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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2004
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - They came in blue jeans and old cut-off shorts. They wore somber black suits and Korean War-era uniforms. They were from central California, Massachusetts and the suburbs of Maryland. Yesterday, busloads of mourners poured into the presidential library where the body of former President Ronald Reagan lay, beginning a week of mourning from coast to coast. "I thought it was a moving experience. We loved him as a president," said Ron Ahlquist, 61, of Tewksbury, Mass.
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NEWS
By Amanda Covarrubias and Amanda Covarrubias,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2004
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - They came quietly yesterday to gaze upon the curved, limestone memorial that marks the grave of former President Ronald Reagan. After a week of mourning, visitors continued to pay homage to the nation's 40th president and his widow, Nancy, on the first day the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum overlooking the Simi Valley opened to the public since his death June 5. All the tributes and speeches were over. Instead, visitors laid flowers and American flags on a table, signed condolence books and admired the hilltop view of a green farm valley ringed by golden mountains.
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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 8, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Federal prosecutors in the Rodney King beating trial continue their case this week in anticipation of the one witness who never publicly has given his account: the victim himself.Speculation is rampant about the effect of Mr. King's testimony on the trial of four white Los Angeles police officers in the March 3, 1991, videotaped beating of Mr. King during his arrest for traffic violations. The four face up to 10 years in prison and $250,000 in fines if convicted of violating Mr. King's civil rights.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2004
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - They came in blue jeans and old cut-off shorts. They wore somber black suits and Korean War-era uniforms. They were from central California, Massachusetts and the suburbs of Maryland. Yesterday, busloads of mourners poured into the presidential library where the body of former President Ronald Reagan lay, beginning a week of mourning from coast to coast. "I thought it was a moving experience. We loved him as a president," said Ron Ahlquist, 61, of Tewksbury, Mass.
NEWS
By Amanda Covarrubias and Amanda Covarrubias,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2004
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - They came quietly yesterday to gaze upon the curved, limestone memorial that marks the grave of former President Ronald Reagan. After a week of mourning, visitors continued to pay homage to the nation's 40th president and his widow, Nancy, on the first day the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum overlooking the Simi Valley opened to the public since his death June 5. All the tributes and speeches were over. Instead, visitors laid flowers and American flags on a table, signed condolence books and admired the hilltop view of a green farm valley ringed by golden mountains.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | May 3, 1992
High on any list of the most cherished beliefs held by Americans is this one: The belief that in meting out justice, our system works because it is based on judgments rendered by "a jury of one's peers."And, truth be told, we have in the Rodney King case a good example of how a jury of one's peers worked well to acquit the four white Los Angeles police officers involved in the videotaped beating of King, a black man.Indeed, it was almost a perfect fit, peer-wise, between the jurors and the accused officers: Twelve jurors -- none of them black and one of them the brother of a retired Los Angeles police sergeant -- all selected from Simi Valley, an overwhelmingly white community that is home to many retired firefighters and policemen.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 19, 1994
If you want some insight into why so many Americans think it's OK for Singapore to cane Michael Fay, go to a high school baseball game in Simi Valley, Calif.It's out of the way, but you might enjoy the trip.Simi Valley is a mostly middle-class suburb outside Los Angeles. It's a place like many other places. Sure, there was a bit of unwelcome notoriety when a jury of 12 of its citizens was somehow unable to discern that Rodney King had been viciously beaten by a mob of L.A. cops.But, basically, Simi Valley is a typical slice of America.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 7, 1992
Los Angeles. -- This is a place where mellow has hardened with anxiety and laid-back has acquired an edge. Southern California, the place where people came to get away from it all, now has it all. Unemployment at 9.5. An earthquake at 6.1. A riot at $785 million.Since World War II, Americans from Iowa and New York have packed up and moved to California. If there was one place to find the American dream of a fresh start and an easier life -- a dream shaped by balmy weather and by Hollywood -- it was in this stretch of land at the edge of the continent.
NEWS
April 29, 2003
On Saturday, April 26, 2003 ROSEANN (Richardson) SHORES, 77, of Ocean View, DE, died at Harbor Healthcare Center, Lewes, DE. Formerly a teacher in the Baltimore County Public School System and at Towson University. Survived by beloved husband William Thomas Shores; beloved children - Jody (Shores) Waters of Lutherville, MD; and W. Thomas Shores of Simi Valley, CA; and four grandsons. Memorial Services at Parsell Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Clarksville Chapel, Rts. 26 & 17, Clarksville, DE, 10 A.M. Saturday, May 3, 2003.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
GEORGE K. OTIS, 90 Led Christian radio network George K. Otis, a millionaire-turned-evangelist who built Christian radio stations around the globe, died July 22 in his sleep at his Murrieta, Calif., home. Mr. Otis founded several companies and was an executive at several others, including serving a stint as general manager of the LearJet Corp. aerospace firm. He was a millionaire by the time he was 35 but was dissatisfied. His Simi Valley-based ministry created the Voice of Hope, a radio network offering religious programming in more than a dozen languages.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 19, 1994
If you want some insight into why so many Americans think it's OK for Singapore to cane Michael Fay, go to a high school baseball game in Simi Valley, Calif.It's out of the way, but you might enjoy the trip.Simi Valley is a mostly middle-class suburb outside Los Angeles. It's a place like many other places. Sure, there was a bit of unwelcome notoriety when a jury of 12 of its citizens was somehow unable to discern that Rodney King had been viciously beaten by a mob of L.A. cops.But, basically, Simi Valley is a typical slice of America.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 8, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Federal prosecutors in the Rodney King beating trial continue their case this week in anticipation of the one witness who never publicly has given his account: the victim himself.Speculation is rampant about the effect of Mr. King's testimony on the trial of four white Los Angeles police officers in the March 3, 1991, videotaped beating of Mr. King during his arrest for traffic violations. The four face up to 10 years in prison and $250,000 in fines if convicted of violating Mr. King's civil rights.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 7, 1992
Los Angeles. -- This is a place where mellow has hardened with anxiety and laid-back has acquired an edge. Southern California, the place where people came to get away from it all, now has it all. Unemployment at 9.5. An earthquake at 6.1. A riot at $785 million.Since World War II, Americans from Iowa and New York have packed up and moved to California. If there was one place to find the American dream of a fresh start and an easier life -- a dream shaped by balmy weather and by Hollywood -- it was in this stretch of land at the edge of the continent.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | May 3, 1992
High on any list of the most cherished beliefs held by Americans is this one: The belief that in meting out justice, our system works because it is based on judgments rendered by "a jury of one's peers."And, truth be told, we have in the Rodney King case a good example of how a jury of one's peers worked well to acquit the four white Los Angeles police officers involved in the videotaped beating of King, a black man.Indeed, it was almost a perfect fit, peer-wise, between the jurors and the accused officers: Twelve jurors -- none of them black and one of them the brother of a retired Los Angeles police sergeant -- all selected from Simi Valley, an overwhelmingly white community that is home to many retired firefighters and policemen.
NEWS
April 16, 2003
EVA LEE MORTON, 79, died on Wednesday, March 12, 2003, at her daughter's home in Texas. Eva enjoyed a notable career in administrative nursing during the many years that she lived in Baltimore. Ms. Morton is survived by a son, Michael, now residing in Prospect Harbor, ME., another son, Elijah, of Simi Valley, CA., and one daughter, Robin Robinson-Baca, of Austin, TX. She also leaves a sister, Mrs. Virginia Peace, of Ocala, FL., brother Richard Nippell, also of Ocala, and brother Clifford, of Ohio.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 24, 1992
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Municipal bond issuers announced yesterday the early redemption of four issues totaling more than $17.6 million.0 The issues being called are: * San Bernardino Housing Authority, Calif., Series 1985 A, multiple-family housing revenue bonds maturing Aug. 1, 2005. $350,000 called at par on Aug. 3, 1992 for sinking fund.* Simi Valley, Calif., Series 1984, single family mortgage revenue bonds maturing Feb. 1, 1993, through Aug. 1, 1999, Aug. 1, 2008, and Aug. 1, 2017. All outstanding bonds called at par on Aug. 1, 1992.
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