erosion and runoff into the bay.It took the personal intervention of Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, at the request of alarmed environmentalists and the National Park Service, that brought regulatory authorities to the construction site last month and got an agreement from developer Tom Ruark to stem the flow of mud into the bay immediately.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2004
Maryland's coastal bays are home to stable populations of crabs, clams and even the once-rare scallop, a report released yesterday shows. But it says the waters around Ocean City remain vulnerable to shoreline development and a growing population. The report, a multiagency effort led by the nonprofit Maryland Coastal Bays Program and the state Department of Natural Resources, is the first of its kind to focus on the five coastal bays, whose health has not been studied nearly as much as that of the Chesapeake Bay. And while the coastal bays are in less dire straits than the Chesapeake, those who live and work along the coast say that doesn't give them much comfort.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
SOUTH POINT -- From her back yard, Phyllis Koenings has a panoramic view of one of the last nearly pristine stretches of Maryland's coastal bays. Soon, though, Koenings will have to share her vista of waterfowl winging across the sparkling water. Just a brisk walk from the two-story Colonial where she has lived since 1993, bulldozers have cut roads through woods so 32 homes can be built. For those who can afford it, waterfront lots are going for $475,000 each. The housing project, subdivided and recorded in the Worcester County land office nearly 12 years ago, highlights the hurdles facing state and local officials as they move in an awkward partnership to curb development pressure that threatens the five ecologically fragile coastal bays.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Maryland's coastal bays, the inland waterways that cradle the state's Atlantic beach resort, remain in better shape overall than the Chesapeake Bay, according to their latest ecological report card released Wednesday. But beneath that good news lurks a troubling trend. The shallow estuaries behind Ocean City and Assateague Island rated a C+ overall in 2009, the same grade they received for 2008. There were some signs of improvement in the most degraded areas — the northern bays and western tributaries — offset by continuing declines in water quality in Chincoteague Bay, the largest and least developed of the entire inland bay system.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2004
Maryland's coastal bays are home to stable populations of crabs, clams and even the once-rare scallop, a report released yesterday shows. But it says the waters around Ocean City remain vulnerable to shoreline development and a growing population. The report, a multiagency effort led by the nonprofit Maryland Coastal Bays Program and the state Department of Natural Resources, is the first of its kind to focus on the five coastal bays, whose health has not been studied nearly as much as that of the Chesapeake Bay. And while the coastal bays are in less dire straits than the Chesapeake, those who live and work along the coast say that doesn't give them much comfort.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
SOUTH POINT -- From her back yard, Phyllis Koenings has a panoramic view of one of the last nearly pristine stretches of Maryland's coastal bays. Soon, though, Koenings will have to share her vista of waterfowl winging across the sparkling water. Just a brisk walk from the two-story Colonial where she has lived since 1993, bulldozers have cut roads through woods so 32 homes can be built. For those who can afford it, waterfront lots are going for $475,000 each. The housing project, subdivided and recorded in the Worcester County land office nearly 12 years ago, highlights the hurdles facing state and local officials as they move in an awkward partnership to curb development pressure that threatens the five ecologically fragile coastal bays.
BUSINESS
By Gary Hornbacher and Gary Hornbacher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 1999
To many people, South Point is just a road on Maryland's Eastern Shore that forks to the right as Route 611 veers left and passes over Sinepuxent Bay on the bridge to Assateague Island National Seashore.But to Bob and Carol Wilson, South Point is more than a road -- it's a small, sheltered peninsular community that seems transported back to another time.It's also where the couple has taken residence in a prefabricated home that began its life in a Nanticoke manufacturing facility.Mr. Wilson, a chief human resources officer at the Johns Hopkins University, and Mrs. Wilson, who worked part-time for a Towson-based law firm, felt drawn to the Eastern Shore when they were considering retirement.
NEWS
October 3, 1996
MARYLAND'S shallow coastal bays are a fragile treasure, an important nursery of fish and crabs. There's little dispute of their ecological value, even while greater protection efforts have long focused on the main Chesapeake estuary.So it's disturbing that federal officials are taking the lead in trying to halt the degradation of Sinepuxent Bay by a shoreline developer, while the Maryland Department of the Environment repeats its compliant refrain: the developer was doing everything he was asked to do.According to the Army Corps of Engineers, however, the developer of the golf course and subdivision near Ocean City had failed to protect the underwater grasses -- required by his permit -- while bulldozing the shoreline and creating heavy erosion and runoff into the bay.It took the personal intervention of Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, at the request of alarmed environmentalists and the National Park Service, that brought regulatory authorities to the construction site last month and got an agreement from developer Tom Ruark to stem the flow of mud into the bay immediately.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | June 16, 1992
OCEAN CITY -- The state's plans to protect threatened birds in Sinepuxent Bay have ruffled the feathers of town officials, who are concerned about the loss of a recreational area for boaters.To protect the nesting and feeding areas of birds like the piping plover, royal tern and black skimmer, the Natural Resources Department will ban boating near 'skimmer' islands near the Route 50 bridge in the bay and along Assateague's northern bay shoreline beginning July 1.The "emergency" ban, which will remain in effect until September, also will prohibit human intrusion in those areas, DNR officials said.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | January 6, 1992
At least a dozen wild ponies at Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland that drowned in the weekend storm were trapped on a narrow, unprotected spit of sand, the National Park Service says."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 1997
Coast Guard and Ocean City public works crews completed the cleanup yesterday of an estimated 71 gallons of diesel fuel that spilled into Sinepuxent Bay when a pipe broke near the Talbot Street Pier, officials said.The Ocean City Office of Emergency Management said the spill occurred about 6: 15 p.m. Monday when a 2-inch pipe that supplied fuel oil at a marina ruptured.The fuel spilled from a pipe at Angler Marina near Talbot Street, said Lt. j.g. Eric Miller of the Coast Guard's marine safety office in Hampton Roads, Va.Miller said the spill was contained by 8 a.m. yesterday with the help of a containment boom placed in the water.
NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Eighty years ago, much of the Mid-Atlantic was recovering from the Great Hurricane of 1933, which struck Aug. 23, 1933. The storm caused widespread destruction and killed 13 people in Maryland, and the scars are visible today. One of the biggest is the Ocean City inlet, which was carved by the storm in 36 hours, connecting the ocean and Sinepuxent Bay. The inlet was made permanent by the Army Corps of Engineers through dredging and the construction of stone jetties on both sides.
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