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TRAVEL
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
I THOUGHT I WAS A PRETTY SAVVY Las Vegas traveler. I've had the foie gras as big as a football at Picasso's, the five-star gourmet room at the Bellagio. I've listened to a Nevada lieutenant governor belt out torch songs at her ristorante just outside of town and partied with card sharks at the World Series of Poker. Frankly, it's nothing to brag about. Go to Vegas 50, maybe 60, times during the course of 25 years and stuff happens. But my most recent trip, where the challenge was to do Vegas over a weekend for $500 -- including airfare, hotel, food, entertainment and gambling -- required breaking new ground, even for a far-too- frequent flier to Sin City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 25, 2011
Don’t be fooled by the photo of the python and bikini-clad lady curled up on the couch. Vegas was all work, no play for City Council President Jack Young . Young, who long considered the annual Vegas shoppingcenter convention a junket, attended for the first time Sunday and Monday. “I thought it was a lot of fun and games; no fun and games,” Young told me Wednesday. “I used to criticize those types of trips. It’s work. Maybe 45 minutes, maybe less than that, you have a chance to sit down and eat, and even then you’re talking to developers.” Young said he spend his two days in Vegas talking to representatives of Wal-Mart, Harris Teeter and other retailers interested in expanding in Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
Frank Miller's take on The Spirit should make comic modern-day fanboys happy, what with its dark undertones, its beat-it-to-a-pulp action and its sly winks at comic greats past and present. Everyone else, including fans of Will Eisner's original Spirit, may find themselves wondering what all the fuss is about. By taking Eisner's '40s-era hero and updating him for the 21st century, Miller has done little more than make him just another guy fighting moral decrepitude in the big city. If that sounds like something you've heard before, it is - in both The Dark Knight and Miller's own Sin City, which Robert Rodriguez put on the big screen in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
Frank Miller's take on The Spirit should make comic modern-day fanboys happy, what with its dark undertones, its beat-it-to-a-pulp action and its sly winks at comic greats past and present. Everyone else, including fans of Will Eisner's original Spirit, may find themselves wondering what all the fuss is about. By taking Eisner's '40s-era hero and updating him for the 21st century, Miller has done little more than make him just another guy fighting moral decrepitude in the big city. If that sounds like something you've heard before, it is - in both The Dark Knight and Miller's own Sin City, which Robert Rodriguez put on the big screen in 2005.
NEWS
April 12, 2007
?It?s a great house. I love that house. I?d rather not sell the house, but my wife?s in charge of these things, not me.? Gov. Martin O?Malley on putting his Northeast Baltimore house on the market Article, PG 1B Up Next Sunday A Grander Canyon Hey, Sin City - top this. The Hualapai Nation hopes to lure Las Vegas gamblers to Grand Canyon West. Great views, helicopter rides and did we mention the skywalk? in TRAVEL Wear your own DNA It can decide a murder trial or a paternity case, but DNA also can inspire art and jewelry.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun movie critic | March 9, 2007
With 300, a blood-strewn retelling of that apotheosis of Spartan military glory, the Battle of Thermopylae, cinema has once again proven its ability to incorporate every other mass-media art form. Director Zack Snyder and his computer wizards have made the best example yet of the movie-as-comic-book. Based on a graphic novel by Frank Miller, whose testosterone-soaked storytelling has made him a genre favorite, 300 captures not only the look and feel of its source material, but its essence as well.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 3, 1990
CINCINNATI -- Just across the Ohio River from button-down Cincinnati, in a community nicknamed "Sin City," stripper Beth Roberts dances to "Tutti Fruiti" in nothing but pasties and string panties.On the pink carpeted walls of the Brass Bull, where the 23-year-old Ms. Roberts works, are velvet paintings of women in various stages of undress."I see nude women all day long," Ms. Roberts said yesterday. "Now, I like art, don't get me wrong, but I like country pictures. You know -- ducks, geese and cows."
NEWS
November 9, 1993
Sin cityAccording to the Nov. 8 issue of Forbes magazine, Philadelphia will have legalized working casinos by September 1995. The voters will approve the measure by a 4-to-1 margin as they think about the city's funds being siphoned off by Atlantic City.The need to draw events to Philadelphia's new half-billion dollar convention center is also a prime consideration.Where does that leave Baltimore? Nowhere good, unless . . . we can beat the competition. If we don't, the city stands to lose millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 25, 2011
Don’t be fooled by the photo of the python and bikini-clad lady curled up on the couch. Vegas was all work, no play for City Council President Jack Young . Young, who long considered the annual Vegas shoppingcenter convention a junket, attended for the first time Sunday and Monday. “I thought it was a lot of fun and games; no fun and games,” Young told me Wednesday. “I used to criticize those types of trips. It’s work. Maybe 45 minutes, maybe less than that, you have a chance to sit down and eat, and even then you’re talking to developers.” Young said he spend his two days in Vegas talking to representatives of Wal-Mart, Harris Teeter and other retailers interested in expanding in Baltimore.
TRAVEL
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
When the Fetish and Fantasy Halloween Ball made its debut in Las Vegas seven years ago, it was a fringe event attended by several hundred people in a vintage clothing store off the Las Vegas Strip. Since then, the ball's popularity has soared, and this year's party will be held at a hotel-casino where 6,000 guests are expected. More telling, the event that flaunts its eroticism has been imitated by nightclubs at other casinos, where the action is slightly more tame but the costumes are almost as racy.
TRAVEL
By Mark La Monica and Mark La Monica,Newsday | April 6, 2008
LAS VEGAS -- Fifty years ago, with equal parts charisma and martinis, Frank Sinatra made Las Vegas. In 1996, Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau introduced that Vegas cool to a new generation with their movie Swingers. Now, it's a losing bet to see a group of friends living it up in Vegas and not saying "Vegas, baby, Vegas!" at least three times an hour. And remember, what happens in Vegas ... gets written about here in the guys' guide to a Las Vegas bachelor party. Some basic principles apply.
NEWS
April 12, 2007
?It?s a great house. I love that house. I?d rather not sell the house, but my wife?s in charge of these things, not me.? Gov. Martin O?Malley on putting his Northeast Baltimore house on the market Article, PG 1B Up Next Sunday A Grander Canyon Hey, Sin City - top this. The Hualapai Nation hopes to lure Las Vegas gamblers to Grand Canyon West. Great views, helicopter rides and did we mention the skywalk? in TRAVEL Wear your own DNA It can decide a murder trial or a paternity case, but DNA also can inspire art and jewelry.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun movie critic | March 9, 2007
With 300, a blood-strewn retelling of that apotheosis of Spartan military glory, the Battle of Thermopylae, cinema has once again proven its ability to incorporate every other mass-media art form. Director Zack Snyder and his computer wizards have made the best example yet of the movie-as-comic-book. Based on a graphic novel by Frank Miller, whose testosterone-soaked storytelling has made him a genre favorite, 300 captures not only the look and feel of its source material, but its essence as well.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 1, 2005
Sin City raises the question, "Does every milestone comic book demand to be made into a movie?" and answers it with a resounding "No." Frank Miller has co-directed three of his own Sin City graphic novels with Robert Rodriguez, who also shot and cut the film, composed the music and plays a corrupt priest. The result is probably the most literal adaptation of a published work ever committed to celluloid - also the most repetitive and assaulting. The grabby graphics exert a hypnotic spell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | March 27, 2005
Frank Miller created Sin City for the comics pages and he was determined that's where it would stay. Outside those pages, he was certain, he would lose control of his highly idiosyncratic, graphically over-the-top vision of a city gone bad, where sex and violence are the rules rather than the exceptions. In Sin City, the women are defined by their G-strings and stiletto heels, the men by their profane speech, their rough-and-tumble manners and their skills with a gun. The last thing Miller wanted was to see things prettied up for the silver screen.
TRAVEL
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
When the Fetish and Fantasy Halloween Ball made its debut in Las Vegas seven years ago, it was a fringe event attended by several hundred people in a vintage clothing store off the Las Vegas Strip. Since then, the ball's popularity has soared, and this year's party will be held at a hotel-casino where 6,000 guests are expected. More telling, the event that flaunts its eroticism has been imitated by nightclubs at other casinos, where the action is slightly more tame but the costumes are almost as racy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | March 27, 2005
Frank Miller created Sin City for the comics pages and he was determined that's where it would stay. Outside those pages, he was certain, he would lose control of his highly idiosyncratic, graphically over-the-top vision of a city gone bad, where sex and violence are the rules rather than the exceptions. In Sin City, the women are defined by their G-strings and stiletto heels, the men by their profane speech, their rough-and-tumble manners and their skills with a gun. The last thing Miller wanted was to see things prettied up for the silver screen.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
SALT LAKE CITY - It's Saturday night in the city that Brigham Young built, where the bright lights of downtown are more likely to be from the Mormon Temple than some hot nightspot. But that doesn't deter Rocky Anderson, the city's Minister of Fun, who also happens to be Salt Lake's first-term mayor. Anderson swears the city of 170,000 has a pulse that quickens when the sun goes down and a soul that stirs when the tempo is upbeat. You just have to know where to look. Like Diogenes in search of an honest man, Anderson is leading a one-man crusade for fun, an uphill battle against image.
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