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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 21, 1993
Seven miles north of Gaithersburg, on the cusp of urban sprawl, lies the tranquil town of Laytonsville, a low-tech reminder of Montgomery County's verdant past.Here, just beyond the business parks, twin arches and fitness centers pushing toward them, live townsfolk addicted to simple pleasures: well water, pig roasts and 4-H.Here, people reside in ancestral Victorian homes. They measure time by catastrophic events -- everything happened before or after George Mobley's barn burned down. And they rent P.O. boxes so they can mosey in and chat with Ethel Clemons, the postmistress.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
For the nearly 100 residents of Dundalk Mobile Court who went without power for a week, the return of electricity couldn't come on soon enough — and everybody had a plan for what to do when it did. Dolores Moakley, 70, a retired home health care nurse, couldn't wait to wash up in comfort. "The first thing I'm going to do is take a warm shower. I'm tired of a week's worth of cold showers," she said, standing in the yard of the mobile home where she has lived for the past 12 years The people at the trailer park were among the last people to have their power restored in the Baltimore area.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 25, 2001
"Simplicity" is the new mantra in the decor domain. It means plain, as in spare: white sheets, unadorned dinnerware, curtain panels instead of drapes, sheer fabrics, neutrals dotted with a few jewel or earth colors. It means matelasse coverlets instead of floral bedspreads, and orchids instead of ficus trees as houseplants. Carrie Tuhy, managing editor of the magazine Real Simple, considers the trend a confluence of three things: one, people like to simplify because it puts order in their lives; two, women live far more affluent and choice-abundant lives than in the past; and three, it's a form of guilt-free consumption, saying, "I know who I am and I buy this because it will improve my life."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 22, 2010
With a handful of amusement parks within easy driving distance, Baltimoreans can spend their summer weekends sampling breath-taking roller coasters, cavorting with some of their kids' favorite animated characters or getting soaked even though they're miles from the nearest ocean. And for those who haven't been in a few years — maybe it's time to once again sample the simple summer pleasures that only an amusement park can provide. Here's a look at five parks within 200 miles of the center of Baltimore, along with a sampling of what new rides and attractions they have to offer.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 8, 2001
Last Saturday afternoon my brother Eddie and I landed at his Poultney Street home. We put down our shopping bags for a minute, and he said: Don't get too comfortable or even think about taking a nap. There was still some time left to go out and enjoy the pleasures of a cool Baltimore 4 o'clock. On foot. And hurry up. Within a few seconds we were at the Cross Street Market, walking the main aisle, going over the late summer's offerings. The market, like the city in which it's located, is full of simple pleasures.
TRAVEL
By Clifford Pugh and By Clifford Pugh,Houston Chronicle | May 4, 2003
It's a misty morning in Kardamyli, Greece, a tiny beach town that hugs the rocky coast of the Outer Mani region of the Peloponnesus, as a couple orders a light breakfast of orange juice and yogurt at a small cafe across from the town square. Suddenly, the only employee in the cafe hops on a bicycle and rides off without saying a word, leaving the bewildered tourists and a few Greek men contemplating their morning coffee and worry beads. He returns five minutes later with a plastic bag containing several small containers of yogurt.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
Plagued though he was by misfortune of (literally) biblical proportions, even the long-suffering Job never had to contend with the prospect of back-to-back to snowstorms such as Baltimore faces this week. After dumping almost three feet of frozen precipitation around the metro region over the weekend, forecasters say the heavens are set to open again Tuesday with at least another five or six inches, maybe more. That hardly seems fair. Deniers of global warming are apt to look at the deluge as proof that climate change is a hoax, as if scientists weren't talking about a gradual increase in average temperatures but a new weather system in which it would be 70 degrees out in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 18, 2003
They're two of the most affecting storytellers in jazz. Ramsey Lewis engages you with his piano; Nancy Wilson enchants you with her sultry voice. Together, the legends imbue melodies and lyrics with an easeful brightness. The pair has shared musical conversations on other projects -- 1984's Two of Us and last year's Meant to Be. They meet again on Simple Pleasures, a new duet album brimming with elegance, professionalism and thoughtful arrangements. "After doing concerts with Nancy last year," says Lewis, calling from his Chicago home, "we just built on what we had. We just felt that we had the material, so we just said, 'Why not do another album?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2004
Remember when you were a kid, and your parents would pile everyone in the car for a Sunday drive? The neighborhood you knew so well would give way to neighborhoods you'd never seen. And eventually those might give way to back country roads where most of the scenery involved vast fields of corn and the occasional herd of farm animals. If everyone behaved, there was usually a reward along the way, like an ice cream cone or a frosty milkshake. We can't make any promises about the scenery.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 5, 2004
Former college roommates Miles and Jack, both firmly ensconced in middle age and enduring the myriad crises that station in life inevitably entails, have embarked on a tour of California's wine country. For reluctant divorcee Miles, the trip is a chance to maybe finally move past his failed marriage and a present to his longtime bud, an opportunity for last-chance bonding before Jack's impending nuptials. For veteran bachelor Jack, it's a chance to sow some final wild oats. For audiences, Sideways is a voyage of rediscovery, a chance to revel in the simple pleasures - too often forgotten in this age of cinematic blockbusters - of a film that celebrates the intricacies of life in ways both splendid and mundane, revealing it all with unflinching honesty.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
Plagued though he was by misfortune of (literally) biblical proportions, even the long-suffering Job never had to contend with the prospect of back-to-back to snowstorms such as Baltimore faces this week. After dumping almost three feet of frozen precipitation around the metro region over the weekend, forecasters say the heavens are set to open again Tuesday with at least another five or six inches, maybe more. That hardly seems fair. Deniers of global warming are apt to look at the deluge as proof that climate change is a hoax, as if scientists weren't talking about a gradual increase in average temperatures but a new weather system in which it would be 70 degrees out in January.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | March 4, 2009
Lumpy, bumpy and hopelessly old-fashioned, the oatmeal cookie lacks any semblance of foodie street cred. Panache? Style? Decadence? Modest oatmeal's got none of that. But its very plainness, its unabashedly humble stance, could explain the very reason people seem to love oatmeal cookies a teensy bit more than all the rest. America, it seems, loves an underdog. Even in a cookie. And in oatmeal, people have got their Cinderella. When The Baltimore Sun put out a call last year for holiday cookie recipes, editors were surprised to see quite a few spins on the traditional oatmeal cookie.
TRAVEL
By Doyle McManus and Doyle McManus,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
The winemakers of Beaujolais are not happy this year. That seems odd, considering they live in some of France's most beautiful villages, where old stone houses are decked with flowers amid hillside vineyards heavy with grapes, a half-day's drive south of Paris. But to hear the growers tell it, the world is in a perilous state. New wines from Australia are flooding the market, even in France. The cost of labor -- each grower hires students, retirees and migrant workers to pick the grapes -- keeps going up every fall.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
They've given the famous Man in the Yellow Hat a name (Ted), but otherwise all is as it should be in the world of Curious George, a winsome big-screen adaptation of H.A. and Margret Rey's tales of a mischievous monkey and his innocent adventures. The animated film, which adds a few modern touches (a cell phone, for instance), but generally remains true to the original stories, introduces us to George in his native Africa. There, the little guy is a crowd favorite, charming, inquisitive, always with a smile on his face.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 5, 2004
Former college roommates Miles and Jack, both firmly ensconced in middle age and enduring the myriad crises that station in life inevitably entails, have embarked on a tour of California's wine country. For reluctant divorcee Miles, the trip is a chance to maybe finally move past his failed marriage and a present to his longtime bud, an opportunity for last-chance bonding before Jack's impending nuptials. For veteran bachelor Jack, it's a chance to sow some final wild oats. For audiences, Sideways is a voyage of rediscovery, a chance to revel in the simple pleasures - too often forgotten in this age of cinematic blockbusters - of a film that celebrates the intricacies of life in ways both splendid and mundane, revealing it all with unflinching honesty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2004
Remember when you were a kid, and your parents would pile everyone in the car for a Sunday drive? The neighborhood you knew so well would give way to neighborhoods you'd never seen. And eventually those might give way to back country roads where most of the scenery involved vast fields of corn and the occasional herd of farm animals. If everyone behaved, there was usually a reward along the way, like an ice cream cone or a frosty milkshake. We can't make any promises about the scenery.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | November 26, 1993
In one of the best "Saturday Night Live" sketches of all time, Hanukkah Harry fills in for a flu-stricken Santa Claus one Christmas Eve.The gentile kids waiting in front of the fireplace for Santa are disappointed when Hanukkah Harry drops in with a sackful of practical presents -- slacks, pajamas and the like -- instead of toys.He slaves all night, and this is the gratitude he gets? In honor of Harry, here are some Hanukkah gift ideas. After all, what could be more sensible than a book?* A fine introduction to the holiday is "A Great Miracle Happened There: A Chanukah Story" by Karla Kuskin, illustrated by Robert Andrew Parker (Willa Perlman Books, an imprint of HarperCollins, $15, 32 pages, ages 5-8)
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