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NEWS
February 4, 2007
In the early 1770s many members of the Pennsylvania Quaker community moved to the Darlington area of Harford County. Among them was the Warner family, which gained prominence as clock makers, silversmiths and millers. Thomas Warner helped establish a silversmith business in Darlington and moved with the family to Baltimore at age 19. With his brother Andrew, Thomas created a legacy of silver craftsmanship whose value was later recognized by the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Maryland Historical Society and the Arts Institute of Chicago.
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NEWS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2009
From the time Henry Hopkins III ("Hoppy" to all who know him) was 15, he worked in his dad's Mount Vernon silversmith's shop. A former carriage house built in 1897, the building was converted to a shop in 1936, with an apartment above in the space that had been the hayloft. Hopkins loved the neighborhood so much that when he graduated from high school in northern Baltimore County, he fulfilled his dream of living close to work and to the Maryland Institute College of Art, where he enrolled in fine arts.
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NEWS
May 31, 2007
Walter V. Harrison Jr., a retired silversmith, died Monday of complications from a stroke at Stella Maris Hospice. The Cedarcroft resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Abell Avenue, he was a 1939 City College graduate and served in the Army during World War II. He owned and operated a flower shop on Charles Street near Pennsylvania Station before joining Samuel Kirk & Sons as a silver repairer at its 25th Street plant. He later worked at the Kirk department at the old Stewart's department store at Howard and Lexington streets, and he retired as a cook at St. Vincent's Child Care Center in Timonium in 1991.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Patricia A. Roberts, a retired Environmental Protection Agency lawyer and an acknowledged expert on Maryland silver who volunteered at the Maryland Historical Society, died of multiple myeloma Dec. 10 at George Washington University Hospital in Washington. She was 66. Ms. Roberts was born in Baltimore and raised on Baker Street. She was a 1960 graduate of Western High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Morgan State University in 1964. After college, Ms. Roberts began working at the National Institutes of Health's laboratory on cerebral metabolism in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Joseph S. Student, who was one of the last practitioners in Baltimore of the ancient craft of hand sculpting sterling silver holloware, died May 12 of heart failure at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 86.As a youngster in West Baltimore, Mr. Student became fascinated with a neighbor who was a hand-chaser at Samuel Kirk & Sons, the famed Baltimore silversmiths.After Mr. Student expressed an interest in learning the esoteric art, the neighbor arranged an apprenticeship at Kirk's plant at Kirk Avenue and 25th Street, and the 14-year-old school dropout began his career in 1924 as all hand-chasers do: by sweeping the shop floor.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2000
The old Kirk-Stieff silversmith building in Baltimore will be given new life as a high-tech office building, the developer that recently purchased the building said yesterday. The 80,000-square-foot building overlooking the Jones Falls Valley has been purchased by Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse Inc. for $1.5 million. When renovations are completed in the first quarter of next year, the 72-year-old building will be marketed as multitenant office space. Much of the architectural character of the structure, including its high ceilings and wood floors, will be retained.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
From his home and tavern just off Church Circle in Annapolis, silversmith William Faris quietly observed life in the 18th-century town and dutifully jotted down notes every day. A cloudey drissely dissagreeable day, he inked in a haphazard, spidery script fraught with misspellings. Or, Lent my Pistoles and Holsters to Jesse DuWees, who is going to Baltimore to defend him self as thare is Highway men on the road. Over the last 12 years and eight months of his life -- from Jan. 1, 1792, to Aug. 9, 1804 -- Faris scrawled many everyday observations into a brown, muslin-bound book.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer and Neil A. Grauer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 10, 2000
Rod Hingston knows the America's Cup inside out -- literally. Not the strategies of the great yachting competition, but the 27-inch-tall, 16-pound sterling silver America's Cup trophy itself. Without Hingston's extraordinary skills as a silversmith, the sailors who begin battle Feb. 19 for the oldest trophy in international sports would have had no actual cup to compete for. Hingston, 56, a short, shy, one-time amateur boxer, single-handedly saved the America's Cup. He restored it after its near-destruction by a sledgehammer-wielding political protester who battered it repeatedly during an attack in March 1997 at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron Clubhouse in Auckland.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | April 2, 2006
The gleaming silver coffeepot, with its elegantly turned lid and ornately carved wooden handle, still looks as new as it did on the day it was made more than 200 years ago. One can almost smell the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee wafting from its gracefully curved spout. No matter that this pot, meticulously hand-crafted by an Annapolis silversmith for a wealthy Maryland family, is now far too valuable for everyday use. It still bespeaks a world of gracious living in splendid homes, and of culture, luxury and ease.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
ONE OF THE most prominent landmarks of Baltimore's Jones Falls Valley, the former Kirk-Stieff silversmith building at 800 Wyman Park Drive, will soon have new occupants. The architectural firm of Grieves, Worrall, Wright and O'Hatnick, now at 5 E. Read St. in Mount Vernon, plans to move its offices to the second floor of the Stieff Silver building by early next year. Now in the final stages of negotiating a multiyear lease for its new space, Grieves is the first tenant to be announced for the Stieff building, which dates from 1928 and contains 40,000 square feet of space.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
The hammer hits the metal with well-placed strikes. Plink, plink, plink. In our mass-produced, throw-it-away society, it's tempting to hear the sound as the quaint signature of yet another dying art. But at her studio in an old Baltimore carriage house, silversmith Martha Hopkins has a more optimistic view as she begins fashioning six silver bar measures used for mixing drinks. To this 48-year-old artisan, the sound is the heartbeat of a craft that, while fading, still has a lot of life left beyond the nostalgic trappings of Colonial Williamsburg.
NEWS
May 31, 2007
Walter V. Harrison Jr., a retired silversmith, died Monday of complications from a stroke at Stella Maris Hospice. The Cedarcroft resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Abell Avenue, he was a 1939 City College graduate and served in the Army during World War II. He owned and operated a flower shop on Charles Street near Pennsylvania Station before joining Samuel Kirk & Sons as a silver repairer at its 25th Street plant. He later worked at the Kirk department at the old Stewart's department store at Howard and Lexington streets, and he retired as a cook at St. Vincent's Child Care Center in Timonium in 1991.
NEWS
February 4, 2007
In the early 1770s many members of the Pennsylvania Quaker community moved to the Darlington area of Harford County. Among them was the Warner family, which gained prominence as clock makers, silversmiths and millers. Thomas Warner helped establish a silversmith business in Darlington and moved with the family to Baltimore at age 19. With his brother Andrew, Thomas created a legacy of silver craftsmanship whose value was later recognized by the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Maryland Historical Society and the Arts Institute of Chicago.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | April 2, 2006
The gleaming silver coffeepot, with its elegantly turned lid and ornately carved wooden handle, still looks as new as it did on the day it was made more than 200 years ago. One can almost smell the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee wafting from its gracefully curved spout. No matter that this pot, meticulously hand-crafted by an Annapolis silversmith for a wealthy Maryland family, is now far too valuable for everyday use. It still bespeaks a world of gracious living in splendid homes, and of culture, luxury and ease.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
THROUGH TODAY MIXED MEDIA SHOW Pottery by Susan Wertheimer David, watercolors by Donna Fink and abstract paintings by Phil Gurlik will be on view at the Galleries at Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet Waters Park Road, Annapolis, through today. Regular hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. 410-222-1777 or friendsofquietwaterspark.org. VIEWING STONES Japanese viewing stones collected from around the world by members of the Potomac Viewing Stone Group are on display through today at the U.S. National Arboretum, National Bonsai and Penjing Museum, 3501 New York Ave. N.E., Washington.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2004
Samuel Kirk Millspaugh, the last president of Baltimore's oldest family-owned silversmith company, died Friday of complications from cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ruxton resident was 73. Born in Columbus, Ohio, Mr. Millspaugh was the great-great-grandson of Samuel Kirk, a Philadelphia-trained silversmith who in 1815 opened a shop at 106 Baltimore St. and quickly began hammering out some of the country's most coveted tea urns, pitchers and handcrafted tableware. Kirk silver was especially admired for its raised decorations, a style known as "repousse" and later as "Baltimore silver."
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | May 16, 1993
The sheer scope of de Lamerie's work (over 1,000 example have passed through Christie's alone, according to the auctioneer's records) points to the master silversmith operating an extensive workshop employing specialists to execute his designs. De Lamerie also apparently operated a retail shop, selling jewelry and silver from open stock and adding his hallmark and the recipient's or buyer's coat of arms after an item was selected.It seems he also was a notorious tax evader, selling wares without his hallmark in order to avoid his guild's levies.
NEWS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2009
From the time Henry Hopkins III ("Hoppy" to all who know him) was 15, he worked in his dad's Mount Vernon silversmith's shop. A former carriage house built in 1897, the building was converted to a shop in 1936, with an apartment above in the space that had been the hayloft. Hopkins loved the neighborhood so much that when he graduated from high school in northern Baltimore County, he fulfilled his dream of living close to work and to the Maryland Institute College of Art, where he enrolled in fine arts.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2004
In the 18th century, England protected its export market of silverware in the colonies by not exporting raw silver. So Annapolis silversmiths were forced to reuse old silver for their creations, and they became experts at producing small pieces of flatware, especially spoons. Considering the ease with which flatware disappeared over the centuries, it is remarkable that there are 11 known pieces of silver by renowned Annapolis silversmith Charles Faris in existence. Four Faris tablespoons and a ladle are in the Historic Annapolis Foundation's silver exhibit, Maryland's First Silver: 18th Century Annapolis Silver, at this weekend's Historic Annapolis Antiques Show.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
ONE OF THE most prominent landmarks of Baltimore's Jones Falls Valley, the former Kirk-Stieff silversmith building at 800 Wyman Park Drive, will soon have new occupants. The architectural firm of Grieves, Worrall, Wright and O'Hatnick, now at 5 E. Read St. in Mount Vernon, plans to move its offices to the second floor of the Stieff Silver building by early next year. Now in the final stages of negotiating a multiyear lease for its new space, Grieves is the first tenant to be announced for the Stieff building, which dates from 1928 and contains 40,000 square feet of space.
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