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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1994
FREDERICK -- They showcased a softball-style pitcher who blanked the opposition for 3 1/3 innings, a defense that played respectably enough and a bench long on enthusiasm.But the Colorado Silver Bullets, the first all-women pro baseball team, continued to suffer with a familiar malady last night before about 5,000 at Frederick's Grove Stadium.They haven't learned how to hit."We have to find some way to score runs. That has been our biggest problem," said manager Phil Niekro after the Bullets' record dropped to 1-13 with a 3-1 defeat to the Rock Creek Ravens.
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By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
On a recent weeknight in Edgewood, a small group of parishioners gathered in a strip mall sanctuary as the Rev. Tony McDonald talked about a crisis facing the community. Standing on a carpeted podium, surrounded by temporary walls in a converted retail store, McDonald said recent crime was a call to arms to spread the word of God. "We need renewal - we need a fresh start," he said, as parishioners shouted in support. "Edgewood must be known for its relationship with God. We've got to get God back in our community."
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
The long-promised catalog still isn't ready, but fans of the Colorado Silver Bullets can buy merchandise by phone as well as at the ballpark.In April and early May, a fairly limited assortment of items was selling briskly at the team's training headquarters in Winter Haven, Fla."We can't keep shirts in stock," assistant general manager Kevin Lewis said last month. He said the biggest sellers were shirts, which were on their third shipment, and pen bats.Lewis said that the players were a hit with high school players attending a baseball camp in Orlando, Fla., during spring break when the Silver Bullets were practicing at Tinker Field there.
NEWS
By Scott Armstrong | April 9, 2004
WASHINGTON -- After a nervous start, Condoleezza Rice carefully groomed the Bush administration's mussed account of the road to Sept. 11 yesterday, easily disposing with the 9/11 commission's comparative nitpicking. Concentrating on more superficial disagreements, the commission let slip by its best opportunity to date for public insight into why 9/11 happened, what could and should have been done and whether our government has learned any meaningful lessons. Commissions -- like congressional committees -- are born convinced that if each member asks their own set of questions, sheer repetition will assure thoroughness.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | June 13, 1995
News . . . But Mostly Views:Took in some of the Colorado Silver Bullets game with an outfit called the Navy Mariners in Washington Sunday. And although a few players on the all-women Bullets showed definite aptitude for the game, the team's making application for inclusion in a Class A minor league in the near future is largely fantasy.Some players may be able to compete as individuals -- Bill Veeck once said he thought Babe Didrikson Zaharias might have been able to compete in the majors as a second baseperson -- but a whole squad?
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | June 18, 1995
FREDERICK -- An 11-year-old girl stretched as far as she could across the railing, trying to catch the attention of one of the Colorado Silver Bullets at Harry Grove Stadium.She didn't want an autograph. She only wanted to ask a question: "How do I try out for the team?"Lee Anne Ketcham smiled and sprinted over to the girl with the same drive that led her to join the Silver Bullets, the first women's professional baseball team recognized by the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
FREDERICK -- When K.C. Clark hustled around the bases yesterday after taking a turn in the batting cage, the scene could have been lifted from any other baseball practice.Except for the blond ponytail flapping beneath her helmet.These weren't the boys of summer working out at Harry Grove Stadium, though a couple of hairstyles were about all that gave them away. The shortstop snags a bouncer up the middle and flips to second for an imaginary force. Another player races out to shallow center field to make a catch.
SPORTS
By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 6, 1997
Few images of the late-'70s Orioles are more enduring than those involving center fielder Al Bumbry. Short in height, but long on charisma, Bumbry was embodied in care-free moments by a broad smile, in moments of concentration by his piston-like gum-chewing.He was everyman's ballplayer. He won a Rookie of the Year award. He hustled out grounders and ran into walls. He hit a respectable .281 for his career and still holds the club's stolen-base record (252).Along the way, he became a local hero.
NEWS
By Scott Armstrong | April 9, 2004
WASHINGTON -- After a nervous start, Condoleezza Rice carefully groomed the Bush administration's mussed account of the road to Sept. 11 yesterday, easily disposing with the 9/11 commission's comparative nitpicking. Concentrating on more superficial disagreements, the commission let slip by its best opportunity to date for public insight into why 9/11 happened, what could and should have been done and whether our government has learned any meaningful lessons. Commissions -- like congressional committees -- are born convinced that if each member asks their own set of questions, sheer repetition will assure thoroughness.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
Orlando, Fla. -- One heard about it on TV, got in her car and just started driving from her home in Cincinnati. One flat tire, a smoking engine and a night spent at a Georgia rest stop later, she made it.Another woman pleaded and cajoled until a police officer allowed her onto a highway in Tennessee that had been closed by an ice storm. And one managed to get a flight out of New York's LaGuardia Airport even after another plane skidded off a snow-slicked runway.Neither rain nor snow nor a long history of being kept out of the boy's club of professional baseball was going to keep them from their chance to join the first women's minor league team, the Colorado Silver Bullets.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush's national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice, faced tough questioning yesterday from the commission investigating the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as she sought to bolster the administration's claim that it was well aware of the threat posed by al-Qaida and did everything it could to prevent the disaster. Rice said Bush had sought to devise an overall strategy to counter the terrorist threat, including warning signals that the intelligence community was picking up in the summer of 2001, but insisted that there was "no silver bullet" that could have kept the attacks from occurring.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Frederick Rasmussen and Marcia Myers and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
ABOARD THE ACELA - With the 5 a.m. departure of its new Acela Express from Washington yesterday, Amtrak launched North America's first high-speed rail service on a journey that many hope will begin a U.S. rail revolution. The round-trip train to Boston, which reaches speeds of 150 miles per hour, marks an intensive and costly new commitment by Amtrak to lure commuters out of cars and planes and give the company a larger share of the travel market in the Northeast corridor. First-class tickets for yesterday's train sold out early, and sales for business-class seats were brisk.
SPORTS
By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 6, 1997
Few images of the late-'70s Orioles are more enduring than those involving center fielder Al Bumbry. Short in height, but long on charisma, Bumbry was embodied in care-free moments by a broad smile, in moments of concentration by his piston-like gum-chewing.He was everyman's ballplayer. He won a Rookie of the Year award. He hustled out grounders and ran into walls. He hit a respectable .281 for his career and still holds the club's stolen-base record (252).Along the way, he became a local hero.
NEWS
February 12, 1997
JUST THREE DAYS before Valentine's Day, Republican leaders staged a love-in for President Clinton on Capitol Hill yesterday. They ignored nasty areas of disagreement, such as campaign reform and the harsh treatment of legal immigrants, to focus on five goals for which there supposedly is general accord: welfare-to-work proposals, federal aid to education, juvenile justice, help for the District of Columbia and tax reduction -- all in the context of a...
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
The Gary administration, elected two years ago promising to fix the county's snarled retirement system, believes the solution to Anne Arundel County's pension troubles may be locked in a file cabinet in Hartford, Conn.There, at the giant Cigna Insurance Co. headquarters, is a drawer full of paperwork the county's lawyers say was collected as a defense to a lawsuit that never was filed.Cigna was the actuary for Anne Arundel's $750 million pension fund during the 1980s, when the County Council created one of Maryland's most generous retirement plans for top officials.
NEWS
January 19, 1996
IN RECENT YEARS, Maryland has been unfairly accused of being a tax hell. The high taxes, we have been told, are the reason businesses bypass the state when they are looking to expand or relocate. The fact is there are other, more important reasons why Maryland isn't competitive with neighboring states in attracting business investment.As reporter Jay Hancock pointed out last Sunday, Maryland's taxes are actually competitive with surrounding states. Virginia, whose marginal rate on personal income is greater than Maryland's, or Pennsylvania, whose corporate tax rate is 10.99 percent compared to Maryland's 7 percent, are considered to have much more hospitable tax systems for business.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
On a recent weeknight in Edgewood, a small group of parishioners gathered in a strip mall sanctuary as the Rev. Tony McDonald talked about a crisis facing the community. Standing on a carpeted podium, surrounded by temporary walls in a converted retail store, McDonald said recent crime was a call to arms to spread the word of God. "We need renewal - we need a fresh start," he said, as parishioners shouted in support. "Edgewood must be known for its relationship with God. We've got to get God back in our community."
NEWS
June 16, 1992
Turning over management of nine Baltimore public schools to a for-profit firm "appears to us right now to be a silver bullet" to improve education, Walter G. Amprey, the city's school superintendent, said last week.The company, Educational Alternatives, Inc. (EAI), offers a plausible plan. In a system where so many things are working so badly, Dr. Amprey, the school board and Mayor Kurt Schmoke are correct to try new ideas. This one is particularly creative. Baltimore's willingness to move in a new direction has already created a positive impression about the city's commitment to improve its schools and attracted positive national publicity.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | June 18, 1995
FREDERICK -- An 11-year-old girl stretched as far as she could across the railing, trying to catch the attention of one of the Colorado Silver Bullets at Harry Grove Stadium.She didn't want an autograph. She only wanted to ask a question: "How do I try out for the team?"Lee Anne Ketcham smiled and sprinted over to the girl with the same drive that led her to join the Silver Bullets, the first women's professional baseball team recognized by the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | June 13, 1995
News . . . But Mostly Views:Took in some of the Colorado Silver Bullets game with an outfit called the Navy Mariners in Washington Sunday. And although a few players on the all-women Bullets showed definite aptitude for the game, the team's making application for inclusion in a Class A minor league in the near future is largely fantasy.Some players may be able to compete as individuals -- Bill Veeck once said he thought Babe Didrikson Zaharias might have been able to compete in the majors as a second baseperson -- but a whole squad?
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