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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's cartoon on LBJ's legacy is so far off the mark that it fails to be remotely humorous ( "Dogged opposition," April 13). He uses two presidents, each tainted by their racism and prejudice, to paint the tea party as racist. Lyndon B. Johnson was morally bankrupt, accepting a Silver Star and wearing it the rest of his life when, in truth, he never earned it. The Silver Star is only earned for valor in combat, and LBJ was never in combat. He served briefly in the Pacific Theatre of World War II but was never exposed to enemy contact.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and By Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - As an Army Ranger and Green Beret, Sgt. Maj. Rick Lamb has seen his share of action. He was shot at in 1989 while taking part in the capture of Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega and suffered a serious head wound rescuing fellow soldiers from the dusty hell of Somalia seven years ago. But it was supposedly mundane sentry duty in Korea 16 years ago that just earned him one of the nation's highest medals for valor. The Army awarded Lamb and three former soldiers the Silver Star this month for engaging in a fierce firefight with North Korean troops and saving a Soviet defector on the day after Thanksgiving in 1984.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1997
A former Carroll County budget analyst, convicted in two counties of stealing medals and awards from eight war heroes or their survivors, was freed yesterday after serving about one-fourth of a six-year sentence.Stephen V. Pyne, 37, of Westminster had his sentence modified less than 24 hours before Earl D. Leppo, one of his victims, was to be presented a duplicate Silver Star to replace one that has never been recovered.Pyne operated a scheme from 1990 to 1995 in which he offered to have military decorations for veterans or their widows encased PTC in a glass display box, said prosecutor Jerry F. Barnes, state's attorney for Carroll County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
Moses N. Glushakow, a sculptor, art teacher and decorated World War II veteran, died Tuesday of heart failure at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Stevensville resident was 78. Born and raised in East Baltimore, Mr. Glushakow, known as Moe, was the brother of Jacob Glushakow, the noted Baltimore painter of urban scenes, who died in 2000. Mr. Glushakow was an accomplished artist in his own right and enjoyed sculpting busts and drawing. Family members said he was known for making exact copies of Leonardo DaVinci's drawings.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Julian Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian Barnes,Los Angeles Times | March 27, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Military officers knew a day after the death of Army Ranger Pat Tillman in Afghanistan that the former NFL star's killing was probably caused by friendly fire, but led Tillman's family to believe he was shot by Afghan insurgents for more than a month before coming clean. According to a Pentagon inspector general's report issued yesterday, nine officers, from battlefield commanders to the three-star general in charge of elite Army Special Operations units, were aware of the friendly fire incident even when Tillman was publicly awarded a Silver Star that posthumously commended him for valor in the face of an enemy attack.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1995
An officer who grabbed a woman jumping from the 21st floor of a Towson condominium will receive the Baltimore County Police Department's Medal of Honor -- its highest award -- at a commendations ceremony tonight.The Silver Star, the department's second-highest honor, is being awarded to five other policemen, while three people who helped make arrests will receive Citizen Valor Awards in the 6:30 p.m. program at Goucher College.Receiving the Medal of Honor is Officer Joseph E. Yeater, whose quick action saved a despondent, 39-year-old woman from death when she jumped over a balcony railing at Towson Towers on Allegheny Avenue.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 3, 2004
IF JOHN KERRY wins in November, he won't be the first president who was awarded a Silver Star medal for "gallantry in action against an enemy." And he won't be the first president who used the medal to be elected to high office. And he won't be the first president whose medal was called illegitimate. He'd be the second in all those categories. The only Silver Star president was Lyndon B. Johnson. A journalist once characterized Mr. Johnson's medal as "one of the least deserved but most often displayed Silver Stars in American military history."
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
As a senior in high school outside Pittsburgh, Ed Malinowski was the quarterback on an undefeated team. His parents were both English teachers. So when he entered the Naval Academy during his plebe summer in 1998, he wasn't thinking much beyond playing football and getting an English degree. Like a popular Navy recruiting ad once said, Malinowski figured his post-graduation military commitment was going to be spent seeing the world. When Bryce McDonald entered the academy the following year, his mission seemed clear.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
James J. Cadden, a retired Baltimore police homicide detective and highly decorated World War II veteran, died Monday of a swallowing disorder at his Cockeysville home. He was 88. The son of a construction owner and a homemaker, James Joseph Cadden was born and raised in the former 10th Ward in Baltimore. He attended the old St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church parochial school on Valley Street and then attended city public schools. He left school in the ninth grade and later earned his General Education Development diploma.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Edward H. "Ham" Welbourn Jr., a retired insurance executive and World War II veteran, died April 29 of complications from dementia at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 98. The son of Edward H. Welbourn, who owned Rennous Kleinle Brush Manufacturers in Catonsville, and Emma Dawson Welbourn, a homemaker, Edward Hambleton Welbourn was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. After graduating in 1934 from the Gilman School, Mr. Welbourn enrolled at Haverford College, where he was a government major and earned a bachelor's degree in 1938.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
As a senior in high school outside Pittsburgh, Ed Malinowski was the quarterback on an undefeated team. His parents were both English teachers. So when he entered the Naval Academy during his plebe summer in 1998, he wasn't thinking much beyond playing football and getting an English degree. Like a popular Navy recruiting ad once said, Malinowski figured his post-graduation military commitment was going to be spent seeing the world. When Bryce McDonald entered the academy the following year, his mission seemed clear.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | February 9, 2010
Navy basketball center David Robinson and Delaware lacrosse player Alex Smith (Boys' Latin) were named among the Colonial Athletic Association's 25 Silver Stars - students who have had the greatest impact on the conference in the past 25 years. Robinson, who played for the Midshipmen from 1983 to 1987, was the Associated Press Player of the Year, Naismith Player of the Year and Wooden Award winner in 1987. The CAA's all-time leader in points (2,669), rebounds (1,314) and blocked shots (516)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
Walter Jennings Ives, a decorated Army Air Forces pilot who flew 34 missions over Germany aboard Martin B-26 Marauder bombers during World War II, died Dec. 3 of complications from a stroke at Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. The longtime Riderwood resident was 93. Mr. Ives was born in Baltimore and raised in a rowhouse in the 2800 block of N. Calvert St. He was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he played lacrosse and football. After studying mechanical engineering at Cornell University, Mr. Ives enlisted as a private in the Maryland National Guard 29th Infantry Division, 175th Regiment in 1935.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
Walter Jennings Ives, a decorated Army Air Forces pilot who flew 34 missions over Germany aboard Martin B-26 Marauder bombers during World War II, died Dec. 3 of complications from a stroke at Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. The longtime Riderwood resident was 93. Mr. Ives was born in Baltimore and raised in a rowhouse in the 2800 block of N. Calvert St. He was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he played lacrosse and football. After studying mechanical engineering at Cornell University, Mr. Ives enlisted as a private in the Maryland National Guard 29th Infantry Division, 175th Regiment in 1935.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | December 9, 2007
On a clear night last spring in Afghanistan's eastern mountains, a U.S. infantry platoon went looking for an al-Qaida operative named Habib Jan, and they found him. Outside an abandoned village clinging to a rocky hillside, the platoon was ambushed in a rain of deadly rifle and machine gun fire. Twenty-seven Americans and five Afghan Army fighters together fought 90 or 100 of Habib Jan's Islamist extremists. For 17 hours, the American platoon was pinned down. Bullets snapped and hissed as the enemy slowly closed in. Ammunition ran low. Water ran out. Sniper rounds plucked at the soldiers' helmets and sleeves and drilled through boots as they shifted and returned fire.
NEWS
August 8, 2004
FROM A TACTICAL standpoint, it makes some sense for backers of President Bush to run campaign ads questioning the military heroism of Democratic challenger John Kerry. The comfort level Americans feel with Mr. Bush as their commander in chief is currently his greatest advantage over Senator Kerry in the presidential campaign. President Bush can't afford to let Mr. Kerry succeed in his drive to use his decorated wartime service to neutralize that advantage. Even if the claims of the anti-Kerry veterans featured in one ad are "dishonest and dishonorable," as Republican Sen. John McCain charged, they raise questions that inevitably make the challenger's job of winning voter confidence more difficult.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | December 15, 2009
The San Antonio Silver Stars selected former Maryland star Laura Harper with the fifth pick in the WNBA dispersal draft of Sacramento Monarchs players. Harper, a 6-foot-5 forward-center, was selected 10th overall by Sacramento in the 2008 college draft and played two seasons for the Monarchs, averaging 5.0 points, 3.7 rebounds and 15.2 minutes. She was 15th in the league in offensive rebounds in 2009 with 68. Harper played four seasons with the Terps, finishing her career ranked fourth all-time in career rebounds (873)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
George Dayton Dodge, a mechanic and former fleet manager for the H&S Baking Co. who earned two Silver Stars in combat during the Korean War, died of cancer May 22 at a daughter's Dundalk home. He was 80. Mr. Dodge was born in Terra Alta, W.Va., and raised in Oakland, Garrett County. He enlisted in the Army in 1946, and served from 1950 to 1951 as a staff sergeant with the 195th Ordnance Depot Company near Korea's 38th Parallel, where he experienced fierce enemy action. "I was in two active fire fights.
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