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Sinclair Broadcast Group

BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 4, 2006
Shares of Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. climbed nearly 9 percent yesterday after the Hunt Valley company posted a 27 percent increase in first-quarter earnings. Hunt Valley-based Sinclair, whose 60 television stations reach nearly a quarter of U.S. households, said net income was $11.2 million, or 13 cents a share, for the three months that ended March 31, compared with $8.8 million, or 10 cents a share, for the first quarter last year. The stock rose 70 cents to close at $8.60 on the Nasdaq stock market.
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FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 2006
The CW network, which is being launched this fall, will be broadcast in Baltimore on WNUV (Channel 54). The fledgling network is being formed by the merger of two underachieving broadcast operations, UPN and WB, and will target viewers 18 to 34 years old. Its fall lineup, which will be announced this month, is expected to include the WB's Gilmore Girls and UPN's America's Next Top Model. Managed by the Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group, WNUV is the Baltimore affiliate for the WB network, and although the CW startup was announced in January, no Baltimore outlet had been secured until yesterday.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
This fall, UPN and WB, which have struggled and failed to find a large audience, will cease to exist. Rising from their ashes will be a new broadcast television network, CW. Some of the expiring networks' more popular programming - including UPN's Veronica Mars, Smackdown and Everybody Hates Chris and WB's Smallville and Gilmore Girls - will be aired on CW, Leslie Moonves, chief executive of CBS Corp., said yesterday in announcing the move, which amounts to an acknowledgement that neither of the small networks could survive profitably on its own. More coverage The impact at Sinclair Broadcast Group.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
A television reporter fired a year ago after accusing his employer, Sinclair Broadcast Group, of a right-wing bias has been sued by the company for damages and for what it says are violations of his contract. The suit says that in October 2004 Jon Leiberman, Sinclair's Washington bureau chief at the time, broke company rules by speaking publicly about his disaffection with his bosses after they ordered Sinclair stations around the country to pass off as news a documentary critical of presidential candidate Sen. John F. Kerry.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
The Supreme Court declined yesterday to hear appeals from newspapers and broadcasters seeking to restore new federal rules that would have eased restrictions on the number of media outlets a company can own in one market. The decision is a setback for five media groups that petitioned the court, arguing that the Federal Communications Commission should allow more cross-ownership and consolidation in an industry increasingly fragmented by competition from cable television, satellite broadcasting and the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Is Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., accused by critics of behaving like a private company at times, ready to become a private entity? That seemed to be the million-dollar question during the Hunt Valley broadcast company's conference call yesterday to discuss first-quarter earnings. The company tossed cold water on the idea as quickly as it entertained it, however. Sinclair executives have long asserted that the company's stock is undervalued. Its shares rose 51 cents, or nearly 7 percent, yesterday to close at $8. The company believes its worth is closer to $12. Barton Crockett, an analyst with JPMorgan, asked hypothetically why the company doesn't revert to private status if it believes it isn't earning its worth in the public markets.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2005
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Monday Construction spending for March Institute for Supply Management index for April Earnings: Avon Products Inc., DirecTV Group Inc., Humana Inc., Sysco Corp., Tyson Foods Inc., Principal Financial Group Inc. Tuesday Auto and truck sales for April Factory orders for March Earnings: Caremark Rx Inc., Emerson Electric Co., Loews Corp., Qwest Communications International Inc., Safeway Inc., St. Paul Travelers Cos., Tyco International Ltd., Aon Corp.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | April 13, 2005
Maryland has denied unemployment benefits to Sinclair Broadcast Group whistleblower Jon Leiberman, fired last fall for criticizing plans to air an anti-John Kerry documentary shortly before the 2004 presidential election, www.broadcasting cable.com reported last night. Leiberman, a Westminster native, was fired by Hunt Valley-based Sinclair after he told The Sun the documentary Stolen Honor was "propaganda." The Reed Business Information-operated Web site reported that a state Department of Labor report labeled Leiberman's actions "gross misconduct" and a "wanton disregard" of his obligations to Sinclair.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Sinclair Broadcast Group, the Hunt Valley broadcaster that is one of the nation's largest independent owners of television stations, has settled a long-running dispute with Comcast Corp. that will allow viewers of Sinclair stations to watch programs in high-definition. The disagreement reached a critical point in January when Comcast subscribers in Baltimore and in Baltimore County complained that they wouldn't be able to watch the Super Bowl in high-definition because Sinclair wouldn't allow the cable company to carry the digital signal for its Fox affiliate.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
In a setback for Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. and other broadcasters, federal regulators ruled yesterday that cable companies would not have to carry more than one television signal for every broadcast company - a key ruling as the industry shifts toward digital TV. A digital signal can carry more information without using any more space on the broadcast spectrum. Sinclair and other broadcasters want cable companies to be required to carry six digital channels offered by a local television station - known as multicasting.
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