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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 12, 1993
Los Angeles -- Come fall, more than a dozen new network series will feature single parents -- making it one of the upcoming season's big TV trends.But Sinbad, the comedian, thinks his new Fox series about a single parent, "The Sinbad Show," will stand out in at least one way: The single parent is an African-American man."I think it's about time that we saw an African-American man raising a family on TV," says Sinbad during a press conference to promote his series."I'm so tired of reading all the negativity about black fathers running away and no black men as role models in society," he says.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2003
Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas is a misfire in almost every direction. Its story is uninvolved - a surprise, given the source material(s). Its animation is uninspired. Its voices are unmemorable. And its pitch is uncannily off - too high-toned for kids, too slapdash for adults and too all-over-the-map to have come from the same studio that gave the world Shrek just two years ago. In a careless mishmash of Arab, Roman and Greek legends (with a little Pete the Pirate thrown in), Sinbad portrays the titular hero (voiced by Brad Pitt, who's not a star because of his voice)
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By David Zurawik | September 16, 1993
Another stand-up comic gets his own show and comes through. Sinbad plays David Bryan, an upwardly mobile bachelor who winds up with two foster kids and a sudden crimp in his bachelor ways.The kids are 12-year-old L. J. (Willie Norwood) and 5-year-old Zana (Erin Davis), a brother and sister who are about to be split up.The word is that Fox is having some problems fine-tuning the show. But the pilot looked OK, and it's got a great time slot, after "The Simpsons."L "The Sinbad Show" premieres tonight at 8:30 p.m. on Fox. ** 1/2
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By Beth Pinsker and Beth Pinsker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 30, 1996
If you remember "The Toy," the 1982 film with Richard Pryor baby-sitting a poor little rich boy whose father ignored him, then you might think you don't have to bother with "First Kid." It just moves the action to the White House and blatantly rips off a comedy that wasn't so great in the first place.But that earlier film was just a remake of a 1976 French film, "Le Jouet," and this latest attempt may surprise you because it works better than its American ancestor.Sinbad takes Pryor's role, and instead of playing the caretaker as a loser, Sinbad's too cool for school (especially for the snooty prep school he attends with his charge)
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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | March 4, 1991
SINBAD, THE COMEDIAN and actor on "A Different World," came to Morgan State University yesterday and tickled some 2,400 funny bones, sometimes his own.Reliving life experiences such as "whoopings" for not cutting the grass, and making observations about last night's show, including the spotlight man who "passed out" and almost dropped the light, he kept the sellout crowd in stitches."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2003
Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas is a misfire in almost every direction. Its story is uninvolved - a surprise, given the source material(s). Its animation is uninspired. Its voices are unmemorable. And its pitch is uncannily off - too high-toned for kids, too slapdash for adults and too all-over-the-map to have come from the same studio that gave the world Shrek just two years ago. In a careless mishmash of Arab, Roman and Greek legends (with a little Pete the Pirate thrown in), Sinbad portrays the titular hero (voiced by Brad Pitt, who's not a star because of his voice)
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By Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1991
It has been a little while since Sinbad last appeared on TV, so he decided to return in a big way: his own hourlong special on ABC."Sinbad & Friends All the Way Live . . . Almost," which is scheduled to air at 8 p.m. tomorrow on WJZ-TV (Channel 13), is the comic's first appearance since leaving NBC's "A Different World" and "It's Showtime at the Apollo" earlier this year.Sinbad had been on "A Different World" for four years, playing counselor Walter Oakes of fictitious Hillman College. He also spent two years as host of the syndicated "Apollo" variety show.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
A three-time Emmy winner from Carroll County has been nominated for a fourth award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for hercamera work on an HBO special.Donna Quante and five other cameraoperators were nominated in the category of technical director, camera, video control for the program "Sinbad: Brain Damaged."
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By Beth Pinsker and Beth Pinsker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 30, 1996
If you remember "The Toy," the 1982 film with Richard Pryor baby-sitting a poor little rich boy whose father ignored him, then you might think you don't have to bother with "First Kid." It just moves the action to the White House and blatantly rips off a comedy that wasn't so great in the first place.But that earlier film was just a remake of a 1976 French film, "Le Jouet," and this latest attempt may surprise you because it works better than its American ancestor.Sinbad takes Pryor's role, and instead of playing the caretaker as a loser, Sinbad's too cool for school (especially for the snooty prep school he attends with his charge)
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By Soren Andersen and Soren Andersen,McClatchy News Service | January 6, 1995
Submitted for your consideration on this first full weekend of the new year: a movie with a bad case of the screaming meemies. It's "Houseguest."Ladies and gentlemen, insert earplugs now. Insert them for countless scenes in which a half-wit hoodlum shrieks shrill abuse at his quarter-wit hoodlum brother. Keep them in for the hysteria-soaked exchanges between the hero and his best buddy from the old neighborhood. Leave them in place for a drunken-party scene, and whatever you do, do not -- repeat, not -- remove them until the driving-our-Jeep-down-railroad-tracks- toward-an-oncoming-train scene is over.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
You could do far worse tonight than settle in for an evening of Errol Flynn on TCM. So do it already."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Don't miss this repeat of a landmark in TV history, as Tom Selleck first appears as Courteney Cox's boyfriend (TV Guide says they're TV's sexiest couple). NBC."Essence Awards" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Halle Berry and Sinbad are hosts for this salute to seven African-Americans chosen for their efforts to help young people of all races.
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By Claudia Puig and Claudia Puig,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 1996
With the Atlanta Olympics taking up residence in U.S. living rooms for 17 days in midsummer, will Americans still venture out to their local multiplexes?Film distributors are wrestling with that question as they set release schedules for what already promises to be the most crowded movie summer ever. For some, the solution is to counterprogram, or release films that target those less likely to be hooked on the Summer Games; others plan to avoid the July 19-Aug. 4 period altogether.Hollywood's summer, which began May 10 and continues through Labor Day weekend, is scheduled to see the release of 53 major-studio films.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1995
Television's ability to explore and educate is on display tonight in a pair of PBS documentary series -- but so is its ability to take talented performers and reduce them to mushy misfits.* "The 1995 Essence Awards" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Sinbad and Natalie Cole preside over the annual show that honors outstanding African-Americans. Among the recipients this year: Janet Jackson, Stevie Wonder and Gen. Colin Powell. Local note: Jada Pinkett, a graduate of the Baltimore School for the Arts, is among the scheduled performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Soren Andersen and Soren Andersen,McClatchy News Service | January 6, 1995
Submitted for your consideration on this first full weekend of the new year: a movie with a bad case of the screaming meemies. It's "Houseguest."Ladies and gentlemen, insert earplugs now. Insert them for countless scenes in which a half-wit hoodlum shrieks shrill abuse at his quarter-wit hoodlum brother. Keep them in for the hysteria-soaked exchanges between the hero and his best buddy from the old neighborhood. Leave them in place for a drunken-party scene, and whatever you do, do not -- repeat, not -- remove them until the driving-our-Jeep-down-railroad-tracks- toward-an-oncoming-train scene is over.
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By CLARENCE PAGE | June 24, 1994
Imagine, for a moment, the public outcry if the networks were to announce that, in the new fall season, ''Blossom'' and ''Married . . . with Children'' will be the only prime-time network television programs that would portray the lives of white people in America.Right. It couldn't happen. Audiences would not tolerate such a narrow portrayal of white people. The public would demand more diversity -- more dramas, more docu-dramas, more action, more soaps, more stories of love, more stories of hate, more triumph, more tragedy, more of a reflection of real life as we know it.But, if you can imagine how upset white television viewers would be by a steady diet of narrow depictions of their lives, perhaps you can begin to understand why so many black television viewers are upset to hear that the Fox Television Network has decided to drop ''Roc,'' ''Sinbad'' and ''South Central'' from their fall lineup.
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By David Zurawik | September 16, 1993
Another stand-up comic gets his own show and comes through. Sinbad plays David Bryan, an upwardly mobile bachelor who winds up with two foster kids and a sudden crimp in his bachelor ways.The kids are 12-year-old L. J. (Willie Norwood) and 5-year-old Zana (Erin Davis), a brother and sister who are about to be split up.The word is that Fox is having some problems fine-tuning the show. But the pilot looked OK, and it's got a great time slot, after "The Simpsons."L "The Sinbad Show" premieres tonight at 8:30 p.m. on Fox. ** 1/2
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By Steve McKerrow | December 26, 1991
The Weekend Watch:LOOKING BACK -- A pair of shows tonight review the arts and entertainment past. At 8 o'clock on ABC (Channel 13), "Entertainers '91: The Top 20 of the Year" is a celebration of the past year's most influential figures as chosen by cable's E! Entertainment network. Comedian Dennis Miller is the host. And at 9 p.m. on CBS (Channel 11), the annual "Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts" program pays tribute to Roy Acuff, Betty Comden & Adolph Green, The Nicholas Brothers, Gregory Peck and Robert Shaw.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 24, 1994
Imagine, for a moment, the public outcry if the networks were to announce that, in the new fall season, ''Blossom'' and ''Married . . . with Children'' will be the only prime-time network television programs that would portray the lives of white people in America.Right. It couldn't happen. Audiences would not tolerate such a narrow portrayal of white people. The public would demand more diversity -- more dramas, more docu-dramas, more action, more soaps, more stories of love, more stories of hate, more triumph, more tragedy, more of a reflection of real life as we know it.But, if you can imagine how upset white television viewers would be by a steady diet of narrow depictions of their lives, perhaps you can begin to understand why so many black television viewers are upset to hear that the Fox Television Network has decided to drop ''Roc,'' ''Sinbad'' and ''South Central'' from their fall lineup.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 12, 1993
Los Angeles -- Come fall, more than a dozen new network series will feature single parents -- making it one of the upcoming season's big TV trends.But Sinbad, the comedian, thinks his new Fox series about a single parent, "The Sinbad Show," will stand out in at least one way: The single parent is an African-American man."I think it's about time that we saw an African-American man raising a family on TV," says Sinbad during a press conference to promote his series."I'm so tired of reading all the negativity about black fathers running away and no black men as role models in society," he says.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 26, 1993
Fox Broadcasting has finally become a full-time, seven-night-a-week TV network. But from the looks of the schedule it announced yesterday, Fox has had to take some of the edge off its cutting-edge approach to programming to do it.Fox will still be the youngest and most hip network by far next fall, with a new variety show from Robert Townsend and a sitcom featuring Queen Latifah among 11 new shows. But it will also have a sitcom featuring Don Rickles and a talk show with Chevy Chase, neither of whom are exactly twentysomething.
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