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By Nick Madigan and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Iris Straitt had some sage parting words for her son. "Enjoy those cookies, darling," she said with a wave, as Richard Straitt, a National Guardsman based in Dundalk, walked to a bus Thursday morning, the first steps of his yearlong deployment to Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. "I love ya," she added softly, the words almost lost in the bustle outside the Jerome M. Grollman Armory, where 85 members of the Maryland Army National Guard's 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment, had just been given a send-off by Gov. Martin O'Malley and a group of Army brass.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Iris Straitt had some sage parting words for her son. "Enjoy those cookies, darling," she said with a wave, as Richard Straitt, a National Guardsman based in Dundalk, walked to a bus Thursday morning, the first steps of his yearlong deployment to Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. "I love ya," she added softly, the words almost lost in the bustle outside the Jerome M. Grollman Armory, where 85 members of the Maryland Army National Guard's 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment, had just been given a send-off by Gov. Martin O'Malley and a group of Army brass.
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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
FORT BRAGG, N.C. -- The Desert Panthers, most of them National Guardsmen from the Maryland-Virginia 29th Division, were eager yesterday to start six months in the Sinai Peninsula monitoring the truce line between Egypt and Israel.Officially the 4th Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division, the Desert Panthers are making Army history.U.S. troops have served in the monitoring force since 1981. But the 4th Battalion is the first to combine the Army National Guard and Army Reserve troops with the regular Army for international peacekeeping duties.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 12, 2002
NOAM SHEIZAF stood at the podium in the auditorium of the Baltimore Hebrew University last Wednesday, his slender frame adorned by a casual, short-sleeved black shirt open at the collar. With his eyeglasses and mass of dark hair, he looked more college student than warrior. But warrior Sheizaf is -- or was. The 28-year-old Israeli is a former platoon and company commander in his country's army. He joined at 18, a requirement of all Israeli citizens. Sheizaf was in Israel's reserves when he made the decision that would eventually bring him from the streets of Hebron on the Israeli-occupied West Bank to upper Park Heights Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 1999
BASATA CAMP, Egypt -- The only stars at this desert resort are the ones above your head. There are no phones at this collection of bamboo huts nestled beside a sapphire cove in the Sinai desert. There's no television. No pool. No perky aerobics instructor in spandex leading exercises on the beach. If you want a hearty breakfast or a sumptuous lunch, you'll have to fix it yourself. That's the way Sherif El-Ghamrawy planned it. When Ghamrawy founded his paradise by the sea, the word "simplicity" -- "basata" in Arabic -- came to mind.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 12, 2002
NOAM SHEIZAF stood at the podium in the auditorium of the Baltimore Hebrew University last Wednesday, his slender frame adorned by a casual, short-sleeved black shirt open at the collar. With his eyeglasses and mass of dark hair, he looked more college student than warrior. But warrior Sheizaf is -- or was. The 28-year-old Israeli is a former platoon and company commander in his country's army. He joined at 18, a requirement of all Israeli citizens. Sheizaf was in Israel's reserves when he made the decision that would eventually bring him from the streets of Hebron on the Israeli-occupied West Bank to upper Park Heights Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Richard C. Gross | February 21, 2002
THE 16-MONTH war of attrition between Israel and the Palestinians -- a tit-for-tatting that is tick-tocking its way toward certain catastrophe -- is as senseless, as wasteful and as futile as the dying on both sides. Neither Israeli nor Palestinian will give in unless forced from the outside. History written in a lot of spilled blood has proved that. For the majority of Palestinians, Israel is the Goliath hungering for their land, hunkering over it with tanks and planes armed with missiles followed by those with bulldozers who would plant settlements and pave roads.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Carl W. Stearn, a former Provident Bank chairman who also had headed the old Equitable Bank, died of complications from cancer Saturday at a hospice in Naples, Fla. The Lutherville resident was 73. Born in Garden City, N.Y., he earned a bachelor's degree from Amherst College and a law degree from Columbia University before serving in the Army in counterintelligence. He held executive positions with Bankers Trust Co. in New York and Fidelity Bank in Philadelphia before moving to Baltimore in 1982 to become president and director of Equitable.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 26, 2004
CAIRO - The worst terrorist attack in Egypt in seven years was organized by a Palestinian angered by Israeli policies, the Egyptian government said yesterday, announcing the first arrests in coordinated bombings that killed 34 people this month in the Sinai peninsula. The Interior Ministry said a Palestinian driver and eight Egyptian accomplices used simple washing-machine timers, stolen cars and decades-old explosives to rig the car bomb that partly destroyed the Taba Hilton hotel, as well as two other bombs at nearby campgrounds.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
Mohamed Abdel Ghani al-Gamasy, 81, who served as Egypt's army chief of operations during the 1973 Arab-Israeli war and then led his country's delegation to the truce table, died yesterday in Cairo after a long illness. Less than two months after the war, General al-Gamasy was appointed chief of staff and swiftly rose to minister of war. General al-Gamasy traveled after his retirement from the Egyptian army in 1981 to the United States, the then-Soviet Union and many Arab countries to lecture and serve as military consultant.
NEWS
By Richard C. Gross | February 21, 2002
THE 16-MONTH war of attrition between Israel and the Palestinians -- a tit-for-tatting that is tick-tocking its way toward certain catastrophe -- is as senseless, as wasteful and as futile as the dying on both sides. Neither Israeli nor Palestinian will give in unless forced from the outside. History written in a lot of spilled blood has proved that. For the majority of Palestinians, Israel is the Goliath hungering for their land, hunkering over it with tanks and planes armed with missiles followed by those with bulldozers who would plant settlements and pave roads.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 1999
BASATA CAMP, Egypt -- The only stars at this desert resort are the ones above your head. There are no phones at this collection of bamboo huts nestled beside a sapphire cove in the Sinai desert. There's no television. No pool. No perky aerobics instructor in spandex leading exercises on the beach. If you want a hearty breakfast or a sumptuous lunch, you'll have to fix it yourself. That's the way Sherif El-Ghamrawy planned it. When Ghamrawy founded his paradise by the sea, the word "simplicity" -- "basata" in Arabic -- came to mind.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
FORT BRAGG, N.C. -- The Desert Panthers, most of them National Guardsmen from the Maryland-Virginia 29th Division, were eager yesterday to start six months in the Sinai Peninsula monitoring the truce line between Egypt and Israel.Officially the 4th Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division, the Desert Panthers are making Army history.U.S. troops have served in the monitoring force since 1981. But the 4th Battalion is the first to combine the Army National Guard and Army Reserve troops with the regular Army for international peacekeeping duties.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 9, 2010
Albert T. Schmith, a retired career Army officer who later was dean of students at the Johns Hopkins University, died of respiratory failure Feb. 23 at his Havre de Grace home. He was 75. Mr. Schmith was born and raised in Providence, R.I., where he graduated from La Salle Academy in 1951. He enlisted in the Army in 1951 and through the ROTC earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1958 from Boston University and later a master's degree from George Washington University. Mr. Schmith, who was a graduate of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., served two tours in Vietnam from 1964 to 1965 and from 1969 to 1970.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
SIX SERVICE PERSONNEL DEPLOYED TO MIDEASTThe following area service personnel have been deployed in the Middle East with U.S. military forces participating in Operation Desert Shield:* Private First Class Michael F. Keenan, son of Leo J. and Kathleen M.Keenan of Annapolis.* Specialist Lawrence H. Griest, son of Lawrence H. Griest Sr. of Millersville. He is a 1985 graduate of Arundel Senior High School.* Navy Petty Officer Second Class John E. Gustafson, son of Dennis M.and Norma L. Gustafson of Severn.
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