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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | September 4, 1994
Today's snack: mixed nuts.With a fourth album on the way, Sinead O'Connor is back in the media loop with torrid tales of her own private Troubles. Unable to censor herself, the fragile banshee of rock and roll twists up a joint and does the very bitter bard thing with England's sharp Q magazine."
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The early-'90s ladies almost completely dominate the list, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. Let's flash back 24 years, shall we? 10. "Black Velvet," Alannah Myles This former No. 1 - and future favorite of every single "American Idol" hopefui - was inspired by the life of Elvis Presley. Seriously. "In a flash he was gone/ It happened so soon," indeed. 9. "Forever," Kiss Apparently to make this list you had to go power ballad-y. Congrats, Kiss. P.S.: This one was co-written by Michael Bolton ... if you couldn't already tell.  8. "Get Up!
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ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | December 1, 2005
Sinead O'Connor Sinead O'Connor is not the typical pop musician. She's probably best known for ripping up a photo of the pope during a performance on Saturday Night Live, but she's released a number of albums since then. See her perform at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $40. To order, call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [HARTFORD (CONN.) COURANT] | July 12, 2007
Kelly Rowland -- Ms. Kelly (Columbia) There are moments on this CD -- particularly the Scott Storch-produced "Work," a rump-shaking retread that's essentially "Dangerously in Love" 2007 -- where Rowland follows a little too closely in former band mate Beyonce Knowles' spike-heeled footsteps. And among the other club offerings, only the synth-and-percussion-charged "Like This" avoids crunk-inspired cliches. But those tunes sound like what they likely are: window dressing tacked onto the body of this disc as a sales-motivated afterthought.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 29, 1992
If Ross is a nut and gets elected, he won't be the first.Was Saddam George's guy before the gulf war? Or was it vice versa?Most folk would perform on television free. One local personality is being paid a quarter mill not to.Yeltsin outlawed the newest political party in the name of democracy, comrades.Sinead O'Connor is going to study opera. She is the ideal title role for one.Harvest all the trees at Prettyboy, Liberty and Loch Raven. Forest-lovers can drive to West Virginia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [HARTFORD (CONN.) COURANT] | July 12, 2007
Kelly Rowland -- Ms. Kelly (Columbia) There are moments on this CD -- particularly the Scott Storch-produced "Work," a rump-shaking retread that's essentially "Dangerously in Love" 2007 -- where Rowland follows a little too closely in former band mate Beyonce Knowles' spike-heeled footsteps. And among the other club offerings, only the synth-and-percussion-charged "Like This" avoids crunk-inspired cliches. But those tunes sound like what they likely are: window dressing tacked onto the body of this disc as a sales-motivated afterthought.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | June 5, 1997
Foo FightersThe Colour and the Shape (Capitol 55832)Although it was billed as a band effort, the first Foo Fighters album was really more of a Dave Grohl solo project, as he played most of the parts himself. That's hardly the case with the Foos' follow-up, "The Colour and the Shape," however. Grohl still does double duty, playing drums in addition to his usual role as singer and guitarist, but this time out his contributions are augmented by guitarist Pat Smear and bassist Nate Mendel, and the difference is immediately audible.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1992
Sometimes it seems as if Sinead O'Connor is trying to make a career of contrariness.Never one to settle for the status quo, she appears incapable of playing by other people's rules. When told by her record company that she should look a little more feminine, she shaved off her hair; when nominated for a Grammy, she denounced the whole awards process. Indeed, perhaps the only thing her fans expect of her is that she'll never do the expected.Still, even her staunchest admirers are likely to be taken aback by her latest album, "Am I Not Your Girl?"
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 4, 1994
What put the Cranberries on the map wasn't the pop appeal of songs like "Linger," but the sheer pleasure of listening to Dolores O'Riordan sing.It wasn't just the way her brogue stood out amid the other accents on the radio (though it would be hard to imagine an American making the second syllable of "linger" matter so); no, the most memorable thing about her delivery is its unvarnished emotionality. There's such a plaintive quality to her voice, such an alluring melancholy, that it's hard to hear her without empathizing with the heartbreak she sang about.
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The early-'90s ladies almost completely dominate the list, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. Let's flash back 24 years, shall we? 10. "Black Velvet," Alannah Myles This former No. 1 - and future favorite of every single "American Idol" hopefui - was inspired by the life of Elvis Presley. Seriously. "In a flash he was gone/ It happened so soon," indeed. 9. "Forever," Kiss Apparently to make this list you had to go power ballad-y. Congrats, Kiss. P.S.: This one was co-written by Michael Bolton ... if you couldn't already tell.  8. "Get Up!
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | December 1, 2005
Sinead O'Connor Sinead O'Connor is not the typical pop musician. She's probably best known for ripping up a photo of the pope during a performance on Saturday Night Live, but she's released a number of albums since then. See her perform at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $40. To order, call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | June 5, 1997
Foo FightersThe Colour and the Shape (Capitol 55832)Although it was billed as a band effort, the first Foo Fighters album was really more of a Dave Grohl solo project, as he played most of the parts himself. That's hardly the case with the Foos' follow-up, "The Colour and the Shape," however. Grohl still does double duty, playing drums in addition to his usual role as singer and guitarist, but this time out his contributions are augmented by guitarist Pat Smear and bassist Nate Mendel, and the difference is immediately audible.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 4, 1994
What put the Cranberries on the map wasn't the pop appeal of songs like "Linger," but the sheer pleasure of listening to Dolores O'Riordan sing.It wasn't just the way her brogue stood out amid the other accents on the radio (though it would be hard to imagine an American making the second syllable of "linger" matter so); no, the most memorable thing about her delivery is its unvarnished emotionality. There's such a plaintive quality to her voice, such an alluring melancholy, that it's hard to hear her without empathizing with the heartbreak she sang about.
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | September 4, 1994
Today's snack: mixed nuts.With a fourth album on the way, Sinead O'Connor is back in the media loop with torrid tales of her own private Troubles. Unable to censor herself, the fragile banshee of rock and roll twists up a joint and does the very bitter bard thing with England's sharp Q magazine."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 29, 1992
If Ross is a nut and gets elected, he won't be the first.Was Saddam George's guy before the gulf war? Or was it vice versa?Most folk would perform on television free. One local personality is being paid a quarter mill not to.Yeltsin outlawed the newest political party in the name of democracy, comrades.Sinead O'Connor is going to study opera. She is the ideal title role for one.Harvest all the trees at Prettyboy, Liberty and Loch Raven. Forest-lovers can drive to West Virginia.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1992
Sometimes it seems as if Sinead O'Connor is trying to make a career of contrariness.Never one to settle for the status quo, she appears incapable of playing by other people's rules. When told by her record company that she should look a little more feminine, she shaved off her hair; when nominated for a Grammy, she denounced the whole awards process. Indeed, perhaps the only thing her fans expect of her is that she'll never do the expected.Still, even her staunchest admirers are likely to be taken aback by her latest album, "Am I Not Your Girl?"
FEATURES
February 17, 1991
RECORD OF THE YEAR: "Another Day in Paradise," Phil Collins; "From a Distance," Bette Midler; "Nothing Compares 2 U," Sinead O'Connor; "U Can't Touch This," M.C. Hammer; "Vision of Love," Mariah Carey.ALBUM OF THE YEAR: "Back on the Block," Quincy Jones; ". . . But Seriously," Phil Collins; "Mariah Carey," Mariah Carey; "Please Hammer Don't Hurt 'Em," M.C. Hammer; "Wilson Phillips," Wilson Phillips.SONG OF THE YEAR: "Another Day in Paradise," Phil Collins; "From a Distance," Julie Gold; "Hold On," Chynna Phillips, Glen Ballard and Carnie Wilson; "Nothing Compares 2 U," Prince; "Vision of Love," Mariah Carey and Ben Margulies.
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