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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Up the road five miles, at a mini-mart that didn't exist when she and her husband built their home in the rural town of Harwood, there's a big sale on. And Joyce Gillespie knows all about it. "[It's] milk — just $2.99 a gallon," says Gillespie, 52, as she straps on a helmet and hops on the conveyance that has gotten her pretty much wherever she has needed to go since 1979. Even on a day when the temperature will crack 100 degrees, a 10-mile round trip is nothing for Gillespie, a self-described shy farm girl best known along the roads of southern Anne Arundel County as "the Bike Lady."
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
For years after he took his last hit, Sammy Stewart dreamed the same dream. He'd climb a set of stairs under a dogwood tree, and at the top, a man would hand him some rocks of crack cocaine. Stewart would take them home and place them by his bedside as he prepared his tinfoil for smoking, a ritual he'd performed thousands of times. Just as he was ready to fire up, the prison loudspeaker would interject, blaring, "Chow time! Chow time!" He'd wake and spend the whole day angry.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
For years after he took his last hit, Sammy Stewart dreamed the same dream. He'd climb a set of stairs under a dogwood tree, and at the top, a man would hand him some rocks of crack cocaine. Stewart would take them home and place them by his bedside as he prepared his tinfoil for smoking, a ritual he'd performed thousands of times. Just as he was ready to fire up, the prison loudspeaker would interject, blaring, "Chow time! Chow time!" He'd wake and spend the whole day angry.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Up the road five miles, at a mini-mart that didn't exist when she and her husband built their home in the rural town of Harwood, there's a big sale on. And Joyce Gillespie knows all about it. "[It's] milk — just $2.99 a gallon," says Gillespie, 52, as she straps on a helmet and hops on the conveyance that has gotten her pretty much wherever she has needed to go since 1979. Even on a day when the temperature will crack 100 degrees, a 10-mile round trip is nothing for Gillespie, a self-described shy farm girl best known along the roads of southern Anne Arundel County as "the Bike Lady."
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | July 31, 2003
They've dressed the two Beverly Hills blondes in an American Gothic pose, complete with pitchfork, to promote the new Fox series The Simple Life. Not that dizzy socialite Paris Hilton and pal Nicole Richie would catch the Grant Wood reference - or be able to identify a pitchfork. In the oddly engaging reality series from the creators of MTV's The Real World, the laughs come from finding out just how isolated the overprivileged can be from the rest of the country. So much so that the 22-year-old Hilton, a fixture in society columns, doesn't quite know what a well is and has never heard of Wal-Mart.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2004
They'll always have Paris. The Eisners of Fallston had two visitors over the weekend - just two city gals with a hankering for Harford County life. On Thursday, a Greyhound tour bus pulled up to the Eisner homestead and out popped Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie of The Simple Life. Greeting the stars of Fox's reality show were Andy, Robyn, Josh, Cody and Kerri Eisner. On Thursday, the clock began ticking on the family's 15 minutes of fame. "The first thing we did was unload their luggage, which was quite a feat," says Andy Eisner, the dad. "I did it myself.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 2, 2003
There's nothing simple about The Simple Life, Fox TV's new reality series about two Beverly Hills jet-setters who move in with a farm family in the Ozarks. The show, which stars wealthy party girls Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie and premieres tonight, could be described as a reality-TV version of CBS' Green Acres, the 1965 sitcom about a Manhattan attorney (Eddie Albert) and his socialite wife (Eva Gabor) who move to a ramshackle farm outside the fictional town of Hooterville. Or it could be viewed as yet another reality TV series featuring whacked-out celebrities such as The Osbournes or The Anna Nicole Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 6, 2001
"It Takes a Village Idiot: Complicating the Simple Life," by Jim Mullen (Simon & Schuster, 220 pages, $23). Mullen, an inveterate Manhattanite, a writer responsible for among other things, the "Hot Sheet" irony column in EntertainmentWeekly, shocked himself and virtually all who knew him by moving into the dairy farming country of the upstate New York Catskills. This mook is a fanciful memoir of the experience, a respectful if often awed tapestry of observations of the fundamental differences between modern city living and traditional agrarian existence.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 26, 2005
Who says prime-time television never deals with differences in social class? Consider this moment from the third season premiere of The Simple Life: Interns, as job skills-impaired Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie climb into overalls to start work at a Quality Auto Muffler Center in Bayonne, N.J.: "So, is this, like, blue collar or white collar?" Hilton asks, complaining about having to wear "polyester" without underwear. "This is blue," Richie says with a degree of certainty remarkable for her. "And, like, white is better?"
NEWS
December 25, 1995
CUTS IN Medicaid? Farm subsidies at risk? Food stamps and welfare woes? Don't bother the Old Order Amish with these problems.While these plain, self-sufficient people -- many of whom live in Western and Southern Maryland and near Lancaster, Pa. -- pay income taxes, they don't otherwise pay much attention to a government other taxpayers like to revile. They don't need to. By depending on themselves and their fellow Amish, they live virtually independent lives. They don't need Medicaid, Medicare or any number or other government benefits.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,Special to The Sun | May 21, 2008
Millard H. Wilson Jr. was, by all accounts, a humble man who never sought attention. Nearly a year after the former telephone repairman's death at age 69, he's suddenly getting plenty of attention - with more to come. Wilson, a Severna Park resident who retired after 35 years with the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., left an astonishing legacy to Baltimore Washington Medical Center: an estate valued at more than $2 million. Officials at the Glen Burnie hospital, who announced the donation last week, will place his name on a plaque in the critical-care unit of the patient tower under construction, part of a $117 million building project scheduled for completion early next year.
NEWS
By Garrison Kellor | June 7, 2007
I bought a jar of elderberry jelly and an armload of rhubarb at a small-town festival last week, simply because the seller was a slender, fair-haired, luminous beauty who happened to be Amish, sitting, demure in a black bonnet, at a table beside her horse and buggy. There was a time I would've pitied her for her stern upbringing and all the deprivations thereof, but nowadays I tend to pity the children of heedless parents. Great romantic visionaries who leave a trail of messed-up progeny and embittered lovers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | May 7, 2007
Let us now examine the strange case of poor Paris Hilton, who has been in the news again and not, you'll be shocked to know, for winning Young Humanitarian of the Year. Maybe you heard: Poor Paris is going to the slammer. A judge in Los Angeles sentenced the serial-partying heiress to 45 days in the county jail for violating her probation after a reckless driving arrest last September in which she appeared intoxicated and failed a field sobriety test. It was thought the judge might give her a break and sentence her to work release or home detention or brushing the ponies at the local polo club for a couple of hours, but it was not to be. Still, 45 days in a women's jail is not considered hard time.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Paris Hilton's hacked-into cell phone last month contained the phone numbers of Eminem, Lindsay Lohan, Vin Diesel, Christina Aguilera - and 7-year-old Josh Eisner of Fallston. Yes, that Josh Eisner, whose connection to the hotel heiress will become apparent on tonight's episode of Hilton's reality show, The Simple Life. Beginning at 4:30 a.m. Feb. 20, the Eisner family of Fallston started receiving 30 calls an hour from around the world. Are you famous? Why are YOU in Paris Hilton's phone book?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 26, 2005
Who says prime-time television never deals with differences in social class? Consider this moment from the third season premiere of The Simple Life: Interns, as job skills-impaired Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie climb into overalls to start work at a Quality Auto Muffler Center in Bayonne, N.J.: "So, is this, like, blue collar or white collar?" Hilton asks, complaining about having to wear "polyester" without underwear. "This is blue," Richie says with a degree of certainty remarkable for her. "And, like, white is better?"
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2004
They'll always have Paris. The Eisners of Fallston had two visitors over the weekend - just two city gals with a hankering for Harford County life. On Thursday, a Greyhound tour bus pulled up to the Eisner homestead and out popped Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie of The Simple Life. Greeting the stars of Fox's reality show were Andy, Robyn, Josh, Cody and Kerri Eisner. On Thursday, the clock began ticking on the family's 15 minutes of fame. "The first thing we did was unload their luggage, which was quite a feat," says Andy Eisner, the dad. "I did it myself.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | November 7, 1999
I DON'T KNOW ABOUT you, but I need to simplify my life.I have too many to-do lists, too many piles of paperwork. I have too many errands to run, too many calls to return and too many bills to pay. My day timer is more important to me than my marriage.Elaine St. James needed to simplify her life, too. After she did, she wrote a book about the process of giving things up and throwing things away, doing less and making do with less.The book was called "Simplify Your Life," and it was a big success.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 11, 1996
COLONIA LUZ Y ESPERANZA, Paraguay -- The name of this Mennonite colony, set amid the red-dirt soybean fields and palm trees of rural eastern Paraguay, is Light and Hope. But there is little of either.Land-hungry peasants toting shotguns have come into the colony's fields, seeking to evict the American-born Mennonites from the land.The Rev. Philip Eichorn, the colony's minister and leader, has been shot at and forced to get police protection. Thefts of everything from farm equipment to animals are rampant.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 16, 2004
The difference might not seem like much. In The Simple Life last year, Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie - stripped of credit cards, cell phones and cash - left Beverly Hills to live with a farm family in Arkansas. It was supposed to be The Beverly Hillbillies in reverse, or Green Acres gone blond. In The Simple Life 2: Road Trip, which premieres tonight on Fox, Hilton and Richie travel from Miami Beach to Beverly Hills (again without credit cards, cell phones or cash), living with several families along the way. It's supposed to be a screwball Thelma & Louise without social conscience or feminist politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aline Mendelsohn and Aline Mendelsohn,Orlando Sentinel | February 29, 2004
KISSIMMEE -- Steven Shaver is describing himself as a Pentecostal married man who allows no R-rated movies in his St. Cloud home. And yet here he is, in a meeting room at Osceola Heritage Park, volunteering to host a pair of party girls -- one of whom was involved in a notorious X-rated sex-tape scandal. Shaver is presenting his down-home credentials at a casting call for The Simple Life 2, the second incarnation of the Fox reality show that places coddled Los Angeles socialites Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie in a rural, small-town setting.
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