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By Laura Vozzella | August 12, 2011
State Comptroller Peter Franchot is going to the farmers' market Sunday. This is news, I'd suggest, because he's bypassing the market near his Takoma Park home for the one under the JFX in Baltimore. Sounds like a man seeking votes, in the 2014 governor's race, as much as native produce. "You don't think he has a natural craving for cantaloupe and hand-picked silver queen corn?" Franchot's Chief of Staff, Len Foxwell, said when I bounced that theory off him. Franchot was the only big-name gubernatorial wannabe who schlepped to Crisfield earlier this summer for the annual Tawes crab-and-politics fest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | August 12, 2011
State Comptroller Peter Franchot is going to the farmers' market Sunday. This is news, I'd suggest, because he's bypassing the market near his Takoma Park home for the one under the JFX in Baltimore. Sounds like a man seeking votes, in the 2014 governor's race, as much as native produce. "You don't think he has a natural craving for cantaloupe and hand-picked silver queen corn?" Franchot's Chief of Staff, Len Foxwell, said when I bounced that theory off him. Franchot was the only big-name gubernatorial wannabe who schlepped to Crisfield earlier this summer for the annual Tawes crab-and-politics fest.
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NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
In corn-crazy Maryland, especially in corn-rich August, the sweet-corn disciples have worshiped for years at the throne of the exalted corn queen. The queen, of course, was Silver Queen.But a quiet revolution has swept the kingdom of corn. Silver Queen, that elegant cob of succulent white kernels, no longer reigns. "She's been dethroned," declares Tony Evans, a spokesman for the state Department of Agriculture. "She's the queen in name only."That name, "Silver Queen," still denotes royalty with some Marylanders -- good, white, sweet corn -- even though it has not been queen for perhaps a decade.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
She has a name, really she does. People know her as the "Farm Lady" but her name is Helen Weber. "There's no story here," she says at her farm in northern Baltimore County. "You're not going to take my picture. I've burned every picture of myself." No story, no pictures. To the untrained reader, these would appear to be setbacks. But see, she's really kind of a softie. Weber half-barks at her teen-aged summer helper, "Laugh on your own time!" but it's just something fun to say while watering mums.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
She has a name, really she does. People know her as the "Farm Lady" but her name is Helen Weber. "There's no story here," she says at her farm in northern Baltimore County. "You're not going to take my picture. I've burned every picture of myself." No story, no pictures. To the untrained reader, these would appear to be setbacks. But see, she's really kind of a softie. Weber half-barks at her teen-aged summer helper, "Laugh on your own time!" but it's just something fun to say while watering mums.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 23, 1993
This is the week for black-rind cheese in Baltimore.You won't see any promotions by the American Dairy Council or find color pictures in newspaper food sections. Still, black-rind cheese has a major role this time of year when Baltimoreans turn to traditional holiday dishes.Some of the dishes were born in the Old World; others drifted into Baltimore from the Carolinas, Virginia and the southern counties of Pennsylvania.To check the sales of black-rind cheese, visit any of Baltimore's neighborhood markets -- Lexington, Lafayette, Hollins, Cross Street, Northeast and Broadway.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2008
Picture a steamed crab encrusted with Old Bay seasoning, an ear of Silver Queen corn, a cold Natty Boh served with a handful of Utz potato chips - and a hot summer night in Baltimore leaps to mind. Step back, though, and the relationship between food and place becomes less fixed. Today, the crabs may come from Thailand, the "Silver Queen" is probably a more durable variety with a less-resonant name, and National Bohemian, once the Baltimore Orioles' "official" beer, now is brewed in North Carolina.
FEATURES
November 18, 1990
Bad Back LackEditor: I am responding to the article in the Oct. 21 magazine "Bad Back Attack." I was shocked that under treatment options that there was no mention of the auto-trac table for relief of back pain.This table is widely used throughout private and hospital physical therapy facilities in the Maryland area. . . . The auto-trac table consists of having the patient strapped onto a special table that moves in three different planes. As the table moves, it bends and extends the patient's back.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman | July 31, 1998
She stands on the side of an asphalt driveway, as forlorn as any would-be club-goer on the wrong side of the velvet ropes. All that corn, all those beans in the achingly precious plain brown bags. Those potatoes. But really, it's the corn she covets. Is there -- ? Could he -- ?"All promised," Delmus Hickman says. At 10 a.m.? At 10 a.m., he says firmly. "But tell you what. I can pick you some beans if you'll wait."And he scampers -- no other word for it, even at age 67, Delmus Hickman scampers to his nearby bean patch.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
Baltimore's only potato chip company has been bought by the owner of an Eastern Shore company that got its start in the mid-1980s by challenging the maker of Old Bay for its near monopoly of the steamed crab seasoning market.Mrs. Ihrie's Potato Chips Inc., an East Baltimore business born out of tragedy nearly 70 years ago, was bought by Joseph L. Bernard, owner and president of Wye River Inc. on Kent Island.Mr. Bernard, 38, declined to reveal the price other than to say, "It was in the millions of dollars."
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
In corn-crazy Maryland, especially in corn-rich August, the sweet-corn disciples have worshiped for years at the throne of the exalted corn queen. The queen, of course, was Silver Queen.But a quiet revolution has swept the kingdom of corn. Silver Queen, that elegant cob of succulent white kernels, no longer reigns. "She's been dethroned," declares Tony Evans, a spokesman for the state Department of Agriculture. "She's the queen in name only."That name, "Silver Queen," still denotes royalty with some Marylanders -- good, white, sweet corn -- even though it has not been queen for perhaps a decade.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 27, 1994
Say hallelujah and pass the butter! The sweet corn has arrived.I had a couple ears of corn Sunday that were so sweet that eating them had me curling my toes with delight. There I was, barefoot in the the kitchen, attacking two pieces of sweet corn. I was in such a frenzy, the corn cobs moved like the carriages of a typewriter -- left, right, return.All I knew about the corn was that the kernels were white and it was delicious. But after talking with Ronald Sewell, the Taneytown farmer who grew the corn, and with a couple other farmers -- John Selby in Centreville and Pam Pahl in Woodstock -- I got a quick education on the sweet corn scene.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | January 9, 2009
Dining in Nashville means having your cardiologist on speed dial. A look at the local food and drink of the Music City and Charm City: NASHVILLE Country ham and red-eye gravy Get this: The gravy starts with the drippings in a pan in which slices of ham were fried. So it's ham gravy on ham. Served with a nice ham salad? Pork barbecue In case you didn't get enough ham. MoonPie Graham-cracker cookies, marshmallow filling, chocolate dip. Who needs a bathroom scale, anyway? Stack cake Sugar, eggs, molasses, buttermilk, flour ... you can feel your arteries hardening.
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